Is this a good deal for a socket set?
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  1. #1
    Senior Member ceramite's Avatar
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    Sears metric socket set



    I have no tools other than a basic kit. Would this be good for working on Duke? Oh, my wife named my bike Duke. So I have to message her that I am taking Duke out for a walk when she is not at home. Anyways, tools.



    This kit has a non floppy Uni-Grip Superman. Pretty awesome!



    (I am sorry, this should be in Tech Help)



    Thank you

    Adam







    Product listing:



    Product Description



    26 pc. Uni-Grip Metric Socket Set contains 21 Uni-Grip sockets in 1/2 in. Drive size. Includes: 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 30 and 32mm sockets; 2 Uni-Grip Extension bars (125 & 250mm); 1 Uni-Grip Sliding T-handle; 1 Uni-Grip Superman U-joint and 1 - 2.5 degree Nano-ratchet handle.



    Uni-Grip socket:

    Uni-Grip raised ridges along the outer surface of the sockets provide greater grip, prevent sockets from rolling, and aid in quick identification of drive sizes. 2 Ridges = 1/4 in. Drive, 3 Ridges = 3/8 in. Drive, 4 Ridges = 1/2 in. Drive.

    Highly visible large size markings on 2 to 4 places around the outer surface of the socket for quick access and storage.



    Uni-Grip extension bar:

    Flat parallel sides allowing torque to be applied with an open-end or adjustable wrench at any point along the shaft.

    Uni-Grip raised ridges along the outer surface of the extensions provide greater grip, prevent extensions from rolling, and aid in quick identification of drive sizes. 2 Ridges = 1/4 in. Drive, 3 Ridges = 3/8 in. Drive, 4 Ridges = 1/2 in. Drive.

    Laser scale along flat surface is perfect for quick measurements.



    Uni-Grip sliding T-handle:

    Hidden end stop allows drive head slide to the end of handle and minimizes the drive radius clearance.

    Semi-circle shape of handle bar prevents the drive head from rotating around the handle.

    Laser scale along flat surface is perfect for quick measurements.



    Uni-Grip Superman u-joint:

    Dual internal springs insure u-joint maintains a semi-rigid shape for insertion into tight spaces. Flexible, non floppy.



    2.5 degree Nano-ratchet handle:

    Nano-ratchet dual pawl provides a minimal 2.5 degree swing angle for working in tight spaces.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ceramite's Avatar
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    I think I found a better one.



    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...3&blockType=G3

    Craftsman 94 pc. Dual Marked Mechanics Tool Set for $60.?



    Edit - Damn, not metric.

  3. #3
    Senior Member wrench-puller's Avatar
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    Sears is O.K. but the fit is not as good as some sockets but at least they have a good over the counter replacement. Do you have any good pawn shops close by? I have picked up brand name sets for less then the cheap sets from retailers. Nothing beats the fit of a 6 point snap on socket, no rounding off bolts or bleeding knuckles. My home set is all Craftsman by sears, but my daily work tools are all Snap-on or Mac. I hear the frustration of the other mechanics that break or strip off bolts using cheap tools, and so much wasted time extracting stripped bolts. My theory is buy it once, look after it and it will last a life time. I still have a sears set I got for my 13th birthday ( Yes, they did have steel back then!). So for the TW, I would find a set of metric 6 point sockets from a brand name supplier, the rest of tne tools aren't as important for quality. Little tube of thread lock and a torque wrench and your good to go!
    2009 TW200, Jimbo shield, 47&55T rear with DID chain, Maxxis Ceros Rear, Kendra 270 front, extended swing arm, 1"Risers, Rear rack, Raised front fender, XOG GPS.

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  5. #4
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Too much money for too big a tool set. I never use 1/2-inch drive on a motorcycle. 3/8-inch drive is better, but most of the time a 1/4-inch drive is all that is necessary for maintenance items. Just starting off, you'be be much better served with a complete set of combination wrenches and an 1/4-inch drive socket set, preferably with 6-point deep sockets. The secret to a good 1/4 drive set is a quality ratchet--the cheap ones are flimsy.



    I started out with Craftsman, switched to Snap-On after the Craftsman stuff was stolen, now use Stanley from Walmart since my kids and their friends scattered the Snap-On stuff all over the neighborhood. Stanley from Walmart is a much better value. Shop Stanley at Walmart carefully. Two grades of Stanley tools are carried, and it is easy to tell the difference by looking at them. You want the good stuff that costs more. Once you can identify the good stuff in pictures (google the part number for the set), you can usually beat Walmart prices online.



