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  1. #1
    Senior Member kdick91's Avatar
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    Alright, so I have been a loooooong time lurker on this forum and posted once before about what to look for when buying a TW. Well, it's time for me to get serious. My fiance bought me the BRC class for getting my endorsement. She is taking it as well, I just have to convince her to get a TW as well! Haha, though she has never ridden a bike before, I hope this is good exposure! Now, down to business. I live in CO and I am getting a TW for several reasons. I want to trail ride. I want something fuel efficient. I want something cheap. In light of all those things, I am wondering what riding gear I should get. I want to buy one set of riding gear that will keep me safe when commuting to/from school but if generous off-road. I don't expect to be trying to trailblaze through the Tundra or anything, but something that can hold up to lashing branches, splashing waters, etc. Again, since I'm cheap, I'd like to have one set of riding gear that is suitable for both. If this is not possible, please say so, I'm open to correction I noticed you TW guys like 'TL;DRs', so here you go!



    TL;DR: What riding gear is suitable for both trail riding and commuting. Including, but not limited to, helmet, gloves, boots, jacket, pants, etc.



    Thanks so much! I'm *very* excited to join the TW community!



    Kyle
    Gone - 2006 TW200
    Gone - 2014 CB1100
    2015 WR250R - Bored, stroked
    Gone - 2000 Trans Am
    Stolen - 2007 Trailblazer SS
    2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT
    1977 Steyr-Puch Pinzgauer 710M

    2 Timothy 1:7

  2. #2
    Member Splinter's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard!!! It is a good thing the TW is an inexpensive hobby (when broken down into the individual mods). They will add up over time, but the bike will still be there ready for you many years from now. There are a few threads on here about riding gear. I would think the question you should ask yourself is "how important is your body to you?" When that is answered, then you can determine what is "cheap". It also does not mean that the more expensive something is the safer it will be. I would look up product reviews to get a list of stuff your interested in and then go try it on. Comfort is an important second to safe. Granted, this is all just a personal opinion. ATGATT

  3. #3
    Senior Member kdick91's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Splinter View Post
    Welcome aboard!!! It is a good thing the TW is an inexpensive hobby (when broken down into the individual mods). They will add up over time, but the bike will still be there ready for you many years from now. There are a few threads on here about riding gear. I would think the question you should ask yourself is "how important is your body to you?" When that is answered, then you can determine what is "cheap". It also does not mean that the more expensive something is the safer it will be. I would look up product reviews to get a list of stuff your interested in and then go try it on. Comfort is an important second to safe. Granted, this is all just a personal opinion. ATGATT


    Sorry, I should have clarified, safety is the BIGGEST priority! What I should have said is what is gear that behaves well when offroading and getting wet and is still comfortable for every day riding? The cheapness comes form only buying one set of gear! Haha! Also, another question, since we have snow and salt here, how do y'all keep rust off the hubs and other metal parts?
    Gone - 2006 TW200
    Gone - 2014 CB1100
    2015 WR250R - Bored, stroked
    Gone - 2000 Trans Am
    Stolen - 2007 Trailblazer SS
    2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT
    1977 Steyr-Puch Pinzgauer 710M

    2 Timothy 1:7

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  5. #4
    Senior Member RockyTFS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdick91 View Post
    Sorry, I should have clarified, safety is the BIGGEST priority! What I should have said is what is gear that behaves well when offroading and getting wet and is still comfortable for every day riding? The cheapness comes form only buying one set of gear! Haha! Also, another question, since we have snow and salt here, how do y'all keep rust off the hubs and other metal parts?


    I'm a big fan of Olympia Motosport gear, very versatile and not outrageously expensive. Check it out on Revzilla.com.



    Rust? Wash bike often with good (soft) water, using gentle spray and maybe an old paintbrush, ride it for 5 minutes to dry. Avoid spraying chain. Spray unpainted parts with WD40, especially before winter. (Don't get it on your brake pads!!!! )
    Rocky
    2018 TW200
    2014 BMW R1200GS LC

  6. #5
    Senior Member kdick91's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    I'm a big fan of Olympia Motosport gear, very versatile and not outrageously expensive. Check it out on Revzilla.com.



    Rust? Wash bike often with good (soft) water, using gentle spray and maybe an old paintbrush, ride it for 5 minutes to dry. Avoid spraying chain. Spray unpainted parts with WD40, especially before winter. (Don't get it on your brake pads!!!! )


    Awesome advice!! Thank you! Our water here is really hard I may have to go the car wash, they seem to do something to get softer water... How often do y'all respray the chain with lube? Good to do so after washing/riding? Is that the way to clean it?



