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Thread: WOT Top Speed = 68 MPH

  1. #1
    Senior Member ezman671's Avatar
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    Very unscientific top speed test.



    1996 TW - New 15/50 o-ring chain and sprockets a week or so ago. TW31 / TW34 tires with less than 1000 miles on them.



    Rider about 200 lbs. Course I-95 in Florida. Altitude change +- 0.75 inches, Very calm wind. 85 degrees. Little traffic it was early Sunday morning.



    No crouching or seat hugging. Just riding in upright position.



    Wide Open Throttle over about 5 miles. Speedo indicated 68 mph. GPS 65 Very steady with only needle width wobbling a few times.



    TW ran great with no problems during or after the run.



    The secret to running high RPM on these engines is to just do it.



    At first it sounds like it will explode any second but after the rider gets use to it the high engine speed just sounds normal.



    Ear plugs also help!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Dark Sol's Avatar
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    Sounds about like mine.



    2001 TW, 14/47 gearing with o-ring chain, TW203/204 road tires. 160 pounds no hugging, no wind - 75 degrees - 70 mph maximum. The speed gauge is 100% accurate so this is a true 70 mph. I hit 75 down a steep hill, but I'm almost certain this would never happen on any flat land. A long enough steep enough hill would definitely let the bike hit red line in 5th, which should be 79-80 mph.



    With the right amount of wind and/or hills, the bike may struggle to hit 55-60, which really sucks and kills the bikes highway ability for real-world riding in any condition - that'sn why I say screw the highway and use the TW as a backroad blaster!
    2008 CRF230L

    2006 CBR1000RR

    2007 CB919 - 70k Miles and still runs like new!

    * 2001 TW200 (Sold after 15k miles of fun)

  3. #3
    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    The tach says 9,000 rpm and the speedo says 60 mph on my TW. 14/55 sprockets. I have gone many miles doing this and it doesn't seem to hurt anything, at least not yet.
    Long live the internal combustion engine!

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  5. #4
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    15/47, 203/204, downhill, behind a semi, tucked, 84mph.

    15/50, 203/34, flat, no wind, sitting, 68mph.

    15/50, 203/34, flat, no wind, tucked, 72mph.

    15/50, 203/34, flat, no wind, tucked, following SUV, 78mph.

    Running on E10 instead of E0, minus all speeds ~6mph.

    Little things make a lot of difference.




  6. #5
    Senior Member ezman671's Avatar
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    I was running E0 fuel.



    Will try it someday when I have E10 in the tank.



    I am lucky. I have a local station that only sells E0.



    The E10 knocks my gas mileage down to about 60 mpg or less. E0 is up 70 mpg+

  7. #6
    Senior Member ericj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ezman671 View Post
    Very unscientific top speed test.



    1996 TW - New 15/50 o-ring chain and sprockets a week or so ago. TW31 / TW34 tires with less than 1000 miles on them.



    Rider about 200 lbs. Course I-95 in Florida. Altitude change +- 0.75 inches, Very calm wind. 85 degrees. Little traffic it was early Sunday morning.



    No crouching or seat hugging. Just riding in upright position.



    Wide Open Throttle over about 5 miles. Speedo indicated 68 mph. GPS 65 Very steady with only needle width wobbling a few times.



    TW ran great with no problems during or after the run.



    The secret to running high RPM on these engines is to just do it.



    At first it sounds like it will explode any second but after the rider gets use to it the high engine speed just sounds normal.



    Ear plugs also help!


    Someone I think on this forum described the engine sound as an old sewing machine... which is what it reminds me of, and that's when it's running good. The weird thing I think is that at least mine has sounds that seem to come and go sometimes, but it runs great and I think non-ethanol gas helps a bit.

  8. #7
    Senior Member phazer's Avatar
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    whats the E10 and E0 that people are talking about? i dont see any labels on the gas pumps up here in CT that have those codes on them.

  9. #8
    Senior Member rm_hm's Avatar
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    There are several common ethanol fuel mixtures in use around the world. The use of pure hydrous or anhydrous ethanol in internal combustion engines (ICE) is only possible if the engine is designed or modified for that purpose. Anhydrous ethanol can be blended withgasoline (petrol) in various ratios for use in unmodified gasoline engines, and with minor modifications can also be used with a higher content of ethanol.



    Ethanol fuel mixtures have "E" numbers which describe the percentage of ethanol fuel in the mixture by volume, for example, E85 is 85%anhydrous ethanol and 15% gasoline. Low ethanol blends, from E5 to E25, are also known as gasohol, though internationally the most common use of the term gasohol refers to the E10 blend.



