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Thread: Hurricane prep

  1. #1
    Member carache's Avatar
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    Although it's unlikely that Hurricane Irene's full force will hit S.VT, we're almost certain to contend with high velocity winds. My temp housing is a 24' camper; my TW's temp housing is the space under my awning with everything else that will, eventually, have a home in a garage/shed. The awning itself and all lightweight items will be secured away, somehow, but I'm wondering if folks have suggestions for how to best insure against damage (to the bike, I mean, although perhaps people have RV advice, too)?



    Tx.

  2. #2
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    Do you have a storage unit complex nearby. Maybe you could store your TW and any other valuables in one for the short term. Better than being out in the open if the winds are as strong as you anticipate.
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  3. #3
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    I like the storage unit idea. Find one big enough for your entire rig. That's the voice of experience. I've been RVing all my life. I've been in 80mph straightline winds from summer thunderstorms. That is scary.



    Irene is supposed to hit Maine late Sunday or early Monday. She should already be downgraded to a tropical storm by then, top sustained wind speed of 73mph. Even so, what you need to do to prepare depends on the expected wind speed, direction, and terrain that could funnel wind or protect from the wind. There is also the risk of flooding to consider. You will need to take a look in the daylight and assess your current location.



    Probably nothing to worry about at your current location if you are not in a flood plain, the awning is secure (including the one across the front), and you and your neighbors pick up anything light enough to blow around. Don't stash anything under the RV, put everything inside--the more weight inside the more stable it will be. Fill the water, holding, and propane tanks. If you have containers with lids, fill them with water, too, in case the water supply is knocked out. Might as well stock up on canned goods. Canned goods are heavy and make good ballast, and if food becomes scarce you'll be fed.



    Check any nearby trees for cracked/dead branches and get those down before the storm hits. Cut them up for firewood and stack the wood on your RV tongue and rear bumper, even if it takes a tiedown or two to keep them there. Try to turn your RV so the wind hits the front or rear--less chance to blow it over that way. Best is to hook the RV to the tow vehicle and point the rig into the wind. I expect the RV has already seen apparent wind from the front greater than 73mph. That would be the equivalent to riding down the highway at 55mph with a 15-20mph headwind.



    Jacks on boards or blocks to spread the load in mud and tight at all 4 corners to maximize load distribution. Stack objects on the windward side of the RV, for the same reason one sits on the gunwale of a sailboat. If the wind shifts and starts hitting the side instead of the ends, move all the stuff to the windward side.



    As for your TW, either load it in your tow vehicle or put it in the RV. If neither is an option, I'd use a blanket as padding, and strap the TW tight to the back bumper of the RV.



    So far, all the options I've given are free. This one will cost a bit. Auger style earth anchors at each corner. You can also bury a 4-foot long, 6+-inch diameter log at each corner about 2 feet down and fasten the RV to the logs.



    If I was the least bit uncomfortable I'd evacuate--load everything up and head west to the nearest mountains, find a spot to camp down in a valley running 90* to the expected wind direction. If this is a viable option, make sure the rig is ready to roll with minimal prep: tires aired, everything loaded and secure, tow vehicle serviced, etc.



    I'm sending ^i^ ^i^ ^i^ to calm and watch over you.




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  5. #4
    Senior Member TuggerHiller's Avatar
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    Cover it with a tarp and shoot in great stuff
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  6. #5
    Senior Member TW2007's Avatar
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    The biggest problem I had with similar strong winds is damage caused by large trees or parts of trees falling. Lost my favorite van that way, fortunately the tree did not strike the house. Get what you can into storage and I hope that you will be spared from the worst.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member peruano's Avatar
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    At the very least make sure that the bike won't tilt over because of the substrate softening or due to winds. If your bike has to sit under the awning, I'd at least put some guy wires on it to make sure its upright at the end of the blow. Place a big board under the kickstand, and use some straps to make sure it wont blow over. Good luck and stay safe. Tom
    Tom - TW200 2002, Kawasaki VN 500 2006

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  8. #7
    Senior Member ericj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmc View Post
    Although it's unlikely that Hurricane Irene's full force will hit S.VT, we're almost certain to contend with high velocity winds. My temp housing is a 24' camper; my TW's temp housing is the space under my awning with everything else that will, eventually, have a home in a garage/shed. The awning itself and all lightweight items will be secured away, somehow, but I'm wondering if folks have suggestions for how to best insure against damage (to the bike, I mean, although perhaps people have RV advice, too)?



    Tx.


    Being on the Eastern Shore of MD we are supposed to get close to a direct hit, and this whole peninsula is flat and low-lying. Glad I have a storage shed for the TW, but it may all blow away. May have to evacuate, but I won't except "maybe" if it becomes mandatory. My next door neighbor out here in the country is in a small trailer in rough condition... if they can stay my double-wide here should be OK. They have so much junk in their yard, though it might act like shrapnel.



    Got my cameras all charged up...

  9. #8
    Senior Member peter's Avatar
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    We just had a visit from Irene, Tuesday night to Wednesday morning. Wind 100mph, gusts up to 115mph. Lots and lots of rain. While my house suffered no damage, a neighbor lost over half of the roof. Went out yesterday evening to check on a friend and drove my TW through a flooded road. No problem until I hit a spot where the road was washed away and my TW died (drowned). I hope I can resurrect her later today. Let her sleep and hopefully dry a little at another friends house. Any advise? I tried to start her up without success in the water and just hope no water got into the air filter but there may be a chance it did.

  10. #9
    Member lorddaftbiker's Avatar
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    Peter, the thing that you don't want to happen is for water to get into the combustion chamber through the air intake. When water does this, your engine becomes "hydrauliced." This is a condition where water gets sucked into the combustion chamber, the intake & exhaust valves close, then the piston comes up, tries to compress the water (which doesn't compress, by the way) and then something breaks.



    If you think you have water in your combustion chamber, pull the spark plug out & then crank the engine to make the water squirt out the spark plug hole. Make sure all the water is out before you screw the spark plug back in.



    You should also make sure the air filter element is clean & dry & make sure there's no water in the crankcase. If you have water in the crankcase, you should change the oil & oil filter. Check/do all this stuff before you try to start your bike again. Good luck, hope your bike's o.k.



    -Lorddaftbiker

  11. #10
    Senior Member peter's Avatar
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    Took spark plug out, cranked her up a few times, changed the oil (still no motor cycle oil but a Forum member was kind enough to ship 6 qts which I will get next week, nice isn't it? Great forum!!)cleaned oil filter and stainer, cleaned air filter, element, put graphite on chain, kept my fingers crossed and started her up. Not a cough!!!! Just a nice and clean start.Took her for a little spin and now there is one happy TW owner again!!!



    Thanks for all the advise

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