Cheap 280 piece stainless steel allen head bolt kit for TW
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  1. #1
    Junior Member liberia's Avatar
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    I thought I would pass along that I got what I believe is an exceptional price on a complete TW200 allen bolts kit form a company called Bolt Me Up LLP (www.BOLTMEUP.com) in England. I'm not sure where I ran across it (maybe ebay) but they had a 280 piece allen bolt kit for about $16 DELIVERED. I ordered it on 9/27 and received them a couple of days ago. Everything looks to be good quality. I was a little apprehensive after I ordered because it didn't give me a delivery fee (just tax of about 15%). But sure enough they sent it regular mail and it got here in about 2 weeks.



    They have bolt kits for all kind of autos, boats and motorcycles plus some general purpose kits. I haven't used any of the bolts yet but think they will be a great replacement set as I rebuild my wife's 2000 TW.



    Just thought I would share this in case anyone was interested.

  2. #2
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Cool. Use some Nevr-Sieze or Milk of Magnesia on all 280 of them.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member 805gregg's Avatar
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    Check them with a magnet, probably Chinese junk, unless you are on a boat no need for stainless.

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  5. #4
    Senior Member ceramite's Avatar
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    I would like to hear a follow up when you get them!

  6. #5
    Member motorhead's Avatar
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    With no dis-respect...I too concern myself on the quality of "After market" fasteners....especially from CHINA

  7. #6
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Poor quality stainless is a safer bet than high quality stainless when screwed into aluminum.



    How's that for diplomacy?



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  8. #7
    Senior Member rm_hm's Avatar
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    Anyone else tried these bolts yet, if so are they magnetic?



    Some other bolt kit links



    http://www.ecrater.c...ished-stainless



    http://compare.ebay....&_lwgsi=y&cbt=y



    http://www.z1enterpr...t-900-2519.aspx



    I wonder what type and grade of stainless they use



    • Austenitic, or 300 series, stainless steels make up over 70% of total stainless steel production. They contain a maximum of 0.15% carbon, a minimum of 16% chromium and sufficient nickel and/or manganese to retain an austenitic structure at all temperatures from the cryogenic region to the melting point of the alloy. A typical composition of 18% chromium and 10% nickel, commonly known as 18/10 stainless, is often used in flatware. 18/0 and 18/8 are also available.




    Superaustenitic stainless steels, such as alloy AL-6XN and 254SMO, exhibit great resistance to chloride pitting and crevice corrosion because of high molybdenum content (>6%) and nitrogen additions, and the higher nickel content ensures better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking versus the 300 series. The higher alloy content of superaustenitic steels makes them more expensive. Other steels can offer similar performance at lower cost and are preferred in certain applications, for example ASTM A387 is used in pressure vessels but is a low alloy carbon steel with a chromium content of 0.5% to 9%. [18] Low-carbon versions, for example 316L or 304L, are used to avoid corrosion problems caused by welding. Grade 316LVM is preferred where biocompatibility is required (such as body implants and piercings).[19] The "L" means that the carbon content of the alloy is below 0.03%, which reduces the sensitization effect (precipitation of chromium carbides at grain boundaries) caused by the high temperatures involved in welding.





    • Ferritic stainless steels generally have better engineering properties than austenitic grades, but have reduced corrosion resistance, because of the lower chromium and nickel content. They are also usually less expensive. They contain between 10.5% and 27% chromium and very little nickel, if any, but some types can contain lead. Most compositions include molybdenum; some, aluminium or titanium. Common ferritic grades include 18Cr-2Mo, 26Cr-1Mo, 29Cr-4Mo, and 29Cr-4Mo-2Ni. These alloys can be degraded by the presence of σ chromium, an intermetallic phase which can precipitate upon welding.


    Martensitic stainless steels are not as corrosion-resistant as the other two classes but are extremely strong and tough, as well as highly machinable, and can be hardened by heat treatment. Martensitic stainless steel contains chromium (12–14%), molybdenum (0.2–1%), nickel (less than 2%), and carbon (about 0.1–1%) (giving it more hardness but making the material a bit more brittle). It is quenched and magnetic.







    Precipitation-hardening martensitic stainless steels have corrosion resistance comparable to austenitic varieties, but can be precipitation hardened to even higher strengths than the other martensitic grades. The most common, 17-4PH, uses about 17% chromium and 4% nickel. The Lockheed-Martin Joint Strike Fighter is the first aircraft to use a precipitation-hardenable stainless steel—Carpenter Custom 465—in its airframe.



    • Duplex stainless steels have a mixed microstructure of austenite and ferrite, the aim usually being to produce a 50/50 mix, although in commercial alloys the ratio may be 40/60. Duplex stainless steels have roughly twice the strength compared to austenitic stainless steels and also improved resistance to localized corrosion, particularly pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. They are characterized by high chromium (19–32%) and molybdenum (up to 5%) and lower nickel contents than austenitic stainless steels.


    The properties of duplex stainless steels are achieved with an overall lower alloy content than similar-performing super-austenitic grades, making their use cost-effective for many applications. Duplex grades are characterized into groups based on their alloy content and corrosion resistance.


  9. #8
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    If stainless bolts are magnetic, they probably aren't stainless.




  10. #9
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Cheap stainless contains less nickel and more iron and therefore will be magnetic.



    If stainless bolts are magnetic the combination will react SLIGHTLY less corrosively when screwed into aluminum.



    So cheap stainless is preferable to good stainless, if you gotta have stainless.



    This subject tends to cause warfare, but look at a Galvanic Table and weigh the info.



    I'd use them only where stainless meets steel, but if you gotta use them on aluminum for looks I'd limit them to things like engine side covers, valve covers, etc. which stand a chance of frequent removal and only in combination with liberal amounts of anti-sieze. Never on things like case halves, cylinders bolts, and such.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  11. #10
    Senior Member JagLite's Avatar
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    I have no experience with SS bolts in motorcycle engines but I do have with outboard motors used in salt water.

    The manufacturers use ss since the bolts would rust immediately if they used regular steel bolts.



    The only time we had problems were the long neglected engines where the bolts had corroded into the aluminum, or rather, the aluminum corrodes, expands, and freezes the bolt solid. When you attempt to remove the bolt it shears off the head. Trying to drill out a ss bolt in an aluminum case is the pits.



    However, considering that many of the bolts in the aluminum outboard engine are ss and very few caused problems I wouldn't avoid them for motorcycle use on my bikes. But just for exterior bolts as was suggested.
    James

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