Valuation / Pricing - 89 TW w 700 miles!!
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Thread: Valuation / Pricing - 89 TW w 700 miles!!

  1. #1
    Junior Member gutrons's Avatar
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    Question Valuation / Pricing - 89 TW w 700 miles!!

    Hi all,

    I own an '87 TW and LOVE it, awesome ride, (no need to explain to anyone here!) but here is my question...

    I stumbled across an '89 that has 700 original miles on it (not a typo...I was blown away). The bike is like brand new, totally immaculate, no leaks, just incredible. I wouldn't call it "museum quality" but the very minor scuffs and flaws are nothing worth whining about (to me anyways, bikes are for riding not for looking at). It looks like it was garaged, not sure about tire rot etc but the guy is looking to get $1,800 for it (uh....no. sorry...). For my money I think it's worth a few thousand miles to get a newer model with disk brakes etc...maybe I'm way wrong though? Any thoughts? Also if anyone can point me to a breakdown of what changes were made which years? I remember there was a split in 2001 but not sure what all that included. It would be a great resource for anyone looking to scavenge parts too, I'm sure the info is on here somewhere already, just haven't been able to locate it (yet!). Looking forward to replies!! Thanks!! BFG

    Runners:
    87 TW 200
    01 XR 100 (wife's)
    99 TTR 90 (stepson's)

    Projects:
    79 GT 80 (2 stroke)
    84 Goldwing 1100 Aspencade (barn find, soon to be a bobber/rat hog!!)
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Cornelis's Avatar
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    Newer model with disc brakes? no way for me bro!

    The older model TW's were built with much better built quality than the newer ones and they are also more powerful and responsive because of their slider carbs and type of CDI's that they have.

    On the other hand there is usual some small niggles to be sorted out with the older bikes, like cleaning and de-rusting the fuel tank and carburetor, maybe the CDI needs to be replaced and I'm 99% sure that you're going to have to replace those tires also.

    My advice is that if you don't mind wrenching then go for the older model, but if it is not your thing to trace down and fix problems then rather get yourself a new TW

    I found a list of just about all the differences between the various models over the years, thanks to the late lizrdbrth, one of the legendary members of this forum

    Quote Originally Posted by lizrdbrth View Post
    "All TW's are great bikes. Some (slightly} greater than others, depending on your point of view.

    '87's had one-year-only charging systems and ignition modules. Aside from that, they are essentaially no different from an '88-2000 model. They're becoming a parts problem with regard ONLY to the electrical systems.

    In 2001, Yamaha giveth us a front disc brake, (but taketh away our kickstarter) slightly more alternator output, a new CV carburetor, and a resetable trip meter.

    So basically the bike has had 3 versions of charging system, picked up a disc brake and lost its kickstarter in 30-odd years.

    All plastics are interchangeable from year one to present. Lots of lovely Barbie colors over the years if yer into that. lol

    The basic motor is the same and all parts will interchange except for the left side covers, which have slightly different castings to accomodate the different charging and CDI systems over the years. Later models had a self-adjusting cam chain adjuster. Intake manifolds, carb boots and cables are a bit different between the early and late carbs but late also fits old, and vice-vera.

    Quality control has worsened on the later model motors, so watch for base gasket leaks. Yamaha has issued a Bandaid in the form of an improved base gasket.

    All front end parts will swap between years. The disc front end differs from the drum only in the left lower legs and that the lower triple tree has a tapped hole for the brake hose mount.

    The late model carb drives from the right, early model's cables are on the left.

    Swingarms and rear wheels are all the same.

    Disc front wheels have thicker spokes and the spoke lengths and lacing pattern is different from a drum. Same spoke count. As far as I'm concerned both are equal in terms of actual braking distances. It's more a matter of "feel" than effectiveness. Pick yer poison here. Drums don't bother me at all. I own both.

    The rear brakes are all the same. They blow.

    Gas tanks are all the same except later models got a smaller gas cap and Cali models have a fitting for a vapor hose.

    Early models have better starter solenoids, relays, and electrical components overall, IMO.

    Later models have more output and slightly more sheltered and better protected wiring harnesses.

    Lower fork legs lost their drain screws at some point. Early models had them. Huge maintenence issue.

    Kickstands, frame gussets and welds are better on the older units. Whether this was neccessary or not is arguable, but they are different.

    While this is not a rant against Yamaha, be aware that numerous cost cutting measures like this have been initiated over the years. Most were also accompanied by some fairly significant improvement. Most are insignificant in the real world, but can complicate parts ordering and modifications. Recently some have discovered that the rear muffler mount location has been changed slightly, for example. So even though a 20 year old muffler is identical in every other respect it won't fit the latest and greatest. The good news is that the bike is rock simple to begin with.

    The only real interchangeability problems I've encountered have been between the electrical systems, wiring harnesses and switchgear. Lots of variations here, with minor, sniggling changes to the various connectors and components.

