Pulsing Sensation From Rear Brake Pedal - 2004 Model
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  1. #1
    Member sfsccoter's Avatar
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    Just picked up a 2004 TW200 with only 600 miles on it. Didn't really take it through a decent test ride, but did notice a pulsing sensation through my foot on the rear brake pedal after I got it home and rode it around a bit more. Anyone have any idea what it could be? I know that it has been down before, but probably not at more than 10-20mph, based on the very light scuffing. I have owned a lot of other bikes and have never experienced this pulsing sensation before. Is something out of whack with the rear drum and, if so, how difficult is it to take it apart and have a look? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Rusty drum, most likely. Take the rear wheel off, remove the backing plate and scuff off any rust you see in there. Could be a few other things but if the bike has been sitting that's the most likely.



    You'll need to get in there then tell us what you see.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Xracer's Avatar
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    Just a guess but perhaps the pad came loose from the shoe. I've seen it happen.

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  5. #4
    Senior Member peruano's Avatar
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    Usually folks address pulsing sensations from the rear with Preparation H. No itching and less need to lubricate the chain as often. BTW, pay attention to answers 1 and 2, and ignore this one. Tom
    Tom - TW200 2002, Kawasaki VN 500 2006

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  6. #5
    Member sfsccoter's Avatar
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by lizrdbrth View Post
    Rusty drum, most likely. Take the rear wheel off, remove the backing plate and scuff off any rust you see in there. Could be a few other things but if the bike has been sitting that's the most likely.



    You'll need to get in there then tell us what you see.


    Thanks for the suggestion, makes sense since it has been sitting the majority of its' life. I don't have a stand or jack, so getting the rear wheel off will be a bit of a challenge. When I do get one, will I require a special type of socket to get the axle bolt off (all I have is a cheap set from Target)? Wish I had an impact wrench but no luck there either. Might be a silly question, but if I ride it for a while as is will the rust (assuming that's the issue) just get scraped away and make the pulsing disappear ? I know I should get in there asap, but it always takes me 4-5 times longer than what I think to get mechanical issues resolved and I can't devote that much time to it w/o putting it out of commission for a few days.

  7. #6
    Member sfsccoter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xracer View Post
    Just a guess but perhaps the pad came loose from the shoe. I've seen it happen.


    Hopefully I'll take it apart soon and diagnose what's going on. The rear brake does work, just not a comfortable feeling when using it. Thanks for the suggestion.



    On a side note, it is completely stock so I need to the carb rework (jet, idle adjustment, rubber spacers/rings). It really does run very lean and makes it a real pain for those short trips where the bike hasn't even warmed up in the time it would take you to get to your destination a mile or 2 away. I have a Vino 125 for that purpose for now but will most likely sell it down the line so that the TW will be the only 2 wheeler in the stable.

  8. #7
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Not difficult or time consuming.Support it on a milk crate er sumpin up under the skidplate. Remove the brake rod wingnut and spring and set aside.



    Loosen the axle nut and push the wheel all the way forward. Lift the chain off the sprocket and lay it over the swingarm. Remove the axle nut, pull out the axle and slide the wheel out of the bike to the rear.



    Lay the wheel over on the sproket side, lift out the brake assembly and take a look inside.



    If the inside of the drum is rusted you can use your thumb on a small piece of 80 grit and lightly sand it off.



    If it's anything other than that come back in here and describe it to us and we'll walk you through it.



    Riding the rust away isn't the greatest plan. It'll grind your drum and shoes or hang around as dust, reducing your braking power.



    Get the thing mechanically squared end-to-end away before you go dinking around with jetting and such. Odds are the carb needs a good cleaning before you can make any judgement about that.



    You've got other wheels. Get on it



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  9. #8
    Member sfsccoter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizrdbrth View Post
    Not difficult or time consuming.Support it on a milk crate er sumpin up under the skidplate. Remove the brake rod wingnut and spring and set aside.



    Loosen the axle nut and push the wheel all the way forward. Lift the chain off the sprocket and lay it over the swingarm. Remove the axle nut, pull out the axle and slide the wheel out of the bike to the rear.



    Lay the wheel over on the sproket side, lift out the brake assembly and take a look inside.



    If the inside of the drum is rusted you can use your thumb on a small piece of 80 grit and lightly sand it off.



    If it's anything other than that come back in here and describe it to us and we'll walk you through it.



    Riding the rust away isn't the greatest plan. It'll grind your drum and shoes or hang around as dust, reducing your braking power.



    Get the thing mechanically squared end-to-end away before you go dinking around with jetting and such. Odds are the carb needs a good cleaning before you can make any judgement about that.



    You've got other wheels. Get on it


    Thanks a bunch for the detailed directions, greatly appreciated. You're definitely right about getting this done before I mess with the carb. I test rode another one that sat most of its life before I bought this one. That particular one wouldn't idle properly w/o giving it plenty of gas. Would always die a second or two after letting go of the throttle. Had very low mileage too, lowlife seller kept on insisting that it was in mint condition but it looked like hell in addition to running like sh*t. Couldn't walk away fast enough. Pretty sure the one I bought is just running like it should in its stock state, i.e. very lean and cold blooded. I also have a DR200SE with the Kientech mods (jetted and pipe/airbox opened up) and it runs so much better than the TW. Feels like there is so much more torque. Hoping to get the TW to run as nicely as the DR200SE.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    As I move past 60, it almost seems to be a 'law of physics'; any task taken on by yourself, takes 4 times as long as was expected. What you save in money, you pay in time......... Gerry
    Take care my Friend.........

  11. #10
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrgizmow View Post
    As I move past 60, it almost seems to be a 'law of physics'; any task taken on by yourself, takes 4 times as long as was expected. What you save in money, you pay in time......... Gerry
    +1




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