Is the TW200 a good choice to learn on?
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Thread: Is the TW200 a good choice to learn on?

  1. #1
    Junior Member daved912's Avatar
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    Is the TW200 a good choice to learn on?

    Would a TW200 be a good bike to teach the kids on? I have two boys ages 16 and 14. I almost bought a 125cc china pit bike, but decided against it at the last minute. Reliability is the main reason. I don't mind wrenching, but prefer more riding than wrenching.

    A bit about myself. My first bike was an 80s KX80 when I was 16. Loved it and rode whenever time permitted. I didn't ride for a long time and got my motorcycle endorsement and a Ninja 650 to commute to work (in nice weather) about 3 years ago.

    We have a 2007 Yamaha Wolverine 350 (quad) - automatic CVT that the boys use on the local trails. I'd like them to learn (and they want to learn) a manual bike. My oldest has his permit and drives a manual car, so he has experience with a clutch and shifting. Riding conditions near me are wooded, flat twisty trails.

    Thanks for any advice,
    David
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Yes, I think it would make a good bike to learn responsible riding skills.
    The lower power-to-weight of the TW compared to a KX80 would have your boys focus more on developing bike control skills rather than twisting the throttle and seeing what happens. They would likely have more fun ripping things up on a motorcrosser but why not have them learn good primary skills first before turning them loose with big power?
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    GOF
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    Senior Member GOF's Avatar
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    Probably half a dozen people have learned to ride and gotten their endorsement on my '87. The TW is light enough and low enough that most can comfortably sit on them. It isn't over powered, is fairly simple to maintain, and is very user friendly. The one thing you may want to address before putting your kids on is the front tire.
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    Member Idon'thaveoneyet...'s Avatar
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    I learned to ride on a tw... last month! I'm 46 years old and had never ridden a motorcycle. So of course I bought a tw! My only complaint is the creaky clutch feel when releasing the lever into the friction zone. Granted I have <600 miles on it, but nothing I've read leads me to believe there is going to be any reliability issues.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Ski Pro 3's Avatar
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    I bought my TW200 from a Yamaha dealer that used them in a 'Learn-To-Ride' program!!
    So yea, I'd say they are a great bike for your purpose. Ask around and see if there's a program in your area. You may be able to pick up a good deal like I did; 400 miles and never out of 2nd gear most likely as the training is in a parking lot. The price was discounted to under $3,000.
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  7. #6
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    The Chinese bikes are good at what they do, but fall down on longevity. Three years and that’s about it. This is my opinion, and I’m sticking to it. We have a long time member on here, who (having done xx miles on his Chinese jobby), ended up sticking a TW200 engine in the thing. You get what you pay for

    The TW (in its original configuration), is easy to ride, and used by a number of learner programmes in the States. I’ve been riding bikes for nearly 50 years, and for a small displacement thumper, it’s about as good as it gets

    The TW is more of a “trail bike” than a “trial bike”, and as long as you embrace that, you’ll be fine. For your intended use, it’s a good introduction to the sport

    Welcome to the board ….
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  8. #7
    Junior Member daved912's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies. I've done quite a bit of reading on here and hand guards, bigger foot pegs, and front tire would be my first three additions/changes. Watching Craigslist, checking dealer inventory, and trying to figure out how to fit another bike in the garage

  9. #8
    Senior Member PlacerLode's Avatar
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    yes the perfect choice and most states MC training courses also use the TW
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  10. #9
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    Getting bigger foot pegs seems to be an “American” thing – if your foot size is less than a nine, play on – if your foot size is ten or above, you’ll need a folding shifter, bigger pegs, and (for some reason) an endless supply of left hand foot peg mounts (ask Fred)

    Quite why Fred seems to go through so many left handed foot pegs remains a mystery to many of us – but he does (consistently). We’ve often tried to video him on his “adventures” to determine why this happens, but he seems to just be a “blur” when we try

    The times when Fred has come back from an “easy ride”, having destroyed yet another (left hand) foot peg (and the occasional rack) are beyond counting – it seems to be a “tradition” with him – a “mark of passage” if you will

    On the bright side – if you ever need a “re-conditioned” left hand peg – just put a request in the “Classifieds” – I suspect “someone” has a bucket load ……
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  11. #10
    Senior Member Sthrnromr's Avatar
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    Is the TW200 a good choice to learn on?

    I don’t know, those anemic stock footpegs belong on a moped unless you are riding 100% street. Off-road I need real foot pegs especially when wet and muddy. Size 11 boot, just for reference.
    Offroad:
    TW200 - The Goat
    KTM 300 - Orange Dragon
    ATVs

    Onroad:
    Triumphs

    Way too many past bikes and builds to list. I won't bore you. Questions? Just ask.
    =)

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