fix flat during ride?
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  1. #1
    Senior Member evan's Avatar
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    I carry tiny air compressor (with slime) and some C02 cartrides for backup air but has anyone changed or patched a tire tube while riding? Been pondering on whether to carry extra tubes and tools. Local motorcycle shop said rear tube is quite big so that may not be practical or possible to change out on trail. Maybe just carry tools and tube for front and if rear gets big hole just limp home or back to truck?
    Mike Carter. Woodland, California (NorCal). '89 Tw200 (Black Widow Edition). Blood red Jimbo shield, Cycleracks, Nuvi 500 GPS, Kolpin fuel pack jr., D shield bark busters, 55t rear sprocket, Golden boy front tire, Ricochet shield.

  2. #2
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Slime sucks. Use RideOn instead. Go ahead and put it in the tires. Inspect regularly for stuff stuck in tires. On the other hand, the smallest and cheapest Slime air compressor is an awesome little tool for the price, size, and weight. Make sure the engine is running and held at a fast idle when operating--wouldn't hurt to pull the headlight plug to redirect current capacity (won't make any difference on an '86).



    RideOn can be cleaned off with plain water and a tube patched. Not so with Slime. I keep a new tube in the tow vehicle and patches in the tool kit. On unsupported rides far from home I do make room for a spare tube.



    I've replaced Tdub's rear tube and/or tire several times with only the tools in my customized tool kit, so, yes, a TW rear tire and tube can be dismounted and remounted anywhere. Your dealer's service department is pulling your gullible leg.



    Plan on 4-6 small CO2 cartridges to air up the rear tire sufficient for highway use. Easier on the battery than the Slime compressor. I carry both.




  3. #3
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by importmech View Post
    I carry tiny air compressor (with slime) and some C02 cartrides for backup air but has anyone changed or patched a tire tube while riding? Been pondering on whether to carry extra tubes and tools. Local motorcycle shop said rear tube is quite big so that may not be practical or possible to change out on trail. Maybe just carry tools and tube for front and if rear gets big hole just limp home or back to truck?


    I did a practice flat repair in my carport using only the tools I carry (2 tire irons). In my opinion, this is a job in which, practice would provide valuable insight. My bike was pretty new at the time so the bead was not stuck to the rim. On an older bike the bead and rim may have become the best of friends an to separate the two might be a real chore. If you find this the case in your driveway, you can clean and talc to ease trail side frustrations. I do have a spare rear tube but don't carry it, as it is pretty bulky. Gerry

    I dodged the bullet on this ride as the nail had not penetrated the tube...



    Did not see a need to completely remove the tire. With this, I would say my chances would still be real good at finding and patching the tube. If not, you can still pull the wheel from the bike.







    Take care my Friend.........

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    I carry some CO2 and a large hand pump. To inflate the rear by hand would likely require a half dozen energy bars and a couple of naps..... Gerry

    tools:



    pump:

    Take care my Friend.........

  6. #5
    Senior Member evan's Avatar
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    I agree on the slime not being great and only have it because it came with the tiny slime compressor. I have not put any in the tubes but figured for small leak probably better then nothing. So Qwerty your saying Rideon works good for tubes? The local motorcyle dealer said it was for tubeless tires. The local shop didn't say it was impossible to change out rear tube but said tube is quite big to carry around. I think I'll go with the Rideon in both tubes, carry front tube and patch kit. I really like the slime compressor. I've never had engine running when I'm using it but I have a '89 so can always kick start if needed. I would have engine running if airing up completely flat tire but have just been using it to air up from 13 to 30 psi.
    Mike Carter. Woodland, California (NorCal). '89 Tw200 (Black Widow Edition). Blood red Jimbo shield, Cycleracks, Nuvi 500 GPS, Kolpin fuel pack jr., D shield bark busters, 55t rear sprocket, Golden boy front tire, Ricochet shield.

  7. #6
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    I've often thought of adding Rideon, but I'm constantly airing up and down my tires depending on the terrain, and don't want to lose the Rideon when letting air out of the tire all the time. But this is for local riding. I think I would add Rideon for sure if on an adventure tour ride no doubt. I've also found using 3 tire irons instead of 2 is much easier for me. Just a thought.



