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  1. #1
    Junior Member Canoesmith's Avatar
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    After 30 years, I want to get a bike again, for mostly trail riding but also around my mountain home. I have decided on the TW200 (of course). There is one nearby at a dealer - 2007 with 160 miles on it - like new for $2700. I probably can get them to take a bit less. Thoughts? I am really a noob on this topic. Thanks for your help.



    steve

  2. #2
    Senior Member Woofhound's Avatar
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    $2700 would probably be top dollar here in washington. I bought my 09 new a year ago for $3200. with a new one you get a warrantee. also make sure it runs perfect. 4 years old with 160 miles means it sat around, could have scrunge in the carb
    2009 WR250R

    2005 V-Strom

    1993 Shadow 1100 with Ural sidecar

    2008 H-D Ultra Classic

    2009 Zuma 125

    2004 Zuma 50

    2000 WR400F

  3. #3
    Senior Member mrlmd's Avatar
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    Get a new battery, oil/filter change, and carb cleaning in with any deal, and remember the tires are already 4 or 5 years old. It may look like new, but it is not.

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  5. #4
    Senior Member mrlmd's Avatar
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    Get a new battery, oil/filter change, and carb cleaning in with any deal, and remember the tires are already 4 or 5 years old. It may look like new, but it is not.

  6. #5
    Senior Member mrlmd's Avatar
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    Get a new battery, oil/filter change, carb cleaning in any deal, and remember the tires are already 4 or 5 years old. It may look like a new bike, but it isn't.

  7. #6
    Senior Member mrlmd's Avatar
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    Sorry about the triple posts above, I submitted it only once and it came out three times and I cannot find a way to delete the extra ones. They can be edited but I don't know how to delete them. At least maybe I got my point across.

  8. #7
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    4-year old bike with super low miles might need a carb cleaning. People make a big deal about doing a carb cleaning but the job is really quite simple. Most carb cleaning problems stem from procedures that result in surprises, like tiny parts falling out unexpectedly and little springs shooting across the room and messing up rubber and plastic parts by letting carb cleaner contact them. Simply put, most problems are caused by poor mechanical skills. However, it isn't rocket science, and is really so simple that my 5-year old grandson has cleaned carbs on lawn equipment. The rest of carb cleaning problems stem from doing things half-assed. Duh. The secrets to success are 1) Know what to expect, 2) Follow instructions, and 3) Use a torque wrench. That's really all there is to it.



    KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT



    Download the appropriate manuals for your year here. Print out the instructions. Read the instructions through several times, until they make sense.



    Copy the parts diagram from the parts catalog here, blow it up life size or a bit better, and print it out. It takes several pages, just tape them together. Lay the printout beside your work area. Before removing anything, consult the instructions and parts diagram so you know when to expect small parts to fall out. As insurance, work over a big rectangular baking pan to catch anything that tries to escape. Better yet, have two pans--one to work over and set the carb in, the other to work with whatever sub-assembly you just took off. I generally disassemble the carb on one table, do the cleaning on another, then return the parts to the first table and lay them out on the parts diagram. this prevents carb cleaner and gunk from spraying itself over previously vleaned parts or parts the carb cleaner can dissolve. Dissassemble the carb per the order given in the repair manual. It really doesn't make any difference, but having instructions eliminates confusion and uncertainty.



    FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS



    Consult both the repair manual and the parts diagram before removing any parts. Know what to expect to fall out of each hole. Nothing is more frustrating than unscrewing something and having a spring shoot across the room, only to vaporize before it hits the wall. This is the event that strikes fear in the hearts of amateurs--be ready to catch the small parts by consulting the parts diagram. Sounds simple, and it is. That's why I'm being redundant.



    For safety, I recommend gloves and eye protection when using compressed air or carb cleaner. Either can blind you in an instant. Passages don't always go in one side and out the other. You can hold a part at arms length under your butt, blow or spray down, and gunk will fly out backwards and hit you in the face. Neither compressed air nor carb cleaner abide by the laws of physics. They are both evil. Don't take the risk.



    As each part comes off or out of the carb, clean, dry, and inspect it, then lay it atop its picture on the diagram. If the part needs replacing, add it to your list of parts you need. Fact is, unless someone has already molested the bike, the parts are probably still perfectly good. This procedure keeps all the parts in order so no screw-ups such as left-over parts or parts in backwards. Take a part out. Clean and inspect, lay it down, take the next part out, clean and inspect, lay it down. Sounds anal, but you will find that this procedure will imprint the location, association, orientation, and attitude of all parts in your brain much better than completely dissassembling the carb and chunking all the parts in a soak for later sorting and confusion. It is never necessary to soak carb parts--modern aerosol cleaners are quick and effective.



    The plug over the pilot screw is easily removed by drilling a small hole in it, then threading in a sheet metal screw until the threads bite, and pulling the screw with pliars. Discard the plug. It serves no purpose other than appeasing the EPA.



    Hardest part of the job is getting the pot-metal screws out without messing them up. Buy a Japanese screwdriver that fits or make one by grinding the point of a Phillips to make it fit. If the heads strip anyway, I recommend small vice grips for the job of initial loosening. Take the recalcerant screws to a hardware store or three and match up some stainless allenhead replacements and matching lock washers. Throw the original screws away. They are evil.



