2020 Yamaha TW200 - Just a left over 2019 or ??? - Page 4
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Thread: 2020 Yamaha TW200 - Just a left over 2019 or ???

  1. #31
    Member FIRE UP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TW-Brian View Post
    What, 3 years running with the same color scheme and not even any "Bold New Graphics" !?

    I doubt if the U.S. Market will ever see fuel injection on the TW. If U.S. emissions standards ever mandated it, my guess is that Yamaha will simply discontinue TW sales here as they done in other parts of the world. Much as I would like to see it, we should be careful what we ask for .

    Let's just be thankful that the "same old, same old" continues to be made available to us, at least for one more year .
    Well,
    To me, it's kind-a odd that, given the TW is still carbureted in the year 2019 and is a 200 CC "dual sport" model when, at least for '17 and on, (maybe even earlier, I've not looked), the Suzuki "VanVan" which, is almost an identical clone to the TW, has been fuel injected. And, even the Honda "Monkey" bike, which is a reminiscent replay of the Honda Z-50 of the '60s, is a 125 cc street-off road combo bike and, it's not only fuel injected but, is optioned with ABS as well. So, for whatever reason, Yamaha is either not needing to blend in with fuel emission requirements which means simply, If they don't have to blend in, they don't need to meander in the search and development department to create a fuel injected TW.

    https://powersports.honda.com/street...nkey?year=2019

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  2. #32
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    Take a look at the VanVan exhaust pipe – it’s huge – and that’s because it’s a Cat

    There’s a lot more going on with the VanVan than “just” the EFI

    But previous comments, Grewen’s in particular, highlight the disadvantages of EFI, and that if it isn’t set up correctly right out of the box, you’re in a world of pain trying to fix it. Any engine modification to that bike, electrical (CDI), exhaust system etc, and you’ll need to re-programme the thing using a laptop. Buy into the VanVan, and its best left well alone

    The TW on the other hand, is wide open to “tweaking”, that’s why we like it (whether or not we even need to do it is another matter)

    Imagine a board where every “My bike won’t start” thread begins with “You need a Laptop with the following software, please post your diagnostic results, so that we can tell you the location of your nearest dealership”

    Progress is often a dillusion, the VanVan being a case in point – the VanVan started out as a two stroke 125 with points and a condenser

    The TW’s strongest point, is that is hasn’t needed to change in 30 years, and that’s the dichotomy. How long can Yamaha keep that going – emissions over practicality – one defeating the other until the balance changes by legislation

    The colour scheme is the last of your worries …..
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  3. #33
    Senior Member Kev250R's Avatar
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    I don't mean to start an argument here but I own two fuel-injected bikes (KTM 990, Honda Grom) and several carb'd ATV's, a carb'd VW-powered Manx 'Buggy and a VW Thing with a modern(ish) fuel-injected engine in it. Personally I prefer to trouble shoot the EFI models I own as opposed to the carb'd models as there is something to be said for getting a CEL, pulling a code (most of the time on a bike it doesn't require a special tool or a laptop from what I've seen, although yes there are exceptions) googling what the code means, then looking in the direction which it points. Sure it's not a perfect science but I'm a fan. Case-in-point I recently spent a week riding with a friend who rides a modern WR250R which developed a hard-start condition on the first day of our week-long trip. Without using any special tools or a laptop my friend was able to pull the codes he was getting and test every sensor on the bike individually all from the stock gauge cluster. I was impressed and if Yamaha adopted that same system on a TW I'd buy one tonight!