    Blends of E10 or less are used in more than twenty countries around the world by 2011, led by the United States, where almost all retail gasoline sold in 2010 was blended with 10% of ethanol. Blends from E20 to E25 have been used in Brazil since the late 1970s. E85 is commonly used in the U.S. and Europe for flexible-fuel vehicles. Hydrous ethanol or E100 is used in Brazilian neat ethanol vehicles and flex-fuel light vehicles and in hydrous E15 called hE15 for modern petrol cars in Netherlands.[1]





    E10 or less

    E10, sometimes called gasohol, is a fuel mixture of 10% anhydrous ethanol and 90% gasoline that can be used in the internal combustion engines of most modern automobiles andlight-duty vehicles without need for any modification on the engine or fuel system. E10 blends are typically rated as 2 to 3 octane higher than regular gasoline and are approved for use in all new US automobiles, and are mandated in some areas for emissions and other reasons.[2] The E10 blend and lower ethanol content mixtures have been used in several countries, and its use has been primarily driven by the several world energy crises that have taken place since the 1973 oil crisis.



    Other common blends include E5 and E7. These concentrations are generally safe for recent engines that run on pure gasoline. As of 2006, mandates for blending bioethanol into vehicle fuels had been enacted in at least 36 states/provinces and 17 countries at the national level, with most mandates requiring a blend of 10 to 15% ethanol with gasoline.[3]



    One way to measure alternative fuels in the US is the "gasoline-equivalent gallons" (GEG). In 2002, the U.S. used as fuel an amount of ethanol equal to 137,000 terajoules (TJ), the energy equivalent of 1.13 billion gallons (4.3 billion liters) of gasoline. This was less than 1% of the total fuel used that year.[4]



    E10 and other blends of ethanol are considered to be useful in decreasing US dependence on foreign oil, and can reduce carbon monoxide(CO) emissions by 20 to 30% under the right conditions.[5] Although E10 does decrease emissions of CO and greenhouse gases such asCO2 by an estimated 2% over regular gasoline, it can cause increases in evaporative emissions and some pollutants depending on factors like the age of the vehicle and weather conditions.[6] According to the Philippine Department of Energy, the use of not more than a 10% ethanol-gasoline mixture is not harmful to cars' fuel systems.[7] Generally, automobile gasoline containing alcohol (ethanol or methanol) is not allowed to be used in U.S. certificated aircraft.[8]









    E15



    E15 contains 15% ethanol and 85% gasoline. This is generally the highest ratio of ethanol to gasoline that is possible to use in vehicles recommended by auto manufacturers to run on E10 in the U.S.[47][48]



    compared to the miles per gallon achieved by the gasoline only (E0) test vehicles.In March 2009 a lobbying group from the ethanol industry, Growth Energy, formally requested the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to allow the ethanol content in gasoline to be increased to 15 percent from 10 percent. Organizations doing such studies included the Energy Department, the State of Minnesota, theRenewable Fuels Association, the Rochester Institute of Technology, the Minnesota Center for Automotive Research, and Stockholm University in Sweden.[51]As a result of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which mandates an increase in renewable fuels for the transport sector, theU.S. Department of Energy began assessments for the feasibility of using intermediate ethanol blends in the existing vehicle fleet as a way to allow higher consumption of ethanol fuel.[49] The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted tests to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends on legacy vehicles and other engines.[49][50] In a preliminary report released in October 2008, the NREL presented the results of the first evaluations of the effects of E10, E15 and E20 gasoline blends on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials.[49][50] This preliminary report found that none of the vehicles displayed a malfunction indicator light as a result of the ethanol blend used; no fuel filter plugging symptoms were observed; no cold start problems were observed at 24 °C (75 °F) and 10 °C (50 °F) laboratory conditions; and as expected, all test vehicles exhibited a loss in fuel economy proportional with the lower energy density of ethanol, for example, with E20, the average reduction in fuel economy was 7.7%

















  10. #9
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr zannini View Post
    whats the E10 and E0 that people are talking about? i dont see any labels on the gas pumps up here in CT that have those codes on them.
    http://www.fuel-testers.com/state_gu...anol_laws.html



    I can tell gasoline from gasohol with 2.5% ethanol or greater by the smell. Remeber that pro-ethanol parties make unsubstantiated claims, often with phrases like "under certain conditions" and "in many cases". Fact is, polluting the gasoline supply with ethanol actually increases the amount of real gasoline consumed, increases all types of life-cycle pollution over that of gasoline, increases the cost of food, causes damage to vehicles that use the tainted gasoline, causes damage to vehicles that transport the ethanol to retailers, increases the national debt, etc. Facts show ethanol as forced on Americans is a boondoggle that enriches farmers, corporations involved in manufacturing ethanol, and the politicians they own.



    GaryL likes this.

  11. #10
    Senior Member ezman671's Avatar
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    I am surprised the station near me is able to sell it at all and expect the gas police to shut him down.



    I think in Florida they passed a law that all stations will sell e-10.



    I believe the only legal way for a station to sell real gas is to only allow it to be pumped into temp containers. Not directly into autos.



    Any station who allows cars to fill up directly from the real gas pumps are breaking Florida law.



    I hope I am wrong on all this, but I think this is the case.



    What a sad situation we have put our self in on so many fronts. I fear for our grand kids.

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