Check your valves! Or this can happen...
Close
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Junior Member Ktroy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southwest Virginia
    Posts
    20
    Motor was making a ticking sound, adjusted the valves.

    Motor was silky smooth quite afterwards.

    Noise returned shortly after.. figured it was normal top end sounds.

    -IGNORED IT ALL SUMMER-



    Noise became louder and more prominent so decided to check them again.

    This is what I saw on the intake valve adjustment.









    Good time for a head and top-end job, and fix that leaky base gasket

    ~$350 fix



    Anyone think I can get away with a new rocker arm adjustment screw for a few more miles? Or will I risk thrashing the top-end with metal pieces?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Xracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lake Placid,Florida
    Posts
    3,747
    Fix it right the first time. Trying to do things half way has bitten me in the butt once to many times.

  3. #3
    Senior Member TW2007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Washington
    Posts
    464
    Quote Originally Posted by Ktroy View Post
    Motor was making a ticking sound, adjusted the valves.

    Motor was silky smooth quite afterwards.

    Noise returned shortly after.. figured it was normal top end sounds.

    -IGNORED IT ALL SUMMER-



    Noise became louder and more prominent so decided to check them again.

    This is what I saw on the intake valve adjustment.









    Good time for a head and top-end job, and fix that leaky base gasket

    ~$350 fix



    Anyone think I can get away with a new rocker arm adjustment screw for a few more miles? Or will I risk thrashing the top-end with metal pieces?


    Since the top of the stem looks hammered I would avoid riding on it except in an emergency-since the stem will most likely continue to fail as the engine is run and could lead to worse problems.



    I think that there is a good chance if you replaced just the valve and what ever rocker arm pieces need replacing you would be good to go. But pull the head and take a good look at everything.





    If you did the work yourself and take the head in and have the valve ground, lapped, and seated - in I bet it would be well under $350 and you could buy some farkles for the bike or just save yourself some money.



    I bet the bike would go another 10-15k before you would have to dig into it again and if you ride 5-7k/year that's 2-3 years and should you sell the bike you would be money ahead. But if you ride 10-15K per year you might want to do the full Monty and get everything done………….good luck on what ever you decide-but do as much of this as you can.



    If you have never done anything like this before its a great learning experience and will add to your confidence in the bike. (Also, you might want to ask a knowledgeable friend help you and if proficient then NEVER MIND but it might help others should something similar come along-a good manual and a little confidence and some help from someone knowledgeable goes a long way).



    The worst problems you will run into is damaged threads and frozen bolts-they can be an adventure-but there are always fixes for those things. Also doing the work yourself gives you the option to do some extras should you elect to and still stay below the $350. In my mind a $350 shop bill equates to approximately $250 labor costs and $100 for materials, tax, and environmental waste fees.



    I'm not begrudging the shop their labor costs but I would like to save as much of this as I can-but when ever the shop has special tools that I do not have or can't afford to --- then I defer to those shops to do the work but I shop around for those shops that have a good reputation and do good work.



    I miss the days when I was in the military and was able to use their shops or when I was in high school and college and had access to their machine shops. But alas no more…..



    Just a few thoughts.



    Mike





    The TW200 may be slow but the Earth is patient.

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content


    Last Blog Entry: Plans For 2012 (01/16/12)

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements

  5. #4
    Senior Member Wheelie Nelson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by Ktroy View Post
    Motor was silky smooth quite afterwards.
    These engines buzz like sewing machines. If you have a silky smooth quiet TW200, you should be worried!

  6. #5
    Moderator vuldub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Calgary, AB Canada
    Posts
    652
    Did you overtighted the valve when you did your initial adjustment?
    Regards...Wes
    In the Stable: 73 Honda CT90,81 Honda CT110,81 Honda CT70,04 Yamaha TW200,07 Kawasaki Vulcan 1500

  7. #6
    Junior Member Ktroy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southwest Virginia
    Posts
    20
    Mike thanks for all that info! I was thinking about just pulling the cylinder and fixing the leaky base gasket and some new rings to boot. "I" as in...the bike repair shop up the road.

    I did not know it was possible to fix the valve without removing the head. I will look into this, because like you said, 10-15k more miles for just a few parts is awesome in my book! How could this be done?



    And no, I do not think I over tightened the valve the first time. I used the proper feeler gauges, so I am not sure what happened.



    When I say silky quiet... I mean compared to what it was! You have to realize, this thing ticked loud enough where it was much much louder than the motor sound coming from the exhaust. I wore ear plugs some of the time because it was so "raspy". It just sounded like an old engine , it wasn't like a knocking or anything. My motor always makes some racket so I thought it was just the same noise.

  8. #7
    Junior Member Ktroy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southwest Virginia
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by TW2007 View Post
    I miss the days when I was in the military and was able to use their shops or when I was in high school and college and had access to their machine shops. But alas no more…..


    That would be an amazing resource to have! It's hard for me to get into the repairs myself due to lack of tools and proper work environment. I cant even change the air filter without losing screws in the lawn. lol

  9. #8
    Junior Member ReddingRdr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    24
    Hi KT,

    Normally valve tip and adjuster failure is not due to a tight valve lash. When the lash becomes tight normally the damage is at the seats. Failures as pictured usually are the result of loose valves, excessive heat, contamiation, oil break down, other things, or some combination there of. Trying to repair the valve tip w/ files and such as to not remove the head would still require the removal of the spring and would result in a sloppy and short lived fix. Pretty much the same result w/ only the adjuster replacement, the tip would soon turn the new adjuster to trash and would add more contamiation to the oil. Unfortunately, pretty much the only way to fix this is w/ head and spring removal. That valve is not going to want to slide thru the guide. Do not force!!!! It will tear up the guide. Don't ask how I learned that. Once the head is on your bench w/ the springs removed you can now use your files, grinders etc. to remove all of the pooshed out metal as to allow the valve to slide thru the guidwe w/ ease. Take your time and wait until the valves is able to fall out.

    Once the head is disassembled, cleaned and a new valve is purchased a quick lapping in will tell if seat and valve grinding is necessary.

    Most of the work can be done w/ a basic mechanics knowlede. You may need some help w/ head disassembly and valve lapping. If you have anyone nearby that will offer aid w/ the sticky parts, this job should be fun and informative.

    Hope this helps Ron

  10. #9
    Junior Member ReddingRdr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    24
    KT

    Somehow I missed your last post. It would help if you had a friend's garage and tools for the job. Now before everyone jumps on me, I know that this work can be done in the dirt, but if you don't do this stuff regularly it's a bit less frustrating and bit more enjoyable in a garage w/ a bench. Ron

Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Similar Threads

  1. My attempt at valves.
    By gussy78 in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-14-2013, 12:10 PM
  2. Face wash happen to you ?
    By losttourist in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-26-2012, 01:58 PM
  3. did valves
    By jpuck in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-29-2012, 03:53 AM
  4. How often to check valves?
    By chisleu in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-12-2011, 06:26 PM
  5. Is it silly to check valves at only 400 miles?
    By RockyTFS in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-10-2011, 10:49 PM

Search tags for this page

ct70

,

ct90 noisy valves

,

ct90 valve job

,

do honda ct70 valves make noise

,

honda ct90 valve adjustment

,

lash adjuster ct110

,

my ct70 valves making noise

,

trail 90 valve adjustment

,

tw200 valve lap job

,

valve setting for 1970 honda trail 70

Click on a term to search for related topics.