Is the TW200 a good choice to learn on? - Page 3
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Thread: Is the TW200 a good choice to learn on?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Sthrnromr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoot Gibson View Post
    I wear size 11 GAERNE Oil Boots off and even some days on, the pavement, and the stock foot pegs have not been a problem either in Moab, or Big Bend, or the West Virginia Hills...but I'm a stock kind of guy, except for the front tire....The Rest, chain, battery, broken clutch and brake levers, etc, have all been changed out for other stock equipment...but Hell I'm an old creature of habit...with the Key Word being "OLD"
    Sure, and some people like stock gearing, tank, etc. I just found the stock pegs to be too small for my comfort when standing and hopping around in wet off-road terrain.
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  2. #22
    Senior Member tylermoney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoot Gibson View Post
    I wear size 11 GAERNE Oil Boots off and even some days on, the pavement, and the stock foot pegs have not been a problem either in Moab, or Big Bend, or the West Virginia Hills...but I'm a stock kind of guy, except for the front tire....The Rest, chain, battery, broken clutch and brake levers, etc, have all been changed out for other stock equipment...but Hell I'm an old creature of habit...with the Key Word being "OLD"
    I do recommend bigger foot pegs though... you can definitely manage with stock, but there are some on Amazon I got for less than $30 that are much better, and very easy to install. I'm a small guy and still felt the stock pegs were lacking... especially if you're going off-road at all.

    These are the ones that I got (via recommendation from TdubsKid on youtube): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    • I too recommend them, especially for the price—they've even prevented some damage from dropping the bike off-roading some.
    Hoot Gibson likes this.
    2019 Yamaha TW200
    1973 Yamaha RD350

  3. #23
    Senior Member Ski Pro 3's Avatar
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    I do not agree that the weight of the TW200 is a handicap. The largest bike I had ridden at the time was a two cylinder Yamaha 650 when I bought my Kawasaki 1200 Voyager, a full saddlebag/trunk touring motorcycle much like the Honda GoldWing. It is HUGE! By the time I took it around the block twice, I was convinced this was the easiest, best bike I had ever ridden. Once under way, they are totally graceful. The only handicap MIGHT be picking it up once dropped, but there are lots of videos showing how tiny little women pick up fully dressed harley hogs, so it's only an issue of training.

    I also would like to cover safety riding gear. Please make this the priority for your boys before placing them on a motorcycle. As the saying goes, dress for the wreck, not the ride. It's easy to make a quad go fast, anyone can, but to even get a motorcycle in motion takes skill and athletic ability. Meaning; there will be spills. It's impossible to over-dress for riding a motorcycle. At least heavy boots, MX style boots are better. Think about these as pre-casts on the lower leg, ankle, etc. If they do drop the bike, it's likely to hit the foot/lower leg and the heavier the boot, the better. A chest protector, gloves, helmet and eye protection are must-haves as well. From there, the sky's the limit.

    I also think leaving the bike stock for now is fine. Even that evil front tire. Your boys are learning to ride, not testing the limits of the TW200 at this time. There'll be plenty of time to upgrade components later. Let's just see if they even like riding two wheels first. After all, you never get your investment back on upgrades when it comes to reselling a motorcycle. And even if the boys do take a shining to riding two wheels, they may decide to go with another style of bike; one that performs better/faster/wider range than a TW200. About the worst thing someone can do with a TW200 is ride it in a style or conditions it's not meant for. This is a mule bike, not a speed bike. It's heavy, slow, poorly sprung and a blast to ride when on a sight seeing trip to Moab. It's very disappointing chasing your friends around through the woods at speed.
    Last edited by Ski Pro 3; 06-05-2019 at 10:52 AM.
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  5. #24
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ski Pro 3 View Post
    I do not agree that the weight of the TW200 is a handicap. The largest bike I had ridden at the time was a two cylinder Yamaha 650 when I bought my Kawasaki 1200 Voyager, a full saddlebag/trunk touring motorcycle much like the Honda GoldWing. It is HUGE! By the time I took it around the block twice, I was convinced this was the easiest, best bike I had ever ridden. Once under way, they are totally graceful. The only handicap MIGHT be picking it up once dropped, but there are lots of videos showing how tiny little women pick up fully dressed harley hogs, so it's only an issue of training.

    I also would like to cover safety riding gear. Please make this the priority for your boys before placing them on a motorcycle. As the saying goes, dress for the wreck, not the ride. It's easy to make a quad go fast, anyone can, but to even get a motorcycle in motion takes skill and athletic ability. Meaning; there will be spills. It's impossible to over-dress for riding a motorcycle. At least heavy boots, MX style boots are better. Think about these as pre-casts on the lower leg, ankle, etc. If they do drop the bike, it's likely to hit the foot/lower leg and the heavier the boot, the better. A chest protector, gloves, helmet and eye protection are must-haves as well. From there, the sky's the limit.
    I only brought up the weight as it may be a little heavy for a smaller 14 year old. Not that it's difficult to ride, but may be difficult to lift if dropped.
    Last edited by Trail Woman; 06-05-2019 at 11:13 AM.

  6. #25
    Senior Member tylermoney's Avatar
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    I guess I never really thought about the weight of this bike being an issue. It is lighter than my sv650 and my Ninja250 were by a significant amount ... my RD350 might be a little lighter, but is likely about the same. It's pretty easy to handle, and not too bad to pick up if you practice. With that said, picking up a dumped bike is good training anyways—especially if they're going to be riding off-road where you're bound to fall over.
    2019 Yamaha TW200
    1973 Yamaha RD350

  7. #26
    Junior Member BrotherJim's Avatar
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    I'm with TrailWoman on this one. My 11 yo nephew was excited to ride my TW for the first time, and was/is riding a TTR125. I'd call him an advanced rider for his age, and he did fine with it, but went over a steep decline into a creek crossing, maybe grabbed too much brake and went down in the creek with the bike pinning his leg. He could not move the bike to get out from under it. He was okay, but was done riding the TW. I was planning on having my 13 yo son ride my TW after selling his TTR125 this spring, and though he didn't say much about it, I could tell he was a little nervous with the idea. He's damn near adult sized and would probably been fine, but the last thing I want to do is have him be uncomfortable doing something that is supposed to be fun and maybe not want to do it anymore. I decided to buy him a TTR230, which has a taller seat height, but maybe 40 pounds or so lighter than the TW. He's stoked about it and so am I, 'cause now I've got another trail bike that I can ride! My $0.02, ymmv.

  8. #27
    Senior Member Ski Pro 3's Avatar
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    If you are looking for a light bike, go 2-stroke. Besides, they are much easier to work on and have a bunch more power than 4-strokes of same displacement.
    The bear slayer!

  9. #28
    Member Gorilla's Avatar
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    After your foot hits the ground at 50 MPH you learn to keep it on the foot peg. I have not ridden mine in quite a while. As an EMT I have been to alot of motorcycle wrecks. The last time I got on mine the clutch slipped out of my hand and I hit the ground HARD. As far as a learner bike: Heck yes! After riding a Goldwing my TW was fun to ride and not over powered.

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