What year bikes should pass on if your in the market for a used bike
Close
    
    
Results 1 to 5 of 5
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By littletommy
  • 1 Post By Purple

Thread: What year bikes should pass on if your in the market for a used bike

  1. #1
    Junior Member stevenmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    4

    What year bikes should pass on if your in the market for a used bike

    Hi , I have read somewhere that some years has some kind of engine problems but I can't remember what years and what the problems were . I'm wanting to get this bike but I want to bypass the years they had trouble . could you all list the problems with the year of bike . And if that problem is fixable with a newer year interchangeable part to solve the problems . Or is it best to bypass problem bikes with out fixing . what years are the ones to get . Thanks for your help in advance
    Last edited by stevenmichael; 03-18-2015 at 11:47 AM.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator littletommy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Spokane, Washington
    Posts
    17,423
    87's could be problematic with the CDI and it had a weaker electrical system. Although, there are many of them around, mine included. You are good to go with anything 88 and up. Later models had disc front brakes, drum or disc, they work about the same. Earlier ones had a kick starter, which is nice.
    Fred likes this.
    1st John 1:9
    If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

    John 3:16
    For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

    John 3:17
    For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.

    Hidden Content <<<Click here. Hidden Content

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Ynys Môn
    Posts
    4,594
    I would add to the above by saying -

    The engines in these units are pretty bullet proof, up to around 30k, at which point you should at least “consider” rebuilding the top end. This is par for the course on most small 4 stroke Jap singles back as far as I can remember (which is quite a way). You have to consider that the engine design hasn’t changed much over the years.

    In 2001/2002 they put a CV carb on it, but that was more about emissions and efficiency than anything else. Around the same time the alternator output was increased slightly (but that can be overcome on the old models by putting LED equivalents in place), and introduced a front disc (at the expense of a kick start, which with a lot of faffing about can be retro-fitted) – which performs about the same as the old drum brake, though spare / replacement drum front wheels are harder to find these days.

    Carb probs are common, but this isn’t a design fault (as such). Just do the routine stuff and you’ll be fine. It’s when they don’t get used much that you increase the chance of a carb fault. Cost pennies to fix (and hours to find).

    There are rumours of a 5th gear / selector problem that I am unable to confirm, though replacement is easy enough with a stronger set-up – no idea of what years were affected by this.

    I would suggest that if any year had a definite problem, there would be warnings all over this forum to avoid, and that Yamaha would have sorted it pretty quickly. I have seen no evidence of this.

    As much fun as these bikes are, I research the hell out of something before I buy it, and if there was any chance of these units failing (especially out on the trail when you are utterly reliant on it getting back to base) I wouldn’t have touched it with a barge pole.

    If I would improve anything, it would be the fuel capacity. 1.8 gallons on a bike that (even if you get 70 mpg out of it) is a miserable range. Various fixes to this can be found all over this site – none of them “ideal” – just strap a jerry can on the back.

    So – find your ideal bike, in the colour scheme you like best, with the lowest mileage possible – and just go for it.

    The biggest problem you’re likely to have on these is choosing how to modify it ……..

    Oh yeah – a word of warning – look up “death wing” on here – it refers to the stock front tire.
    Last edited by Purple; 03-18-2015 at 01:03 PM.
    admiral likes this.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Frosty Hollow
    Posts
    13,095
    3-4 years ago, there was a rash of 2006 model year TW200 owners reporting an engine base gasket leak as a common problem. Of course not all TW owners are Forum members, so it's really hard to determine if this was a trend or not.

    In more recent years, a leaky base gasket is being reported by owners from lots of different model year's. I wouldn't go so far as to say it's a wide spread problem, just a few here and there.

    The fix for the leaky base gasket is to get a 2010 or newer base gasket, regardless of TW year. Base gasket would fit all the years. If you're mechanically inclined, it's easy to repair yourself. If not so mechanically inclined, I'd take it to a dealer, independent shop, or even a buddy with wrench skills.

    Around 2013 I replaced my base gasket on my 2005 which I have owned since new. Over 2-3 years, the leak on mine started as a minor appearance of wetness, then slight seepage, finally progressed to a couple drops after each ride. I repaired it before it got worse. Again, this is not a huge problem by any means, just something to be aware of.

    But they are fun!

  6. #5
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    NW Tennessee
    Posts
    10,664
    If you go with a good synthetic motorcycle oil after break in you can forget about needing rings at 30k. I had about 16k on Tdub before switching to synthetic, and she still went over 50k when the rings were replaced because of a base gasket leak. Tdub succumbed to a broken cam chain at 60,212 miles, I expect had I switched to synthetic at 2k she'd still be humming.




Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Random bikes that show up on bike night
    By silverhead in forum Other Bikes
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 03-31-2015, 09:21 PM
  2. Carson Pass through Ebbetts Pass, July 4th
    By Fred in forum Trails, Off-road, and Adventure Riding
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-15-2014, 06:54 PM
  3. 6 electric bikes ready to battle any gas bike
    By littletommy in forum Off-Topic
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-19-2014, 01:34 PM
  4. 6 electric bikes ready to battle any gas bike
    By littletommy in forum Other Bikes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-19-2014, 01:34 PM
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-02-2013, 10:23 AM