    You've seen the pictures and heard the woes of the broken float pin towers. These breaks occur when a carb body is placed on its side and a tool is used to poke the float pin out of the towers. Float pins are usually a slip fit, and often only go in one way. Use a round wood or plastic toothpick to push the pin out, while supporting the float pin towers with your fingers. If the point won't slide out easily, try pushing it the other way. Remember, it is critical to support the towers, not the carb body, to avoid breaking the towers.



    To clean metal parts: First poke out the holes in metal parts with a bit of copper wire, followed by compressed air, then spray carb cleaner through and on the metal parts. Wet parts that need cleaning of surfaces with a spray of carb cleaner then use a tooth brush or pipe cleaner to do the gentle scrubbing. Rinse with a blast of carb cleaner. Repeat if necessary. It is best to wear gloves and googles when spraying carb cleaner--the stuff is nasty.



    To clean plastic parts: Dish soap and warm water in a bowl far from a sink drain. Trust me about the sink drain. Those things are evil. Anything of consequence can be gently scraped off with a fingernail. Rinse by dipping in a bowl of clean water. Dab dry with a paper towel. Don't leave any lint behind. Do not use compressed air on plastic or rubber parts. Trust me on that. Rubber parts will benefit from a little soft massage with baby oil, just enough to leave a sheen on the surface of the part.



    As each fastener or retainer and its associated parts are removed, consult the parts diagram to be sure all parts are present and accounted for. Leaving an o-ring in the carb body, then zapping it with carb cleaner, can ruin your day. Carb cleaner will quickly ruin rubber and plastic parts.



    Once all the small parts are cleaned, dried, and inspected, all laid out on your parts diagram, double check that each and every part is accounted for. Triple check.



    Once the carb is completely dis-assembled, time to clean up the carb body itself. Use a piece of soft copper wire to probe every hole and passageway from both ends. If there is gunk stopping up a passageway, cleaner cannot contact but a very small surface area of the gunk and the gunk won't dissolve easily. Make sure every passage in the carb body is open to at least a bit of flow before attacking the goo with carb cleaner. Don protective goggles and use compressed air from both ends of every passage to blow out chunks. It might take several repetitions of wire and air to work all the chunks out.



    Once flow has been established in every port, don protective gloves and goggles and use an aerosol carb cleaner with a plastic tube on the sprayer to force cleaner through every passage, both ways. If time is needed, allow a few mintues for the cleaner to work, then run a pipe cleaner through the port, then more spray. Only the cleaner actually contacting goo is working, all the rest is going along for the ride. The working spray quickly reaches chemical equalibrium with the goo and stops working. Spray, wait a few minutes (not long enough for the cleaner to dry), hit it with a pipe cleaner or toothbrush to score the surface and increase the surface area of the goo so the cleaner is more effective, blow with compressed air, repeat. Rinse with clean carb cleaner and blow out the passageways to dry. It sounds involved, but it only takes a few minutes. Give a final rinse with carb cleaner and dry with compressed air.



    Now that all the parts are clean, dry, inspected, it's time to go about acquiring any necessary replacement parts. Your mortal enemies are gravity, wind, ignorance, and curiosity. These four work together to conspire with the evil garage gremlins to ruin your day. It is necessary to protect your nicely organized parts layout from these evil spirits by any means necessary. Trust me, curiousity will get a cat killed, and maybe a kid or spouse. Lock things up. Tell people to avoid your nicely organized mess. Threaten torture and death.



    Once you have built a protective system about your stuff, collect up all parts that need replacing, sorting each with it's own type and purpose into separate zip-loc bags, along with a note of what each is and where it goes and what is necessary. Float bowl screws in one baggy, diagphram cover screws in another, needle in a third (for matching washer diameter), and other parts to its or their own, as necessary. Take all your little baggies and stuff them in a gallon-size zip-loc.



    You are now free to begin the task of parts rustling. Take your time. Collect up all the new parts you'll need. Kick back and relax a bit. Have a beer, and maybe a bbq sandwich. Once all replacement parts are acquired, return them to their place on the parts diagram.



    Follow the instructions in the repair manual to reassemble the carb and set the float.



    USE A TORQUE WRENCH



    Use a torque wrench--you've heard enough of the stripped threads wail. Set the pilot screw at 2.5 turns out. Put a small flat washer between the diagphram and needle circlip. Reinstall the carb. Enjoy.




  9. #8
    Senior Member mrlmd's Avatar
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    You probably just scared the crap out of him even though it's great advice, but I hope he doesn't run away now.

    IMO, the dealer should do that, along with a new battery and oil change to make the deal for that price.

  10. #9
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrlmd View Post
    You probably just scared the crap out of him even though it's great advice, but I hope he doesn't run away now.

    IMO, the dealer should do that, along with a new battery and oil change to make the deal for that price.
    You're right, the dealer should not sell a bike that isn't fit to ride, but most anybody is probably able to do a better job than the flunky at the dealer who works on "simple" bikes.




  11. #10
    Senior Member Wheelie Nelson's Avatar
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    Seems like an ok deal to me. On KBB's website for where I live, it said $2,420 was the dealer retail value. That doesn't account for mileage, so I think it would be worth the extra 280 bucks for one with no miles on it.

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