How to spot the nipped and tucked scars of an abused T-Dub
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  1. #1
    Senior Member Malkop's Avatar
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    This come from my post in the good mechanic thread.





    Let me tell you about Andy who was with Yamaha for 15 years then the dealership that deals with kust about every other brand for another 15 years. After a battle with cancer he now works at home semi-retired. He got my first T-Dub running when I discovered that its Cdi had been stolen at the auction and the old Indian Raven put me onto him when I balked at the price of a new one. He had a few amongst his things in his garage.



    I took my new prospect the old Babe around to him for an opinion before settling on the deal as agreed by the owner who had bought it from a dealer and had pottered around the farm for a couple of years but knew nothing about bikes. Andy climbed into it for an afternoon and an evening pulled out the carb and disembowlelled the ignition, got her running nicely advised me that the poor old girl had been worked near to death and had been given a facelift by another guy in town who could not get her running right and used to come to Andy to milk him for info while dressing mutton as lamb. He advised me not to buy her and charged =$40 for his time. When I fetched her he showed me what to look out for when a TW has been abused.



    I’ll take some pics and put this experience up on another thread for public information. (This is it as promised) The same day there was another TDub for sale and I went to look at it. It turned out it was the dirty dealer now working from home since his garage went bankrupt. I looked at the bike and pointed out the nicely painted over welds that are the scars of past abuse. He looked distinctly uncomfortable. I smiled to myself thinking how lucky to have Andy to add to the wealth of experience on this forum. Andy said he’ll go with me to look at any future prospects since he has plenty of time on his hands and can’t work a 9 hour day for anyone anymore.


    Here is the one I just looked at that the Duco artist is selling and politely rejected







    Here is the welded and painted scar on the poor old babe.








    Andy says this is common and that the TW was brought out as a leisure family bike, not a working bike. This happens when careless workers tear her around the farm and teenagers try and make her into a motorcross or enduro bike. He reckons that she is not made for standing on th pegs and jumping, but for sitting on the seats, cruising anlong the trail at a leisurely pace and letting the shocks, well, take the shock.



    I gathered as much when I tried an enduro ride a while back.



    Also look out for odd bolts indicating lots of repairs badly done probably plus worn sidestands and a bike that leans too far over as a result. A paint job is the first alarm bell though.



    Andy reckons the TW is soft and not really up to what Africa and the Africans can throw at a bike. He also says that the TW is not a simple to fix as it could be, wastes horse power on rubber and sprocket bearings and teases owners that if you had a lisp, TW stands for Tewibble Wubbish. I was a bit hurt, but took it on the chin.



    I hope this is helpful info. I could have used it a while back.



    Malcolm
























    Hre

  2. #2
    Junior Member Udoug's Avatar
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    What area of the bike is that pic showing?

    Any other areas on the frame or elsewhere that are tell tale for abuse?

  3. #3
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Go back and tell your opinionated "expert" that other bikes forego traction and safety to gain performance. Different strokes for different folks/



    TWs really are built for liesurely cruising offroad. Duh. I'll wager a TW will survive on a motocross track significantly longer than your butt will survive leisurely cruising unpaved roads on a MX bike. My experience is that MX bike riders spend so much time stopped for crashes and to wake up their butts that a TW will often beat them on a cross-country ride. At the end of the day a T-dubber will be ready for a shower and a steak, and the MXers will be ready for a shower and a tube of Bengay.




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  5. #4
    Senior Member B-dub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Torque View Post
    Andy reckons the TW is soft and not really up to what Africa and the Africans can throw at a bike. He also says that the TW is not a simple to fix as it could be, wastes horse power on rubber and sprocket bearings and teases owners that if you had a lisp, TW stands for Tewibble Wubbish. I was a bit hurt, but took it on the chin.
    No doubt that Andy is a fine mechanic, as you've said. No doubt he's seen his share of abused motorcycles, working as a professional motorcycle mechanic for that many years. But, I'll bet he's never ridden a TW where the extra rubber made a difference. The fact the TW has been produced and sold relatively unchanged for almost 25 years means it has something going for it. The success of this forum also indicates there are plenty of people that are happy with their "Tewible Wubbish". I know I am. My experience has been that the TW is pretty easy to work on, and a lot of fun to ride. I'm not likely to give mine up any time soon.
    My handle is B-dub, I ride a T-dub, and drive a V-dub.

  6. #5
    Senior Member bbagwell's Avatar
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    They have there limitations just like any other bike. I love riding mine that is all that matters to me. I know someone who has about 50 years of expereince riding motorcycles and he is looking to buy a t-dub. After crashing his KLR 650 in the dirt he wants to get a tw 200. He doesn't think he would have crashed on a t-dub due to the lower center of gravity and wider tires.
    Bryan Bagwell

    1995 Yamaha TW200

    1983 Toyota PU

    2002 Suzuki Grand Vitara

  7. #6
    Member Fourcycle's Avatar
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    I've been deeper into my TW than most and though I don't consider it Wubbish it's not that great either. It's basic, it's functional' it's old technology, it has bearings in all the right places and the rear tire is overkill for most riders but it looks cool. I bought mine because I wanted a simple bike that's easy to wrench on that got good mileage and was lighter then my CX650 or BMW. It's basically a beefy mountain bike with a good lawnmower engine in it and I like it.
    If your only tool is a hammer

    Everything looks like a nail

  8. #7
    Senior Member Malkop's Avatar
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    That's just above the footpeg on the RHS.