    Virtually ANY TW is better than NO TW, and no particular year is hands-down superior enough to another year to cause you to hold out. If it's a matter of cost vs. shine, a mid-90's unit in good condition would be my choice. "
    Last edited by Cornelis; 10-15-2017 at 05:42 AM.
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  3. #3
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    There are bits and pieces of information all over this board, but the question is better answered by year, not by make. Some of these bikes are from Europe, or Japan, and are not limited to the USA. They all have their little differences, some more important than others

    There are however, a few “major” changes to point out — the USA changed in 2000 and dropped the kickstart, but got the disc brake, and a more powerful magneto, and the CV carb

    The ’87 has a unique electrical system (and left hand crankcase)

    And in 2017, Yamaha changed the rear shock for one just as useless as the old one

    Other than that, there’s the off-set rear pegs, the filler cap, the magneto, the CDI’s, the left hand crankcases (again), the way the indicators cancel, the way the headlight works, the standard rear tire, the fork drain plugs, the fuses, the base gasket quality, the sprocket ratio, three types of headlight bulbs, and with the disc brake came the brake lever, the throttle tube, and sundry other mods to accommodate this.

    And that’s just on the USA models, and is by no means a definitive list

    The point being, that unless you have direct hands on knowledge of every year of production, it’s impossible for any one person to know all of this stuff, let alone go back and cross check it

    But if you ask a single direct question, one of us will have the bike in question, and be able to help you out

    As for the ’89 you’re looking at, prices vary from state to state, time of year etc, and condition is also a factor between a garage queen and something that’s been put away wet

    Low mileage is good — but many TW’s have low mileage, nature of the beast — just means it’s been sitting there for a while

    If you need a bargaining chip, then it probably has old tires, fork seals (30 years old), a gummed up carb from sitting — the list goes on.

    There are two different scenarios here, and if the bike runs fine, has new tires on it, and has absolutely no other problems, it’s worth what he’s asking all day long

    If it’s just been sitting in his garage for years (and with 700 miles on the clock it must have been sitting at some point), then two tires, a new battery, carb re-build, fork seals etc, so many unknowns — the cost quickly mounts up, and by the time you’ve got it “straight”, you could be looking at spending a grand on it

    So you start to see my point

    In answer to the question you have (neatly) not asked — very little from your ’87 will fit on a ’89 — just the frame and the tin, and this is largely down to the electrical system on the ’87, and forget about swapping engines

    If you could update your profile to reflect your location, you’ll get more answers on prices ……
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  5. #4
    Senior Member TopPredator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornelis View Post
    Newer model with disc brakes? no way for me bro!

    The older model TW's were built with much better built quality than the newer ones and they are also more powerful and responsive because of their slider carbs and type of CDI's that they have.

    On the other hand there is usual some small niggles to be sorted out with the older bikes, like cleaning and de-rusting the fuel tank and carburetor, maybe the CDI needs to be replaced and I'm 99% sure that you're going to have to replace those tires also.

    My advice is that if you don't mind wrenching then go for the older model, but if it is not your thing to trace down and fix problems then rather get yourself a new TW

    I found a list of just about all the differences between the various models over the years, thanks to the late lizrdbrth, one of the legendary members of this forum
    I second this...I own a 1988 and an 2006. Guess which one I prefer to ride. Answer: 1988 it is way more responsive and I like the drum break. It’s stops well and is Bullet Proof.

    $1800 May be on the high side but I bet he gets the asking price.
    Last edited by TopPredator; 10-15-2017 at 06:34 AM.
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  6. #5
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    I agree that $1800 is on the high side but 700 miles is way on the low side so it could be draw. What has and has not been done over the years will be the key to the actual value of such a bike. Leaving it sit around with crap fuel in the tank and carb is not a good thing by any stretch. Tires will most certainly be hard as rocks and the bike will likely need a complete going through such as in my sticky thread "How to bring back a sitting bike".

    I think if I was in the market for another TW I would go take a deep inspecting look at this bike and I would have $1500 in cash in one pocket with an additional $300 in another. Depending upon the true condition and what you see the bike will need you take it from there. If it fires right up and runs smooth and has a recent new battery and no rust inside the tank you may have found a winner even at the full price. Subtract from there with all the issues you do find. Tanks and carbs can be cleaned and tires will cost at least $150+. You will need a correct oil filter and 2 quarts of new oil, check the valve lash and air filter and the box where mice love to set up house right under the seat behind the battery. Lube the cables and chain and adjust it. Only by doing an up front and personal inspection can you ever determine the real condition if you know exactly what and where to look. Some years back I sold a 1991 with just 700 miles for $3,000 but it was pristine with new tires and tubes, new carb, new X ring chain and sprockets and had an oil cooler, rear Cycle rack with side bags holders, tachometer, ATV high bars and brush guards. That bike is pictured in the bikes by year thread.

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