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Thread: New TW owner

  1. #1
    Junior Member farmbo's Avatar
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    With a little luck I should have my first TW here by next week. I plan on using it for driving between fields here in South Dakota. I guess my future goal is to modify a 2 inch hitch bar rack and haul the bike on the front of my tractors, and then be able to set the bike off when Im doing field work. But for now what mods should I plan on doing to the little bike right away? Should I really toss the factory chain and sprockets? Carb settings? Foot pegs? Im at about 1300 feet elevation.

  2. #2
    Senior Member peruano's Avatar
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    Farmbo, Welcome and enjoy. The bottom line is you can do as much or little as you want. Being a bit higher than sealevel is not a liability - everyone thinks the TW is tuned a bit lean and with elevation gain, you want to be a bit leaner than normal. The stock chain is good for a few thousand miles (and especially if you are not on the throttle heavy), but the sooner you change it the longer your stock sprockets will probably last. I'm running standard pegs and see no need to change. You probably will want to add the ATV seat pad available from Walmart, and some cargo carrying capability but the gearing is probably good for your appliation and let the other options come as you can rationalize them and not because some of us thought they were a must. Just MHO. Tom
    Tom - TW200 2002, Kawasaki VN 500 2006

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  3. #3
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Sure, the stock chain will last a few thousand miles, maybe 6000 if you are anal about maintenance. However, when the chain is toast, the sprockets will also be toast. Sprockets, lock plates for the sprocket hardware, a gasket for the side cover to change the front sprocket, and a cheap chain will set you back about $65 plus shipping from the online sources. An o-ring chain runs about $5 more and will last 20-25,000 miles, as will the sprockets, with barely enough care to keep it from rusting. 4 times the chain life and less maintenance for $70 up front as opposed to $300+ and constant chain maintenance over time is a no-brainer.



    As for the carb, one-size bigger main, raise the needle, open the pilot screw a tad, and you'll have a cooler running engine with more power and better throttle response. Well worth the cost of a main jet and a tiny flat washer.




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  5. #4
    Senior Member jeffreyloxley's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard, Farmbo.



    I've only had my TW200 for a month, but would add two-cents to what Peruano mentioned above. I read posts from everyone in the forum and compiled a list of about 200 things I thought I might do to the bike while it was sitting in my garage waiting for plates; everything from carb adjustments to chains & sprockets. Long story short, once I began riding it, the only thing I have done to my bike is add a cargo rack behind my seat (from IMMIXRacing) and swapped out the stock foot pegs with bigger ones (from D2Moto). Everything else is perfect the way it is. I have plenty of power when I need it (accidentally brought the front wheel a few inches off the ground the other morning when I let the clutch out too fast at the light), and now that I'm getting used to the sound of a higher RPM, I have no problem zipping up to 60 or 65 when I need to (something I thought I would need a sprocket change to do, but don't). So, like Peruano, I recommend you ride the bike the way it is for a few weeks and you'll have a better idea of what you want to change after that, if anything at all.



    Oh, I forgot to mention, I live in Sierra Vista, AZ (elev. roughly 5000 ft.) What Peruano mentioned is correct. I eat a little more gas up here, but hardly notice any other pitfalls in engine performance. She starts in the blink of an eye and runs great all day long.



    Enjoy. Jeff
    2010 TW200

  6. #5
    Senior Member gskeem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
    Welcome aboard, Farmbo.



    I've only had my TW200 for a month, but would add two-cents to what Peruano mentioned above. I read posts from everyone in the forum and compiled a list of about 200 things I thought I might do to the bike while it was sitting in my garage waiting for plates; everything from carb adjustments to chains & sprockets. Long story short, once I began riding it, the only thing I have done to my bike is add a cargo rack behind my seat (from IMMIXRacing) and swapped out the stock foot pegs with bigger ones (from D2Moto). Everything else is perfect the way it is. I have plenty of power when I need it (accidentally brought the front wheel a few inches off the ground the other morning when I let the clutch out too fast at the light), and now that I'm getting used to the sound of a higher RPM, I have no problem zipping up to 60 or 65 when I need to (something I thought I would need a sprocket change to do, but don't). So, like Peruano, I recommend you ride the bike the way it is for a few weeks and you'll have a better idea of what you want to change after that, if anything at all.



    Oh, I forgot to mention, I live in Sierra Vista, AZ (elev. roughly 5000 ft.) What Peruano mentioned is correct. I eat a little more gas up here, but hardly notice any other pitfalls in engine performance. She starts in the blink of an eye and runs great all day long.



    Enjoy. Jeff
    The chain swap to an O-ring made sense to me from day one, given my new bike.. Add options as needed after riding and getting to know what to add for your needs. I have no problem with stock carb settings from sealevel to 3,500 not to say it may be an issue with reason at higher els. Enjoy the bike.

  7. #6
    Senior Member shocker's Avatar
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    The O-ring chain swap should be on the list. You will be much happier-not as noisy, requires way fewer adjustments, and you don't have to change the sprockets if you do the chain swap before it ruins the sprockets. You will enjoy the TW for field work.

  8. #7
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Actually, in much of the world the TW is sold as transportation for farmers.




  9. #8
    Senior Member RockyTFS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmbo View Post
    With a little luck I should have my first TW here by next week. I plan on using it for driving between fields here in South Dakota. I guess my future goal is to modify a 2 inch hitch bar rack and haul the bike on the front of my tractors, and then be able to set the bike off when Im doing field work. But for now what mods should I plan on doing to the little bike right away? Should I really toss the factory chain and sprockets? Carb settings? Foot pegs? Im at about 1300 feet elevation.


    I installed an o-ring chain right away D.I.D. 428V O-Ring Chain 122 Length 428V x 122

    Sold by: Powersport Superstore, Inc.

    $67.05 each Item subtotal: $67.05) (from Amazon)

    Definitely the best initial mod for anyone who plans to keep their bike for a long time. No need to change sprockets for your area conditions unless you have a LOT of sand. I went to a 13 tooth front for the Rocky Mountains, but I think stock gearing will suit you just fine.



    And the D2Moto footpegs. When using varying types of footware, sometimes just running shoes for short rides in the dirt at low speeds, I found them much more comfortable than stock and I think less likely to let your foot slip off at an inopportune moment. For only $20, that was an easy decision.



    I got by by with the carb by just adding one washer and turning the pilot needle out 1 turn. That worked OK down to sea level, but it wasn't very hot, in the 70's mostly. Perhaps in the hot summer at 1300 ft. the risk of overheating would be significant, but probably only if you rode hard up long hills, miles in deep sand, or on the highway into a 30mph headwind for hours.



    I put a Cycleracks rear rack on right away as I usually take a small packbag and cooler on most rides.



    I think the bike stock right out of the box will probably do just fine in your environment. Change that oil at 25 miles! And again at 200 to 300 miles. Amazing what crap comes out in those first few hours.



    You're gonna love that little T-Dub!!
    Rocky
    2018 TW200
    2014 BMW R1200GS LC

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