Do you work on your TW? - Page 3
Close
    
    

Poll: Do you work on your TW? Do you enjoy it?

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 45
Like Tree120Likes

Thread: Do you work on your TW?

  1. #21
    Senior Member assquatch20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,273
    It's a love/hate relationship that gets better with more garage, more tools, and more beer.

  2. #22
    Junior Member Krakrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Laval, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Woman View Post
    Having my only bike apart gives me a little anxiety.
    Me too!

    But the TW is so simple to work on.

    Just to give you an example, this is what's involved in doing a valve adjustment on a KLR 650 (yes this is my KLR and I did it myself):

    IMG_20190401_202827.jpgIMG_20190401_202835.jpg

    On the TW so far I only installed wider footpegs and I changed the rear sprocket, but the TW is so simple that I wouldn't hesitate to dive into the engine.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    1,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Darth View Post
    I hear ya!
    Could you design a TW rear wheel that weighs less than a locomotive wheel? I'll be your first customer!
    Wouldn't an aluminum alloy rear hoop be just wonderful?
    While we're at it we'll throw in a disc brake. Have a removable aluminum rim like ATV trailer rims so you can more easily swap tires for seasons and terrain.
    I wonder if this would fit...https://recstuff.com/trailer-wheels/...trailer-wheel/

    I could design and 3d illustrate one with enough precision to be machined but fabricating one, that's way out of my tool and skill range. My lathe is only 7x12 with plastic gears. Good for aluminum but not at that scale. Best I could do is to make axle spacers.

    And since we're talking about aluminum why the hell couldn't they have made the swing arm out of it. That's a big chunk of steel. I guess a little weight keeps the wide tires from drifting.
    Last edited by Trail Woman; 05-28-2019 at 06:24 AM.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #24
    Senior Member Darth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Timbercreek Canyon, Texas
    Posts
    1,591
    TW:

    "And since we're talking about aluminum why the hell couldn't they have made the swing arm out of it. That's a big chunk of steel. I guess a little weight keeps the wide tires from drifting."

    Yeah...why wish for a loaf of bread when you can wish for the whole grocery store?
    Trail Woman and Purple like this.
    “It’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than a fast bike slow”.

    "The less horsepower a motorcycle has, the more it can teach you.” - Ben Bostrom

    And though a mountain may rise up and smack the livin' shit outta me,
    and wad up my bike somethin' awful...
    Still, I rise!
    (With apologies to Maya Angelou)

    Humans: simultaneously capable of such genius and such douchebaggery!

    "Give a Damn"
    - C. M. Howe, Jr.

    Hidden Content

  6. #25
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    1,305
    lol......so true. I tend to think big and then dial back to something more realistic.

    The aluminum rear wheel would be a great idea. Looking at aluminum rim prices it seems reasonable until you take into account volume and set up fees. You've got me hunting aluminum trailer rims now....
    Darth likes this.

  7. #26
    Senior Member tylermoney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Austin Tx
    Posts
    131
    I certainly fall under the category of enjoying riding more than fiddling on the bike, but I think that is primarily because I am not super confident in my experience/knowledge working on my bikes. It's been a long time, so I am definitely rusty on even what I know.

    With that said, I am trying to make it a point to do as much of my own work as I can. If I mess something up, I'll take it in. The Carbs are a bit of a pain in the ass, but I did have fun working on them this weekend (even though at one point I am fairly certain I put them back together incorrectly, as it wouldn't run properly)—I definitely gained some confidence with the carbs this weekend. Changing oil is super easy, so I don't imagine I'll ever pay anyone to do that. I will take the bike in for tires though. I don't think I'll ever have patience for that. Although I guess if I ever get a flat out on a trail I had better at least be able to do it. Ugh.

