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Thread: New here and looking to absorb info on the TDub

  1. #1
    Member paper's Avatar
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    New here and looking to absorb info on the TDub

    I've been a dual sport rider for years and with age (fitty) I'm finding less of a need to blast and more of a desire to wander, so I've been kicking around getting a TW.. I'm looking at a 93' with low miles and have come here for the ins, outs, ups, downs, and what to look for and not worry about items on these bikes.

    Weaknesses, cheap upgrades, mandatory upgrades, etc..

    As far as this one, I'm fully aware of the items to be concerned about just due to age when it comes to rubber parts and whatnot.. I rode a 30 year old BMW to work this morning, so I know about what to look for when it comes to age.. I'm really after what to do to make it bullet proof when I'm wandering up in the UP of Michigan, 30 miles from my truck.

    So, Howdy All!!! Now, overload me with info..

  2. #2
    Senior Member Devils Advocate's Avatar
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    Welcome paper. At fidy five you'll fit right in, youngster.

    Must upgrades are new front tire. I went with the Pirelli MT21 but am kind of now thinking I should have went with the Dunlap 606. There was an up grade to the CDI and electrical system starting in 2001. You will see members here that have issues from time to time with their ignition. Mines a 2002 so I have no first hand experience. Other than that it's a good solid bike for putzing around in the woods. Get one, change out the front tire and ride it for a while and then decide what you might want to change.

    I live up here by Kingsford/Iron Mountain so be sure to look me up if you can.
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  3. #3
    Member paper's Avatar
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    Will do and I know the area well.. I've been to Quinnesec a few times over the years to work at the paper mill.

    I haven't even bought one yet, but I'm already tire shopping.. This 93' is still wearing the original rubber.. (EEK!!) The guy bought it 15 years ago with 2000 miles on it and its main job has been to teach his kids how to ride, so I'm sure somewhere down the line I'll have to look at clutch plates

    But I'm tire shopping.. Anything will be better than the 22 year old stockers.

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  5. #4
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    You got it …….

    The ’93 is pretty bullet proof as TW’s go – but (my advice) would be to lose the stock front tire, and be aware that off-road rear tires (Bridgestone TW34) are getting thin on the ground (discontinued) – so grab one now. There will likely be a replacement eventually, but for now, there’s only the TW204 which is more of a road tire. Recommendations for replacement front tires are two a penny, and I’m sure others will shortly chime in with their experiences.

    Racks – factory rear platform is rated for 7 kilos only – so if you plan on carrying anything more than a six-pack, you’ll need a rack. Take a look at “Manracks” and “Cycleracks” – each have their strong points – be aware that Cycleracks is currently on back-order. The standard factory Yamaha rack is as much good as a bar of chocolate.

    “Bark busters” – saves time and money on constantly buying levers – if you’re planning on off-road, get them now.

    All the TW’s have small carbs, which are prone to gumming up when not run for a while (sometimes a few months will do it). No matter what the previous owner tells you, take it with a pinch of salt. There’s an excellent sticky on how to deal with this here - https://tw200forum.com/forum/technica...back-life.html - best to run through the check list before going out into the wild.

    Don’t forget the grease nipple on the swinging arm – the bike will love you for it.

    Other than that – you’re good to go – get to know the bike first, make further decisions later – and welcome to the greatest show on Earth ……….

    (P.S. - you might want to look at the condition of the cables - clutch and brake - cheap fix, but a bugger if they fail on you)
    Last edited by Purple; 08-27-2015 at 11:45 AM.
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    Member paper's Avatar
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    00R0R_lioDwigoR2R_600x450.jpg

    That's it.. Any idea what rack that is?

  7. #6
    Super Moderator littletommy's Avatar
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    Welcome Paper to the forum! That is a Yamaha rack and with the weak sub frame, you can carry 7 lbs. on it.
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  8. #7
    Member paper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by littletommy View Post
    Welcome Paper to the forum! That is a Yamaha rack and with the weak sub frame, you can carry 7 lbs. on it.
    Thank you littletommy!! I was afraid of that.. No problem.. It'll go in the scrap bin and I'll start looking at photos of various racks and build something. I was a TIG welder/Fabricator in a previous life.

    And thanks for the link, Purple!! I'll heed your warning about cables and will give the entire bike a complete service this winter, changing out everything for fresh. I have an extra set of aluminum panniers laying around that may get mounted, too.. I'd love to turn it into a camping/trail bike to ride such things as the Trans Wisconsin Adventure Trail and whatnot.. Basically a mini adventure bike. It'll take up space next to my R1200GS and my KLR650 which already don't get ridden enough.
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  9. #8
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Member Toyanvil has a good design you could use for rear rack inspiration; good in that it transfers heavy loads to the frame via the passenger foot pegs rather than the somewhat weak sub-frame.RIMG0077-X2.jpg
    For back-woods reliability one needs to consider what has highest probability to strand you. Flat tires are annoying but not crippling, one can walk alongside bike usually while motoring along guiding bike in first gear. However one can carry a pump, co2, and/or pressurized sealant as thirty miles is a long walk. I have done all three plus pre-add sealant like Ride-On or Slime.

    What really strands a fellow is an inoperative driveline, usually darn engine won't start for whatever reason and one drains the battery. This is where a pre-2001 kickstarted equipped bike shines. Keep engine tuned up and chain adjusted in good condition so as to reduce this risk.

    Broken controls are annoying but not crippling. Throttle cables can be jury rigged; who needs brakes for most self-rescues; and gearbox can be mashed up and down if you have a broken clutch perch. However hand guards really reduce chance of control breakages.

    Basically the TW has no inherent weaknesses nor need for cheap or mandatory upgrades. Certainly it benefits from upgrades but you could probably buy the bike, throw a day-pack on with some goodies and ride,ride,ride.

    What can really end a day in the saddle is hurting oneself like an injured paw so I heartily endorse gloves and hand guards, packing fluids and food to stay on top of your game; and pack painkillers plus a little first aid for when you find yourself not on top of your game nor on top of the TW.

    Welcome to the forum. I chose my TW for the same reason I think you are interested in one: A safe way to explore and wander.
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  10. #9
    Member paper's Avatar
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    Thanks Fred!!
    I'll do a search for more photos of that design.. I was figuring on making something out of aluminum tubing, but being able to weld directly to the passenger peg mounts would be a huge advantage and that eliminates aluminum unless I eliminate the passenger pegs and turn the attachment points into a mounting plate for the rack and maybe extra tie down points. This will be a winter project anyway, so once I actually have a BIKE in front of me I'm sure I'll get a few ideas, too.

    As far as why I'm here, you're pretty much spot on.. Many of the trails I'd like to ride are much easier to putz around on with tires wider than a 90/90-21.. Sand and I will get along much better on the TW than the skinny front on my KLR and I the GS is too expensive to repair if you screw up on sand..


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  11. #10
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Gosh paper, from your photos I can see you do not travel light. At least not on your Kawasaki or BMW.So you seem to be a candidate for a higher capacity rack. Most of us have the Cycle Rack and you have probably read of various failures they very occasionally incur. With your welding skills you could reinforce subframe and/or add additional strut to rear foot peg a la Toyanvin should you elect to get a Cyclerack.
    Sounds like you know what you are doing so go have fun with the new TW should you decide to purchase it. It is a good machine for poking along exploring at sedate speeds and for some reason seems to earn more smiles than frowns for those we encounter on the trails.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
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