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  1. #1
    Junior Member Under Dog's Avatar
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    Guys,



    I'm a street rider who picked up a TW last weekend (my first off road bike EVER). Title, reg, and insurance this week. I'd really like to go riding this weekend on some of our forest/logging roads, but have no idea as to what gear I should pick up. I've got a street helmet, jacket, and gloves, but am assuming I shouldn't use those off road. So, what all do you use or recommend?



    Thanks,

    Doug

    Portland, OR

  2. #2
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    It might be better if you described what you already have. Dirt gear and street gear needn't necessarily be mutually exclusive.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    There was a good post put together by a fellar here that outlined a lot of great gear and where to get it. Maybe dig up that thread for some ideas.



    I just bought a good certified armored jacket with decent reviews (axo enduro) that has a zip out thermal liner for cold days, and zippered mesh vents for hot days. Then what they call a "dual sport helmet" made by afx with a visor and flipup shield. After that, a pair of mechanics gloves withb rubber armored fingers... already had steel toe leather work boots.



    As lizrdbrth said though, if you have a helmet/jacket/gloves, you might not really need much of anything unless you only have a skid lid or something. I also actually started with a full leather jacket but it was very very hot to wear offroad. Ideally you want stuff that is comfy so you will be more likely to actually, you know, wear it
    ITCB

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  5. #4
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    I've ridden thousands of dirt road miles in mesh street gear with soccer shin guards and composite safety toe and shank work boots. I prefer a plain ol' MX helmet and goggles--can't see paying all that money for a dualsport helmet that means lugging around all the extra features (weight) I won't be using. But then, I'm old and don't get in any particular hurry.




  6. #5
    Senior Member 805gregg's Avatar
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    Get good moto gear, hiking boats won't cut it on a low side on asphalt, you need CE armor on both sides of your shins, and a good moto jacket or at least under jacket armor, shoulder, elbow, and knee protection, spine protection is also good. There is a saying ATTGAT "all the gear all the time" which I always practice. I like to ride either on or off road in my Arrowstich suit it covers all my vital areas and goes on and off in 10 seconds, and is good from 40 to 110 degrees, expensive but whats your skin and body parts worth? Not to mention down time, cost and recovery if your not protected. I use Oxtar Infinity Boats, tall with great protection and comfortable, I can wear them walking around all day. I over kill but if it saves me, that's great and I'm 62 so I don't have any time left for recovery, it's all got to be good times. My instructor at the MFS course said you've either crashed or will crash, if I go down it will be with the best gear I can afford.

  7. #6
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    Qwerty my helmet was actually one of the cheapest I could find with decent reviews, of any style, that was safety rated by both US and european rating agencies. Manufacturer came out with a new model and it was on sale cheapcheap. Always looking for deals because my budget is almost not existant
    ITCB

  8. #7
    Junior Member Under Dog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizrdbrth View Post
    It might be better if you described what you already have. Dirt gear and street gear needn't necessarily be mutually exclusive.




    LOL. Ok, I have a street helmet, jacket, and gloves... More specifically, Arai fullface helmet, Joe Rocket padded/armored jacket, leather gloves. Sounds like I should get a good set of boots, a chest protector, and some decent shin guards.



    I'll probably hit one of the local shops over the weekend. It's just that I don't trust a salesman to tell me what I "really" need...

  9. #8
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    What's best for one style of riding isn't what's best for another. Generally, what works for motorcross wiorks for trail riding, with a few exceptions.



    Believe it or not, for trail riding a TW you don't want SNELL. SNELL is for young, strong men racing fast cars and motorcycles whose heads are likely to suffer multiple collisions in a single incident. Energy levels for resistance to destruction for SNELL compliance are much higher than energy levels for DOT compliance. SNELL helmets must stand up to energy levels that will destroy a DOT helmet. It is the destruction of the helmet that absorbs energy before it reaches your head rather than transfers energy to your head. For our purposes, we are better protected with a cheap, destructible helmet that barely meets DOT criteria than an expensive, practically indestructible number with a host of certifications.



    Motocross boots have smooth soles to allow sliding in curves. Trail riding boots need traction soles because when the feet hit the ground it's usually to keep the bike standing up. Very difficult to hold the bike up in slick mud with smooth soles. ATV boots provide the protection of motocross boots and traction soles. They are the best choice for most people who trail ride at moderate speeds.



    Motocross gloves are covered with rubber or metal armor to protect from flying rocks. Those who trail ride at a leisurely pace need worry more about branches than flying rocks. Therefore, trail riders lean towards brush guards mounted on the handle bars and select gloves that provide good grip, abrasion protection in case of a get-off, and long term comfort.



    These are small but important differences that can make or break your day.




  10. #9
    Junior Member Under Dog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qwerty View Post
    What's best for one style of riding isn't what's best for another. Generally, what works for motorcross wiorks for trail riding, with a few exceptions.



    Believe it or not, for trail riding a TW you don't want SNELL. SNELL is for young, strong men racing fast cars and motorcycles whose heads are likely to suffer multiple collisions in a single incident. Energy levels for resistance to destruction for SNELL compliance are much higher than energy levels for DOT compliance. SNELL helmets must stand up to energy levels that will destroy a DOT helmet. It is the destruction of the helmet that absorbs energy before it reaches your head rather than transfers energy to your head. For our purposes, we are better protected with a cheap, destructible helmet that barely meets DOT criteria than an expensive, practically indestructible number with a host of certifications.



    Motocross boots have smooth soles to allow sliding in curves. Trail riding boots need traction soles because when the feet hit the ground it's usually to keep the bike standing up. Very difficult to hold the bike up in slick mud with smooth soles. ATV boots provide the protection of motocross boots and traction soles. They are the best choice for most people who trail ride at moderate speeds.



    Motocross gloves are covered with rubber or metal armor to protect from flying rocks. Those who trail ride at a leisurely pace need worry more about branches than flying rocks. Therefore, trail riders lean towards brush guards mounted on the handle bars and select gloves that provide good grip, abrasion protection in case of a get-off, and long term comfort.



    These are small but important differences that can make or break your day.








    THANK YOU qwerty! Great info!!!

  11. #10
    Senior Member TK200's Avatar
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    I use Propper BDU's when I ride, they have velcro strips at the elbows and knees for inserting knee and elbow protection. Where are you located at and what kind of sizing are you? I may have an old pair I would shed tears parting with for the cost of shipping but I also have many pairs.

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