    I'll be attempting a valve adjustment here in the next few weeks. Tdubs Kid has a great video, and it looks pretty simple overall, so I should be able to manage it and save $$ from taking it in. I'd like to save $$ for buying parts and equipment for the bike and trips (as well as a future secondary bike).
    Darth likes this.
    2019 Yamaha TW200
    1973 Yamaha RD350

  8. #27
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    1,305
    Quote Originally Posted by tylermoney View Post
    I certainly fall under the category of enjoying riding more than fiddling on the bike, but I think that is primarily because I am not super confident in my experience/knowledge working on my bikes. It's been a long time, so I am definitely rusty on even what I know.

    With that said, I am trying to make it a point to do as much of my own work as I can. If I mess something up, I'll take it in. The Carbs are a bit of a pain in the ass, but I did have fun working on them this weekend (even though at one point I am fairly certain I put them back together incorrectly, as it wouldn't run properly)—I definitely gained some confidence with the carbs this weekend. Changing oil is super easy, so I don't imagine I'll ever pay anyone to do that. I will take the bike in for tires though. I don't think I'll ever have patience for that. Although I guess if I ever get a flat out on a trail I had better at least be able to do it. Ugh.

    I'll be attempting a valve adjustment here in the next few weeks. Tdubs Kid has a great video, and it looks pretty simple overall, so I should be able to manage it and save $$ from taking it in. I'd like to save $$ for buying parts and equipment for the bike and trips (as well as a future secondary bike).
    In 4 years off road on some sharp rocks I've yet to get a flat. Just avoid nails and you should be fine. IMO Roofing nails off the back of trucks are you're only threat really. Pinch flats really aren't possible with these big wheels. It is possible I guess for your tube to slide in the rim and t the valve get damaged.

    That's is a great tutorial, as long as you following the detail and triple check each step. I did mine last spring and so far so good....it's time for another round I think.
    tylermoney likes this.

  9. #28
    Senior Member Rider21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Reno, NV.
    Posts
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by Krakrak View Post
    Me too!

    But the TW is so simple to work on.

    Just to give you an example, this is what's involved in doing a valve adjustment on a KLR 650 (yes this is my KLR and I did it myself):

    IMG_20190401_202827.jpgIMG_20190401_202835.jpg

    On the TW so far I only installed wider footpegs and I changed the rear sprocket, but the TW is so simple that I wouldn't hesitate to dive into the engine.
    Hard to believe no one has marketed a tool to replace those shims without taking things all apart. I was using one on Yamaha's back in the 80's.
    Beauty is as beauty does.
    If it works good, it's beautiful.

  10. #29
    Senior Member Darth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Timbercreek Canyon, Texas
    Posts
    1,591
    Hey, Tylermoney...you're getting there, man!

    I see you live in Austin but you have "Tyler" in your handle.
    You don't happen to be from Tyler, TX do you?
    tylermoney likes this.
    “It’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than a fast bike slow”.

    "The less horsepower a motorcycle has, the more it can teach you.” - Ben Bostrom

    And though a mountain may rise up and smack the livin' shit outta me,
    and wad up my bike somethin' awful...
    Still, I rise!
    (With apologies to Maya Angelou)

    Humans: simultaneously capable of such genius and such douchebaggery!

    "Give a Damn"
    - C. M. Howe, Jr.

    Hidden Content

  11. #30
    Senior Member tylermoney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Austin Tx
    Posts
    131
    I am not from Tyler, but I have been there. It’s probably been 20yrs 😄

    Born and raised in Austin, with a 10yr detour in Pittsburgh PA.

    Quote Originally Posted by Darth View Post
    Hey, Tylermoney...you're getting there, man!

    I see you live in Austin but you have "Tyler" in your handle.
    You don't happen to be from Tyler, TX do you?
    2019 Yamaha TW200
    1973 Yamaha RD350

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. What do you do with your cool motorcycle stickers?
    By Ken in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-07-2018, 12:39 PM
  2. Work After Work
    By Lomax in forum Off-Topic
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 01-27-2017, 03:16 PM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 07-08-2016, 11:15 AM
  4. Had to take a day off work to go to work....
    By Flathats in forum Off-Topic
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-08-2016, 05:54 AM
  5. What do you use to support your TW for work?
    By Rohnsman in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 07-01-2014, 09:02 PM