Motojackrack feasibility.
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Thread: Motojackrack feasibility.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Azxj91's Avatar
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    Motojackrack feasibility.

    Was looking into a Motojackrack to haul my TW around. The kind that supports the bike under the engine and foot pegs, then jacks it up. Found a few old threads talking about it. I am concerned about the lack of frame and the somewhat flimsy skid plate supporting all the weight. I read a recommendation for a better skid and bigger pegs to solve the problems.

    Those using a similar rack have any insight?

    What's everyone's opinion on this rack vs a "rail type".

    Thanks all!!

    Got good info from this thread. Looking for updates.

    https://tw200forum.com/forum/general-...ing-racks.html

  2. #2
    Banned ZDR1's Avatar
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    Fred uses one. GOPR0069.JPG he should be along soon.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Azxj91's Avatar
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    Oh.... And any issue with the suspension just hanging down at full droop going down the road?

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Hi Azxj91; I like my rack but then I do have the rigid skid plate and wider DMO foot-pegs that address the stability issue you mentioned. That van is lifted so receiver is ~16" above ground. As such ground clearance for TW tires is not an issue so far.
    One feature I like over my old rail type is the compact size when bike is not attached. Stores easier but more importantly while camping I do not have to contend with walking into the unloaded rails at rear of vehicle. Ouch!
    If height of your haul vehicle allows TW tires to dangle too close to ground one could conceivably cinch TW's suspension a few inches with compression straps.
    Additionally I like the much reduced risk of bike falling off while loading and un-loading by myself compared to the more common rail-type receiver bike carrier. Once one wrestles the TW onto the platform it rests securely hands free while additional clamping and strapping down can be leisurely done. Makes a fairly decent work stand too if one needs to get the wheels off the ground.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
    Hidden Content All Things Considered I’ld Rather Be Motorcycling

  6. #5
    Senior Member Azxj91's Avatar
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    Thanks Fred! Hmmmm. Lifted safari van! Nice!

    So at least a beefed up skid plate is needed, which is on my list anyway. It won't harm the shocks/ forks to be at full droop like that?
    The smaller size and loading are definite advantages...

  7. #6
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    The droop is an interesting consideration I had not worried about, having assumed bike's suspension's rebound stops were beefy enough. However the additional straps I use to secure both wheels prevent suspension travel and hopefully any damage during transit. The AWD Astro van makes a good base camp for TWing backcountry adventures, gets me to remote campsites where my post-ride moaning and groaning won't disturb other campers.
    Certainly the old rail carrier I had would occasionally drag and hang up crossing ditches as it extended quite a bit further to rear of vehicle. Here is old ramp, the wooden struts off of the overhead rack both eliminated some slop but more importantly held bike safely upright while solo loading and unloading on sloping terrain:
    P1010334.JPG
    Here is Motojack, I actually had it cut and welded 4" lower to allow opening of my pick-up's camper door as well as van's rear doors while attached. In stock form the bike was carried an additional 4" higher.P1010232.JPG
    Last edited by Fred; 09-18-2015 at 12:37 PM.
    Dryden-Tdub likes this.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
    Hidden Content All Things Considered I’ld Rather Be Motorcycling

  8. #7
    Senior Member Azxj91's Avatar
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    Looks like a nice set up Fred! The Motojack listed locally already sold. I was too slow. Thanks for the info, I am going to keep my eye out for another one.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    They are a bit rare to find and tend to sell quickly, good luck.
    I drove to Lake Tahoe to buy mine used but reconditioned for $200 knowing shipping charges from farther way might be prohibitive.
    The pivot points holes tend to get elongated through the mild steel frame as the pivots are big stress concentrators. Previous owner had cleverly welded thick washers to restore correct size and re-enforce the frame. Should you encounter a used one look out for similar wear and possibly use that as a negotiating point on price.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
    Hidden Content All Things Considered I’ld Rather Be Motorcycling

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