First 1000 miles
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  1. #1
    Senior Member Hobopoet's Avatar
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    I rode large displacement Japanese bikes for years until a bad accident in Arizona scared me from the sport. Three years ago, I bought a Yamaha C3 scooter to use for my daily commute. 80% of the time, the scooter was fine. But too many times, I wished I had more power, either for safely or for wider ranging rides. After considerable research, I bought a 2010 TW this past December. Now with my first 1000 miles on the clock, I would like to share my impressions.



    CONS: 1) Absolutely worst stock carbueration I've ever seen! 2) For street use, 1st gear is useless. 3) Clunky transmission. When I downshift, the TW often feels like the whole drive train is going to fall onto the pavement. 4) Generally crude: 1980s technology.



    PROS: 1) Very easy to operate, an important factor for new riders. 2) Easy to service (I hope!) 3) Reliable (I hope!) 4) Economical; I get an honest 85 MPG on my daily rides around town. 5) The TW catches attention probably because of those uniquely huge tires.



    Now, if the TW had 250 cc, fuel injection, a six speed transmission and liquid cooling, I would call it perfect. (Of course, that's a Kawasaki KLR 250!) In any event, my TW does what I wanted and expected. Not perfect, sure, but how much perfection actually occurs in the world?

  2. #2
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    The carb can be fixed for under $10.



    For street use, a sprocket change is under $20.



    Switch to an ester-based synthetic oil and the trans will shift easily.



    You call it crude, I would expect a poet to recognize elegant simplicity.



    If the TW had 250 cc, fuel injection, a six speed transmission and liquid cooling, it still wouldn't be a KLR 250. It would be a much better motorcycle than said KLR.




  3. #3
    flw
    Guest flw's Avatar
    What issues have you had with the bike being air cooled ?

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  5. #4
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flw View Post
    What issues have you had with the bike being air cooled ?
    Sometimes in very steep, very difficult terrain, with no breeze and no way to maintain a flow of air over the top end, Tdub has pinged a bit. Liquid cooling would delay the onset of overheating, but eventually the fan would come on and all would be well. At least, that's the theory according to those critical of air cooled engines. my response is that it wouldn't be difficult to wire a 12 volt fan with a sealed motor to blow air over an air cooled engine.



    The real advantage of liquid cooling is more stable engine temperature parameters, which allows closer manufacturing tolerances, allowing for reduced wear, faster break-in, and more powerful states of tune.




  6. #5
    Senior Member jontow's Avatar
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    The real issue with the 12V fan comes down to a severe lack of electricity available on a TW.. I've considered a few times how one might add a second battery and auxiliary charging system, but haven't made it very far. To be honest, around here the issue is that the bike sure does get hot: but the rider overheats much quicker in the sun/high humidity. I find taking lots of breaks in shady spots to be a plenty acceptable use of my time How else am I supposed to fill the huge SD card in my phone with pictures?



    My 2c is simple on this matter: lack of another fluid means less maintenance, less difficulty on the maintenance that you actually have to do, less parts to fail, less hoses to blow in really awful places, and hey, if the radiator or cooling hoses on my TW blow, I'm still riding home.



    Elegant simplicity, indeed. TW200++
    --

    1997 TW, well loved, a bit modified.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Wheelie Nelson's Avatar
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    best thing you can do is drill the slide, rejet, then tune the carb properly, imo. i also regeared mine to a 45 tooth rear. i commute only on mine, and i love it now.

  8. #7
    flw
    Guest flw's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelie Nelson View Post
    best thing you can do is drill the slide, rejet, then tune the carb properly, imo. i also regeared mine to a 45 tooth rear. i commute only on mine, and i love it now.




    So are you able to cruise at what speeds with 45 tooth gear?

  9. #8
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelie Nelson View Post
    best thing you can do is drill the slide, rejet, then tune the carb properly, imo. i also regeared mine to a 45 tooth rear. i commute only on mine, and i love it now.


    I've now had three TWs brought to me after installing "jet kits" that gave instructions for drilling the "slides". All three were "cured" when their "drilled slides" were replaced with stock pieces.



    5LB-1434A-00-00 for 2001+, suction piston assembly, $46.48 plus shipping. I don't know if the part was modified properly according to the instructions or not, but fact is, "drilling the slide" only lets the carb open faster and really provides no additional power, and a carb that opens too fast leads to problems with fuel enrichment, resulting in bogs and stalling unless the carb is tuned significantly richer than it needs to be, which wastes fuel, loads the spark plug, increases carbon build-up, and has the potential to fuel-wash the cylinder bore resulting in ruined cylinder liner, piston, and rings.



    I'm not going to tell anyone not to do it, there may be some slight benefit in throttle response if done right, but if someone really doesn't know what he or she is doing, it might be a waste of $50 to fix the damage done by a $30-60+ jet kit. For all practical purposes, the same improvement can be had simply by installing the Yamaha jet installed in bikes sold anywhere except North America ($3.48), sticking a $0.05 washer under the needle, and turning the pilot screw, without risking a $50 part.



    For 2001 and newer, stock main jet in north America is 125, 126, or 128, depending on year and market, while the rest of the world gets a 132.5. I've found the 132.5 an excellent choice for riding at and near sea level, but a 130 works best above 3000 feet, a 128 above 6000 feet, and for really high in the Rockies, a 125 with the tape pulled off the holes in the airbox cover. YMMV. For the power, smoothness, and throttle response gained, a $5-6 rejet is an awesome return on investment.




  10. #9
    Senior Member rmartin's Avatar
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    Well I like mine!

  11. #10
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmartin View Post
    Well I like mine!
    Yup! I think some people get carried away--if a little is good, a lot is better--and it just ain't always so. Like I said, I don't know how closely the directions were followed when the mods were done, nor do I know which brand(s) of jet kit(s) might have bad instructions. What set of instructions did you use? What parts? Inquiring minds want to know what actually works.




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