    As far as spraying WD-40 on brake pads, my friend did that on his mini-bike to stop a squeal... He let me ride it immediately after without telling me how he fixed the squeal... I have a nice scar from laying it over and burning myself lol
    Gone - 2006 TW200
    Gone - 2014 CB1100
    2015 WR250R - Bored, stroked
    Gone - 2000 Trans Am
    Stolen - 2007 Trailblazer SS
    2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT
    1977 Steyr-Puch Pinzgauer 710M

    2 Timothy 1:7

  7. #6
    Senior Member assquatch20's Avatar
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    For the chain, there's all kinds of lubes, but a good chain brush helps. Some lubes are better if the bike has been run enough to get the chain warm first. Avoid pressure washers if you can. After each ride and wash is about right, and don't forget to check the slack in the chain each time and adjust it to spec.



    For gear, Olympia is great from what I hear. I wear Tourmaster textile stuff myself. Breathes decent in the summer, has a quilted liner for cold weather or a rain liner, and you can use both at the same time. Armor is good from what I can tell (haven't had to crash yet) and the price is nice.



    Helmets, boots and gloves are a little different than jackets and pants though. A street helmet typically doesn't have a visor. The helmets marketed as dual sport do, but it's largely unnecessary. They typically vent better, though. If you're really wanting a helmet that can do both, find one that will work with its faceshield or goggles, because that's the first drawback I notice using a street helmet in dusty stuff. There's only a few that do that. It's a largely personal affair for me, finding a helmet that meets needs. You'll have the option for communication devices, anti-fog, gogglability, visors, ventilation, the list goes on...



    Boots strong enough for offroading are clunky and uncomfortable in urban settings where you're walking much. However, there are boots you can get that will do a decent job at both roles. But realize you might need two pairs of boots.



    Same goes for gloves, albeit not as noticeably. Offroading gloves are going to be short cuff with serious knuckle protection. This means cold air is gonna creep in during cold riding. Street gloves can be short cuff or gauntlet style, but more emphasis on palm protection. Likely you'll want two or three pairs here as well.



    As mentioned, www.revzilla.com has great customer service, and please watch the "breakdown" videos to further your knowledge on the stuff that's out there. I gave a simple answer, but really there's a lot of gear that blurs the line.



    Welcome to the forum.

  8. #7
    Senior Member tw200sgp's Avatar
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    I like work type safety gear - steel cap boots, nomex overalls and safety glass / gloves from my offshore days. Cheaper than 'bike gear' and hard wearing.

  9. #8
    Senior Member RockyTFS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdick91 View Post
    Is that the way to clean it?


    NO! NEVER spray the chain with full force from a carwash wand!!!! That will destroy an O-ring chain in short order.



    If the wand has a little spray without pulling the trigger, you can use that, but even better, wait until home to do the chain as I said above.

    Even if you are careful, you will always get water on the chain, and if you are not going straight home to lube it at least ride at speed for 2 miles to spin off the water. The chain is the first thing to rust on any bike.



    I almost never use a carwash. What I did was have a plumber add a tap to my hot water line, which is softened. I just pull up to the garage, hook up a hose with a shut-off valve (not a nozzle) and direct a tiny jet of water at the dirty parts while using the aformentioned old paintbrush to loosen mud and dirt. I can keep the chain and other parts I don't want wet almost dry with this technique.



    I don't do mud, which is why I can get away with this rather fastidious technique. It did take me 30 years before I learned to take better care of my equipment....
    Rocky
    2018 TW200
    2014 BMW R1200GS LC

  10. #9
    Senior Member mrbracket's Avatar
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    Welcome, and do post pics when you get your Tdub!



    I use Alpinestar Scout boots for all but hardcore offroad, they are waterproof and comfortable enough to walk around in.



    I have Firstgear pants and jacket with D30 armor and they are also waterproof.



    I live in Oregon, I need waterproof.. LOL.. There are many brands of gear out there, all have their pluses and minuses.



    This place has great deals and information on riding gear: Atomic Moto The owner will answer any questions you might have, he's super nice and super knowledgeable.



    You've got a friend in the Bracket Business! Hidden Content

    Get your TW200 Parts at ProCycle! Hidden Content

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