    I've found anything larger than 17mm (steering stem, swingarm pivot, axles) usually is too awkward or requires more torque than I want to put on a 1/4 or 3/8 ratchet, so I use offset box wrenches or combination wrenches for those. Walmart sells Stanley wrenches, too. Get the good ones. It is cheaper in the long run to buy the biggest set you can up front--adding individual pieces gets really expensive really fast.



    I have this set and it gets the job done most of the time. I bought this set to replace a bigger set, but it's disappeared, probably because my son-in-law "borrowed" without asking. This is what I want for Christmas, and if Santa doesn't bring it, I'll probably buy it myself. I can't hardly read the etched sizes on chrome sockets anymore.




  6. #5
    Senior Member ceramite's Avatar
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    I knew I could get expert advice, thank you guys!! I have a better idea what I should be looking for now. I took off my plastics on Friday using a leatherman.... uhhhaaa not so smart.



    I will window shop a fair bit before getting something. But I will probably go for the $44 Stanley, that is in my price range and I will have a few bucks to get locktight and a torque wrench.



    qwerty- I hope Santa gets you that black chrome set, that is nice!! I will put in a good word for you at the mall, Santa likes gin in general.



    Thank you again gents!

    Adam

  7. #6
    Member praeses's Avatar
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    I started writing a big response but I figure I'll try this again and make it short. I hear nothing but great reviews from the better Stanley stuff and Snap-on (mostly Snap-on) like from both wrench-puller and Qwerty.



    The way I figure is make sure you always have the right tool, then get the best tool. Luckily with motorbikes you really don't need huge sets, they're a pain to sort/clean/lug around anyways. 3/8" Metric does wonders. The one thing I have against Stanley is the ratchet heads are big, sometimes you have to take more stuff off to get the tools to fit.
    2008 TW200 Yamaha luggage rack w/small el-cheapo JC Whitney trunk and large tool tube, Jimbo Shield, re-wired headlight, Blaster Shock waiting to be installed.

    1989 TW200 Work in Progress

    1994 ZX6E (rebuilt transmission, then rebuilt replacement motor, then rebuilt transmission in replacement motor, fun fun) large JC Whitney trunk fixed to the back of a computer chair re-welded to make a nifty luggage rack

  8. #7
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    The Chanellock tool sets at Costco are a very good deal and have a nice "feel". Probably more than you want to spend but a smokin' deal for 1/4" thru 1/2" drive, metric and standard and a ton of extras like decent quality needlenose pliers, allen wrenches, 12v test light, etc.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  9. #8
    Senior Member MrDNA's Avatar
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    Guys, he said that he didn't have ANY tools!



    Technically, the second set is a way better deal than the first choice. A few bucks more @ $54 and you get a full set of 1/4 and 3/8th sockets in both metric and USA and two ratchets and an extension. Plus you get a couple open end wrenches, a couple of deep well sockets and a full set of Allen wrenches and driver tips.



    Don't get hung up on the ratchet swivel, that's maybe $10 bucks. Add a 19mm & 22mm socket, and a decent set of metric wrenches and this will bring you close to being able to bring the bike down to it's frame.



    IMHO
    Something witty...



    2005 & 2010 TW200

  10. #9
    Senior Member ceramite's Avatar
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    I am a pretty decisive guy, but when buying toys for myself I am easily swayed back and forth.

    (I am looking up everything that is suggested, thank you!!)



    I guess the bigger question is what tools are essential for doing maintenance work.? Do you guys use the Owner's Tool kit, or is that just an Oh S**T kit?



    edit:

    Sorry MrDNA, I was typing when you posted. You are right, I don't squat unless you count the picture framing kit I have. Or I can make a 4 hour drive and raid my dad's tools (he isn't sending them voluntary!). I do own a shotgun, do I gain any man points back?

  11. #10
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Best to hold some of the tools in your hands and see how they feel to you. Maybe find some folks who have tools and give a few brands a twirl. Snap-On makes the best feeling hand impact for me, and the better Stanley screwdrivers feel best to me of anything. I like the Craftsman ratchets best. When I win the lottery I'll be building an integrated neighborhood in my toolbox. S-K, Snap-On, Craftsman, Mac, and ChanelLock all make good tools, but some have a cheaper Chinese line that should be avoided. Good tools are not cheap, they are priceless. Cheap tools are worthless.




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