    With a power outlet added to the TW, I bought a small air compressor from Harbor Freight, similar to what you mention. When using the compressor, I've done it with the TW idling as it only takes mine maybe 30 seconds to air up from 10-12psi back to pavement psi. Never run into problems thus far, but for every successful air compressor story, there is always one that doesn't.
    Hidden Content A ride in the woods helps me relax and release tension. The fact I'm dragging a body should be entirely irrelevant?

  8. #7
    Senior Member Bagger's Avatar
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    Glad to hear the endorsement for RideOn. I hate slime. I'm pretty lucky in that I hardly ever encounter any pavement so I don't have to worry about loosing the RideOn. (good point Ad)

    I have a small(ish) bag that goes along on whichever bike with a small compressor, patches, tire plugs and tire irons. Been thinking of adding this

    Bead Popper to my kit.

    Just had to change the rear tube on my TW and the HD tube folded up was about 4"thick and 8" long, pretty awkward to pack reasonably. I think except for dire situations, a patch kit would get you home.

    I use a large c-clamp in the shop that I modified to hold the rim on one side and fit under the bead on the other. Works slick, but far to big/heavy to pack along.



    Anyone have a better bead breaking trick? I tried the old "use the kickstand on the bead" trick, and either I'm too clumsy or I'm missing something. Even with the bike positioned above the rim, by the time I got the stand in position on the bead the bike was far too off balance and awkward to apply any real force.



    I'm thinking of adding 'breaking the bead loose' to my regular chain maintenance and tire inspection routine. At least that way it won't be stuck with ages of guck.



    Ideas?



    Bag
    "The TW may be slow, but the Earth is patient" - MK

    "If I'm wrong, and it turns out that you hate it, I'll send you all my Barry Manilow albums." LB

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  9. #8
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    I used a block of wood similar to the one pictured. It has a bit of a notch that allows me to lock it between the tire and the swing arm. With the rear held up with my crutch jack I rotated the wheel by hand and the block forced the bead inward and off the step of the rim . For me this turned out pretty straight forward, then again the bike was pretty new at the time. It seems the size and cut of the block matter as you want it to apply 'just the right amount' of force. To long and the block will never be able to be moved into 'good' position. To short, not much pressure will be applied. Old tire on an old rim, I have my doubts.. Gerry
    Take care my Friend.........

  10. #9
    Junior Member pushinluck's Avatar
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    +1 fo ride-on! I have pulled 2 nails out of my front tire and have only added air. When the hole is big the ride on shoots out at first like a water gun but slowes quickly. Freaked me out I thought I had a major problem with oil everywhere but no problem at all. I keep a 12in high pressure hand pump straped to the frame, works well for adding 15lbs or so but would break a sweat filling from 0psi

  11. #10
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Somebody needs to find a more knowledgeable dealer. RideOn makes a special version for motorcycles. It worjs well with tubes, and even better with tubeless.



    My first experience with RideOn was when I attended a dualsport ride of which RideOn was a sponsor. I yook advantage of the free product, as did about half of the other riders. At the Saturday night dinmer, the RideOn rep asked those who had suffered flats to stand. Six riders of about 125 stood. The RideOn rep asked those of the 6 who had RideOn to sit. One did, but explained he added the RideOn after the tire went flat, and had been riding on it 2 days since with no problems. The rep asked those with RideOn to inspect their tires the next day, and 7 later reported objects that resulted in a pfffft when removed. Moral of the story is that when using RideOn it is important to inspect tires often because objects left in the tire can continue to worsen damage, often to the point of ruining the tire.



    My 36,000 miles of experience with RideOn in new motorcycle tires is a smoother ride and ~1/3 more miles before wearing out, which more than covers the cost of the tire. I also run RideOn in all three of my cages, trailer, tractor, airplane (solved vibration problem), and bicycles. Even my grandson's trike has RideOn.



    Of the dozen or so times I've used Slime, the stuff only slowed the leak 2 or 3 times, and never stopped a leak.




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