    Kevin
    Ken likes this.
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  5. #34
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    You are not starting any argument here Kev and most of us would agree with one exception and it is a rather big exception. Basically you can buy a brand new TW for under $5,000 OTD with all the taxes, fees and title paid. How many thousands more is a WR250R that comes with all the benefits you rightly describe? Also something to be considered is how many WR250Rs will still be running 32 years from today like so many of our TWs are? My buddy and member here Bucknutz has a real sweet WR250R and it sure is a great bike however it is not without similar issues you describe and he has yet to figure out the on board gauge cluster that probably could get the bike right by throwing the codes and directing him to the fix. Some of us are what I call Analog men/woman living in a Digital world. For a good number of years I lived with a VCR in my living room that always showed the time on the display but it was only right twice each day 12:00. Yes, I could get the clock correctly reset but every time we had a power outage even for just a split second it went right back to 12:00 so I quit even bothering resetting the dumb thing.
    I sure do love those On Board clusters and in particular the ones that don't require a special Dealer owned code reader. Funny story here but it fits with this discussion. We have a real nice kitchen Frigidaire Gallery edition SS french door fridge that is only 5 years old and cost us $2500. We had some real nasty storms roll through a while back and the power kept going off and back on probably 6 times during these storms. In the morning all the food in the fridge was warm and I could not reset the temp at all. I called the service repair guy and he could not get here for at least a week because a lot of others were also having issues. We went out and bought another new and even fancier fridge for $3600 because we can't live for a week without one. The repair guy gets here as scheduled 6 days later and I had the nice broken fridge in the garage and all cleaned up and just needed to know how expensive it was going to be to repair it. He called in to the Tech line at Frigidaire and they walked him through the On Board cluster functions. It took him all of 10 minutes on the phone and pushing buttons as directed and the fridge came back to life. No parts, nothing broken or needing repair and just a simple reboot of the On Board computer. I paid the $100 service call fee and now we have 2 real nice fridges. What chaps my ass is that Frigidaire could have but refused to walk me through these simple steps and insisted that an Authorized Repair Tech had to service the unit. Evidently the power outages and subsequent surges knocked the computer settings off far enough that they had to be reset to the factory settings. Some of these On Board systems are "Proprietary" and can only be accessed by Authorized Factory service Techs. Between all the food lost, the repair fee and the cost of the new fridge I could have bought a new TW if I wanted one.

    GaryL
    Be Decisive! Right or Wrong just make a decision. ​ The road of life is paved with flat squirrels that couldn't make a decision.

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  6. #35
    Senior Member stagewex's Avatar
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    TW is a bread-&-butter bargain basement bike for Yamaha. Without almost any particular upgrades over the years it still sells strongly in all markets. Other than color schemes and a few tweaks over the years it is the forgotten step-child of Yamaha. They have no incentive to upgrade this model.

    If they do it will be another better model called something else or maybe a re-badged version/same name but very different. Perhaps the same fat tires.
    It sells the way it is, that's the point.

    That VanVan is still on the showroom floor, the TW is gone/sold.
    Purple and KLRCris like this.
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  7. #36
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    One major point that seems to be overlooked often with the TW and all the carb issues is the cause of all the strife. There is nothing at all wrong with the carbs and almost every issue we talk about so often here is a direct result of bad fuel or poor storage usually for long periods. All motors that use fuel and have metal fuel tanks connected to carerators suffer the same exact problems. Bad fuel can be described as either old and stale fuel left in the tanks that attract moisture from the atmosphere because the system is a vented one that has a direct link to outside air and the moisture or humidity in it. Bad fuel can also be described as fuels with ethanol in them which is in all essence alcohol which is a moisture attractant. E fuels tend to break down faster and more pronounced than non E fuels and it matters very little what preventative measure you take with additives. Rust forms inside the tank against the inside metal and the E fuels go through the process of Phase Separation where any moisture that gets in creates a condition for rust. The petcock has fine mesh screen filters to keep much of the tiny particles out of the carb plus the carb float valve has a fine mesh screen filter to aid in keeping the junk from entering the carb. You can also add an in-line fuel filter however none of these will keep the moisture from passing through and into the carb. Next is the fuel bowl at the bottom of the carb where this old, bad and stale fuel could sit for long periods. Again, the fuel system is vented to the outside atmosphere so any fuel left sitting in the float bowl can also attract moisture and turn stale and start the corrosion of parts.
    TWs that are used often or daily rarely ever have fuel/carb issues while those that sit for long periods with ageing gas do. It is my personal belief that a bike such as a Van Van with EFI rather than a carb will also suffer similar fuel issues if left the same as many TWs for long periods with ageing fuel in the tanks and fuel injection systems. Face a few facts guys and gals. How often do we see TWs that are 10 and more years old that have under 1,000 miles on them. Based on about 70 miles per gallon in these 1.8 gallon tanks that is less than a full tank of fuel every year and that my friends is old, stale fuel no matter what you do to it. In short, keep your fuel fresh and you should not experience many problems with your carbs.

    GaryL
    Purple, Dryden-Tdub and jbfla like this.
    Be Decisive! Right or Wrong just make a decision. ​ The road of life is paved with flat squirrels that couldn't make a decision.

    Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
    If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    1987 Yamaha BW350 Big Wheel
    2017 Snowdog Track sled tow motor for ice fishing
    Kubota BX2370 Subcompact tractor with snow blower
    Wilderness System Ride 115 fishing Kayaks

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