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  1. #1
    Member jonah's Avatar
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    I want to make my dub like an enduro style and would like to get it as light as poss. Wondering if any one has tried this style. I've seen the off road, atv tire mod style, but that's too heavy for what I want. Maybe a off road/hollow mod. Any ideas?
    2005 TW200

    T-dub+rifle+predator calls=FUN!

  2. #2
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    This will give you some idea where most of the weight lies:



    https://tw200forum.com/index.php?/top...ponent-weights



    On a bike this size the first 10 or 12 pounds come easy. After that you gotta get pretty ruthless and/or creative or else start spending buckets of munny or giving up some functionality. You'll quickly reach the point where in order to save a pound you'll have to think of it as losing an ounce in 16 places.



    IMO airboxes exist for a reason, so get ruthless elsewhere. You'll thank me after yor first water crossing. Ditto for batteries. Smaller and lighter ones exist with eqivalent power to the stocker. Unless you go kick-only (don't rule it out) running anything with less actual capacity than stock is gunna make life miserable. Sawing off frame tabs is best left til the end of the lightening process. What appears dead weight at first often served a purpose that you find you can't live without by the end of the project.



    I've spent most of my life removing weight from bikes and have given considerable thought to doing exactly what you're planning. Certain things are kinda counterintuitive, such as the assumption that aluminum handlebars are lighter than steel, that disc brakes are lighter than drums or that aftermarket exhaust systems are necessarily lighter than the stocker. In most cases they aren't so if your ultimate consideration is weight reduction some of the stock items will actually be lighter than their aftermarket counterparts. Scales don't lie.



    Do all the free stuff first. Buying an 80 dollar set of handlebars which in reality only save an ounce puts that ounce in the realm of caviar and street drugs. When the time comes to spend munny consider a Clarke tank before investing in an exhaust system. The weight savings will likely be greater and at least the Clarke does something. No law says it has to be filled to the brim at all times.



    Free stuff involves simply removing things. Passenger pegs, helmet lock, kickstand switch, rear rack come to mind. The rear sub-subframe and fender extension could be done away with if you came up with a top mounted tail light and a means of attaching your plate. Our turn signals and mirrors are simply obese. Vent lines and overflows can be replace with clear vinyl or nearly weightless drip irrigation tubing, certain wiring and components can be eliminated. Yada, yada.



    The rear tire, wheel and swingarm assembly is the elephant in the room. Work around it. Think caviar and street drugs. It has 32 spokes.



    Bear in mind you'll probably be putting a lot of the weight right back on the bike in the form of heavy duty rubber, skidplates and a lot of the offroad realities like tools, so there would be no shame if the "all-up" weight of your lightened but fully armored and equipped bike came out at nearly the weight of a stocker.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member peruano's Avatar
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    If you are like most Americans, it would be far more practical and efficient for lightening the load pulled by the TW to lose 15 pounds by dieting for 1 month and enjoy the health benefits simulataneous with the increased TW performance. At least that would work for me. Tom 195 lbs, 6',
    Tom - TW200 2002, Kawasaki VN 500 2006

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  5. #4
    Senior Member n2o2diver's Avatar
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    I agree with Tom. I'm down 40 lbs since January. Might have been harder than just removing parts off the TW but I enjoy the weight savings all day every day, not just riding the bike.
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    2013 DR650

  6. #5
    Senior Member tw200sgp's Avatar
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    The problem for your idea is that the TW is almost entirely from low cost conventional metals and allows - steel and cast al but predominantly steel. Light weight bikes are made almost entirely from exotics such as magnesium alloys, Ti, carbon fibre and expensive high tensile steels. You'd have to replace almost everything including most of the motor cases. Take a look at a new KTM or Husqy - those are the ducks nuts as far as expensive alloy use.

  7. #6
    Member jonah's Avatar
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    6' 2" and 170 not much I can really lose there. I just got a lithium ion battery and wow it's small and light. Definitely the way to go for batteries. The lights are definitely on the list. Do they make an aluminum swing arm for it and would it be worth it. Also I was thinking possible trimming the seat down, more enduro style.
    2005 TW200

    T-dub+rifle+predator calls=FUN!

  8. #7
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Remember that your seat height is lower than a "real" dirtbike and the relationship between the pegs and the top of the seat is shorter as well. I'm a lot shorter than you are and I use every inch of that seat offroad.



    No aluminum swingarm exists, at least not in the U.S.A. The rear wheel is an oddball, not only by virtue of its tire size but it's 4.5" width and spoke count. Ditching it for aluminum would be a spendy custom proposition.



    Your project is worth doing, but will require a ton of thought and effort in order for you to be happy with the results.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  9. #8
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Drill a hole 1/3 the shank diameter from head to thread in every bolt or screw that does not also serve to stop leaking. Those bolts that serve as plugs can also be drilled, but stop short of breaking through the threaded end of the shank. Free, but time consuming.



    Many components can be riddles with lightening holes, but put some thought into strength before drilling.



    Switch to low-draw LED lighting and lightweight switchgear and build a new harness of reduced capacity to match. Lightweight racing handlebar controls are available.



    Carbon fiber rear brake rod.



    Use the original fender as a plug to make a mold to lay up your own carbon fiber replacement.



    Much hardware can be replaced by aluminum bits.



    How anal do you want to go with this project?




  10. #9
    Junior Member jefmtbkr's Avatar
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    I put on a fmf universal sparkarestor muffler and probably saved ten pounds from stock pipe.
    Never Let the Toubles of Life interfere with the Pleasures of Living!

  11. #10
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jef View Post
    I put on a fmf universal sparkarestor muffler and probably saved ten pounds from stock pipe.


    No, ya didn't. The stocker weighs 6 pounds. I think you'll find that yours weighs almost 5, with packing.



    The true weight of this stuff can be deceptive. A pound is significant, but if you're paying by the pound a Clarke makes a better burger than most exhaust systems and some things like aluminum bars leave you with a dry bun.



    All I'm sayin'.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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