Removing the spring from the shock
Close
    
    
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    500
    Hi again folks,



    Just wondering, can someone explain (or post better photos) of the best and safest way to separate the spring from the shock? I have seen the photos here:



    https://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/1144-rear-shock/











    So it looks like he has the shock in a vice, and then he is using the puller to compress the spring. So where do you go from there? You get the spring compressed a little, and then you can unbolt something and slowly release the spring off the shock? Is putting it back together just as simple?



    Thanks - Bart

  2. #2
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Desert, SoCal
    Posts
    7,369
    There's a fat wire clip that fits in one of three grooves on the shock body under the spring collar. You have to compress the spring to expose the clip, remove the clip then slowly release the spring.



    You'll want to make a rig similar to Gizmows in order to minimize the risk of it slipping. It's a fairly safe practice with the right stuff but if you mickeymouse it and the spring flies off while compressed it could do ya some dirt.



    I'm assuming you want to paint the spring. If you use automotive style spring compressors you'll probably rip the paint right back off of the spring when you reinstall it.



    Your local dirtbike shop may be able to pop it off in a few seconds if they do shock work. Might get the whole thing over pretty quick so you can just move on.



    Most Tw's are set on the middle clip position frm the factory. When you put it back together you should consider moving the clip to the highest setting when you reassemble the shock. That swingarm is awfully long and will place more leverage on the shock. There's a slight increase in preload available by moving the clip.



    Just as reference, my 2" stretch softened up the rear shock considerably. If it were any longer or if I were any heavier I'd be dealing with pretty serious bottoming offroad. In my case it tamed the shock perfectly.



    Just how much of a factor that will be on a street only bike I don't know. But I'm curious. Maybe the other hollow mod builders with longer swingarms will ring in.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

  3. #3
    Senior Member Rainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ephrata, WA
    Posts
    1,125
    I bought this and it worked great. I went to my local motorcycle shop and they couldn't do it. I then went to a few auto repair shops and they couldn't do it either. The auto repair shops had spring compressors but they were too big for the TW shock.



    I hated to buy a tool I was only going to use a few times, but it has come in very handy. Its small and comes in a nice metal case.
    If you can't find it, grind it

    1990 TW200

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Desert, SoCal
    Posts
    7,369
    Here'a a pic of the shock body showing the preload grooves and what the clip look like. Item labeled "1" covers them up when the spring is on the shock. Groove "2" is the stiffest setting, "3" is softest. Middle groove is where most are set from the factory:







    Rainman, is your compressor wide enough to go from collar to collar? If so I'm gunna look into one.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

  6. #5
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    500
    Thanks for the replies, guys. I gotta say, I read the reviews on that spring tools, sounds a bit dodgy. Maybe it is good for the TW spring though...



    Anyway, this forum rocks, thanks again for the help and advice.



    Bart

  7. #6
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Desert, SoCal
    Posts
    7,369
    It isn't dodgy with the right puller. Sorry to put the scare into you. You only have to compress it enough to reach the clips without scarring up the spring or gouging the shock body.



    Bike shops use a big press with a long handle on it. Takes about 5 seconds. One of our posters made a plywood-and-Allthread version of this, except he used thick plywood instead of aluminum for the plates. I don't recall who it was but maybe someone else does. The pics are on here somewhere. Probably only took a few minutes to make with a hole saw:



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDHIyCzahH8



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

  8. #7
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    500
    Yeah, I'm sure that puller would be fine for our springs. Maybe I will just order one up. I am kind of a glutton for tools, so adding a new tool to the box is always a pleasure!!



    Bart

  9. #8
    Senior Member Rainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ephrata, WA
    Posts
    1,125
    There are some awesome homemade spring compressors out there. If I had the materials on hand, I would have built my own. The one I bought was under thirty bucks and I thought that was a fair price. I was discouraged by the reviews too, but it worked great for me. I wouldn't use it on anything bigger.



    I went out just now and took the spring off my shock. Took me ten minutes.











    Using a 17mm socket, I tighten down the clamps, alternating between the two.





    Off comes one of the top holders (they just slide/swivel out)





    And then the other





    And lift off the spring









    Here is the spring still under tension off the shock. The spring really doesn't need to be compressed all that much to come off the shock.





    And ready to adjust the clip or just paint your spring.





    If you want to paint your spring, just release the pressure off the clamps, paint it, LET IT DRY, put the clamps back on, tighten down and put on the shock.
    If you can't find it, grind it

    1990 TW200

  10. #9
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    500
    OK, you sold me on it!!



    Bart

  11. #10
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Desert, SoCal
    Posts
    7,369
    Thanks for that, Rainman.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Removing rust?
    By drs6222 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 09-09-2012, 10:14 PM
  2. Removing sidestand spring
    By TWisty in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-17-2012, 12:23 PM
  3. removing the carb
    By zoolander in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-07-2012, 06:53 PM
  4. Rear shock spring removal tool
    By bruisr in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-26-2011, 07:02 AM
  5. Removing Monoshock spring?
    By retro in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-21-2010, 05:31 PM

Search tags for this page

new spring tw200

,
remove shock spring tw200
,
removing monoshock spring
,

shorter shock spring for tw200

,
spring compressor rainman
,
yamaha tw200 remove single back shock
Click on a term to search for related topics.