Best bike for back of camper
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  1. #1
    Junior Member HiCap's Avatar
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    Considering TW200, XT250, and Honda CRF230L for use on hitch mount on 4x4 pickup with camper.

    1. Easy to load on bike rack.

    2. Best for slow speed exploring in back country.

    3. Fun to ride.



    Any other bikes to consider for this purpose? I had a Suzuki DR650, but was to heavy for this use. Must be street legal, but will ride 90% or more off road. I welcome all suggestions.

  2. #2
    Senior Member TW-Brian's Avatar
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    I've had a Honda CRF230. I got it because it seemed like it would an ideal bike for my needs. I found it to be very uncomfortable to ride from an ergonomic standpoint and the seat was like a board. The front forks allowed the front wheel to bounce all over the place and the rear shock way too stiff. I couldn't wait to get rid of it.



    I've never ridden an XT250 so I can't offer any opinions there.



    My vote would be a TW200 for your needs.



    Brian

  3. #3
    Senior Member bbagwell's Avatar
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    A TW200 would fit your needs perfectly.
    Bryan Bagwell

    1995 Yamaha TW200

    1983 Toyota PU

    2002 Suzuki Grand Vitara

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  5. #4
    Senior Member RockyTFS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiCap View Post
    1. Easy to load on bike rack.

    2. Best for slow speed exploring in back country.

    3. Fun to ride.




    You have just described a T-dub to a T!!!!! I would only add:



    4. Ultra reliable

    5. Fun to ride

    6. Quiet

    7. Fun to ride

    8. Cheap

    9. Fun to ride







    Get one, you won't be sorry! Think about changing the front sprocket to a 13 if you ride a lot in the mountains at altitude.
    Rocky
    2018 TW200
    2014 BMW R1200GS LC

  6. #5
    Senior Member 805gregg's Avatar
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    That's what I bought mine for, only on a rack on the front.

  7. #6
    Junior Member HiCap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 805gregg View Post
    That's what I bought mine for, only on a rack on the front.


    I am interested in your rack on front of truck, can you post a picture of bike loaded. Where did you get front rack, and is it hitch mounted? Having rack in front would make it possible to enter the rear door of camper without moving bike.

  8. #7
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    I hope you either have a really light camper or a really heavy duty truck. Load the camper with your normal travel load, full tanks, and whomever travels with you, then weigh the front axle. Measure the horizontal distance from the front axle to the center of the rail or baskets of the carrier. Look up the wheelbase of your truck. Divide the front axle-to-carrier distance by the wheelbase. Multiply that quotient by the front axle weight. Deduct that product from the Gross Axle Weight Rating listed on the sticker on the door jamb. The difference is the weight of motorcycle AND carrier you can safely carry.



    Gross Axle Weight Rating - (Front Axle-To-Carrier Distance / Wheelbase) Axle Weight = Weight of Motorcycle AND Carrier



    or

    G - (R / W)A = M

    where

    G = Gross Axle Weight Rating

    R = Front Axle-To-Carrier Distance

    W = Wheelbase

    A = Axle Weight

    M = Weight of Motorcycle AND Carrier



    My guess is that unless you have a really heavy duty truck and/or a really tail-heavy camper, you won't have the carrying capacity on the front axle to safely load 350 pounds of motorcycle and carrier. If you are close, you can try redistributing the load in the camper to free up some front axle capacity. Alternatively, you could seek out a lighter weight motorcycle, say, a CT70 would by cool, or one of the Chinese clones.



    EDIT: Front-mount hitch receivers for pick-ups are fairly common. There are a host of accessoroes that mount in recievers, winches, cooking grill, tables, bicycle carriers, cargo carriers, folding bench seats with rod holders for surf fishing, cargo platforms, tent poles, radio antennas and towers, tall poles for lanterns with polished stainless reflectors to attract the bugs away from the outdoor kitchen while still lighting the kitchen area, poles to hold solar showers and enclosures, etc.. Lots of folks who tow boats or travel trailers find them handy for "backing" trailers down curved ramps or into tricky campsites.




  9. #8
    Junior Member HiCap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qwerty View Post
    I hope you either have a really light camper or a really heavy duty truck. Load the camper with your normal travel load, full tanks, and whomever travels with you, then weigh the front axle. Measure the horizontal distance from the front axle to the center of the rail or baskets of the carrier. Look up the wheelbase of your truck. Divide the front axle-to-carrier distance by the wheelbase. Multiply that quotient by the front axle weight. Deduct that product from the Gross Axle Weight Rating listed on the sticker on the door jamb. The difference is the weight of motorcycle AND carrier you can safely carry.



    Gross Axle Weight Rating - (Front Axle-To-Carrier Distance / Wheelbase) Axle Weight = Weight of Motorcycle AND Carrier



    or

    G - (R / W)A = M

    where

    G = Gross Axle Weight Rating

    R = Front Axle-To-Carrier Distance

    W = Wheelbase

    A = Axle Weight

    M = Weight of Motorcycle AND Carrier



    My guess is that unless you have a really heavy duty truck and/or a really tail-heavy camper, you won't have the carrying capacity on the front axle to safely load 350 pounds of motorcycle and carrier. If you are close, you can try redistributing the load in the camper to free up some front axle capacity. Alternatively, you could seek out a lighter weight motorcycle, say, a CT70 would by cool, or one of the Chinese clones.



    EDIT: Front-mount hitch receivers for pick-ups are fairly common. There are a host of accessoroes that mount in recievers, winches, cooking grill, tables, bicycle carriers, cargo carriers, folding bench seats with rod holders for surf fishing, cargo platforms, tent poles, radio antennas and towers, tall poles for lanterns with polished stainless reflectors to attract the bugs away from the outdoor kitchen while still lighting the kitchen area, poles to hold solar showers and enclosures, etc.. Lots of folks who tow boats or travel trailers find them handy for "backing" trailers down curved ramps or into tricky campsites.
    Thanks for information, on more research I find that the headlights being blocked, and weight on front end put a stop on front mount. I have Four Wheel Camper on it now, with air overload shocks on back, so I think I can use rear mount as long as I don't do any rough 4x4 trails.

  10. #9
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiCap View Post
    Thanks for information, on more research I find that the headlights being blocked, and weight on front end put a stop on front mount. I have Four Wheel Camper on it now, with air overload shocks on back, so I think I can use rear mount as long as I don't do any rough 4x4 trails.


    If you're talking about air shocks, those are a really bad idea. Coil booster springs on shocks are an equally bad idea. Shock mounts are not designed to support weight. Don't ask me how I know. Switch to coil boosters that fit between the axle and frame, additional leaves, or air bags, whichever is appropriate. Much safer.



    Also, watch your rear axle capacity carefully--sitting on the side of a dirt road miles from nowhere with a toasted axle bearing really sucks. Don't ask how I know about axle bearings in the boonies, either. Might want to check your tire capacity, too. Tires are an easy fix, though, more ply rating will carry about anything, but big ol' mudgrips generally have a pretty good capacity, anyway.




  11. #10
    Senior Member cdsdave's Avatar
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    Seems like it would be a lot less complicated and easier on the truck to just hook up a small trailer and take the bike in tow.

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