    Don't get me wrong. I like, no, love my T-Dub and am after another one but am getting Andy to vet them for me which has been an education in itself. I like it because its the perfect family bike which is why I have to get another because the rest of the family find her so user friendly.



    Andy's point is that when they came on the market they were advertised as a leisure and pleasure trail bike. They became popular with farmers since they were like a quad with two wheels before the four wheelers hit the market in a big way. They first came out in gay colours which are more appropriate for the seaside holiday resort than the farm. The Hondas and Suzukis had simpler easier to service motors and came stock with more armour to protect them from the rigours of working life. They aere not sexy beasts like the early T-Dubs although later models became more austere looking.



    Last night a farm manager with no helmet, just a cap, turned up at the local pub to watch rugby and parked next to my T-Dub which my son had ridden over to join us for the game. It was a pink and green model with a custom stainless exhaust like mine. It had a similar mileage as mine (20 000 km). I had a look and it was in pretty good shape. On the farm the bike runs at low revs and if its ridden sensibly can do long service like mine that came retired and amortised after 16 years of this work and is still going strong.



    The other day I had a look at a Suzuki DR200 which delivers motor spares all over, including farms. The Zulu guy rides it hard and it had 55 000 on the clock, original engine using no oil. Andy service a fleet of chest delivery bikes 100cc two strokes, some of which have done 100 000km with no repairs to the engine. Andy reckons that of the 200 Yamaha 4 strokes the recently discontinued SR has the most robust engine, but also suffer from some servicability complications. So Andy's view comes from experience and he says that the labour repair bills of the TW are higher than the competition since even a simple sprocket change is an involved operation. That is his professional opinion, but it does not change my fondness for the T-Dub, so qwerty don't get your underpants in a wad and take it all personal These are just brands of machine we are talking about, not religious idols.



    Malcolm

  9. #8
    Senior Member sorethumb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Torque View Post
    ...he says that the labour repair bills of the TW are higher than the competition since even a simple sprocket change is an involved operation.


    Then he has no credibility in my opinion.
    Custom 1998 TW200 Build Thread Hidden Content | 2003 TW200 | 2009 KLX351

  10. #9
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sorethumb View Post
    Then he has no credibility in my opinion.
    +1 Maybe a bit more involved to change a countershaft sprocket, but everything else is just about identical to every other 200cc Yamaha as far as normal maintenance goes. We don't get the Suzuki and Honda ag bikes over here. We don't even get the Yamaha AG200. I suspect the AG200 would compare more favorably to other makes on a farm than a TW. We don't use motorbikes for farming. , 4-wheelers, Super Duty pickup trucks, and John Deere tractors are the norm around here. Anyway, if everyone in your area thinks the TWs are such garbage, you ought to be able to pick them up cheap. Nothing wrong with that at all. Puts a big smile on my face thinking about how much fun you'll be having for next to nothing.




  11. #10
    Senior Member Malkop's Avatar
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    Andy charges for his time and undercharges by a long way compared to going to Yamaha or any of the other dealerships. So I guess that he finds machines that need relatively little time to service and repair are more cost effective workhorses.



    The old guy in spares at Yamaha whispered in my ear about him when I was stuck for the bucks for a new cdi. Andy got my dead TW running and then some. That's credibility to me. Also, when the new generation of part swappers at Yamaha get stuck they call him in - that must be credibility of some sort. Like I said, Andy has seen all variety of machines worked to their limits over decades in the trade and forms his opinion on the basis of that experience. Now I've only had a couple of bikes in my time and now have a T-Dub and like it better than anything else I’ve had. I don’t have much time to tinker and prefer to just ride and do a little servicing and outsource time consuming complicate stuff to an experienced expert.

    The AG 200 has the same engine as the TW I believe but both have lost out to the Suzukis and Hondas which are still stocked while the Yamahas are no longer on the floor despite competitive pricing. They are simpler to work on thus favoured.



    I think because the TW is so comfortable and user friendly, they get used until they die. So the used ones I’ve seen around here have been used up and suffered some abuse. The TW suffers from rust in our coastal cities, so have stopped looking there. There are some low mileage urban bargains to be found in Johannesburg (our biggest city), but that’s 6 hours north. But if I am up there on business I’ll get another. Like you said qwerty, the family like the bike since they feel safe on it. So its like the iron version of the perfect family pony. I am willing to take Andy’s dim view of it as a workhorse and balance that against the many +++s.

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