Considering 2nd bike...would love opinions of fellow TW Owners
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Thread: Considering 2nd bike...would love opinions of fellow TW Owners

  1. #1
    Member Aggie97's Avatar
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    Considering 2nd bike...would love opinions of fellow TW Owners

    I love my TW. I love it for what it is...a great off-road street legal trail bike.

    I'm considering eventually getting a 2nd bike. Mainly so I can teach my two boys to ride as they get older (I think the TW is perfect learning bike). So I don't know if I should get another TW, or get something I know will address the things that the TW lacks...higher speed for highway mainly (for when needed).

    Definitely want a dual-sport. Leaning Yamaha again but not ruling out Honda or Kawasaki, maybe even KTM.

    I wouldn't mind a little bigger (cc and seat height) but don't want to go too big. I'm 5'10", 170.

    Possibilities: WR250R, CRF250, KLX250, others...

    Thoughts?
    tylermoney likes this.
    2018 TW200 - 1500 miles on it

  2. #2
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Get a second TW.

    1) Your boys will feel less like second class citizens if they ride the same bike as their Dad is riding. Young adults appreciate being treated as young adults. They can more readily learn by mirroring your style and techniques better than if you were demonstrating atop a KTM 530EXC.

    2) When something goes wrong with one TW you have a second TW for comparison purposes as well as parts exchange for a diagnostic aid. This really comes in handy when trying to decide whether to buy a new carb, a new CDI, or stator source and pulse coils

    3) Get a third more powerful bike when the wife isn't looking.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
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  3. #3
    Member Aggie97's Avatar
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    All good points Fred.
    2018 TW200 - 1500 miles on it

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  5. #4
    Senior Member tylermoney's Avatar
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    If you're looking for a secondary bike that has a little more power/long-distance riding capabilities, I'd highly recommend a Suzuki SV650 or the Yamaha MT07. Both have great engines that are tried and true, are a great size/weight (not quite going to superbike or sport bike status), and both are reasonably affordable, and it's likely easy to find used ones. I rode a 2007 SV650 for almost 3yrs, and it was a great motorcycle.
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  6. #5
    Senior Member Badgerflorida's Avatar
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    Fred makes great points. Especially about having a second same bike to swap parts over to narrow in on what’s wrong. I woulda probably bought a lot of unnecessary parts just hoping throwing new parts at it would magically fix the problem.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member bartruff's Avatar
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    How old and how big are the boys.....the TW is pretty heavy for a 9-13 year old......I got them Honda XR 100s - 175s as they were not going to ride on open roads...…. when they got into their mid teens and were able to buy their own bikes they got high performance yappy two strokes ……. now that they are in their 40s they like the old mans bike ..the TW....

    I live very near a section of the Washington Backcountry Discovery Road that involves some highway riding and they are all riding various 650s Duel Sports..... same in Alaska..

    I love the Triumph Scrambler but I doubt it is much fun off roads...
    Last edited by bartruff; 09-17-2019 at 08:14 AM.
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  8. #7
    Senior Member RaZed1's Avatar
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    If you want a 250ish class dual sport, you can find KLX250's out there for fairly cheap, and they're my pick of the old school 250's. The Honda 250L is overweight and underpowered. People like to think the WR250 being that it's "based" on the 250F motocross motor would have a lot more punch, but the WR250F (the off road version) and the WR250R (the road legal dual sport) have virtually nothing in common. The R version is so choked up with emissions controls and de-tuning it has a fraction of the power it should (you can get it back, but figure quite a bit of $$$ you have to sink in) and they really don't run very well out of the box. The WR also reeks of cost-cutting, everything is right from the parts bin and to me feels overpriced for what you get. The KLX isn't as porky as the 250L, and the motor is more entertaining and has more of an aftermarket, and overall fit and finish feels better. The KLX only got fuel injection last year, so if you like the simplicity of a carb there's an ocean of used ones still out there sporting carbs. The 250L has always been EFI, and the WR250 has been for the last few years.

    When it comes to dual sports Euro bikes corner the market for a good reason. Find a used 350EXC. You can find clean low hours ones in the 4-5k range, it'll blow anything Japan makes out of the water. Also contrary to what most people think, KTM or Beta engines are extremely reliable. Buddy has over 500hrs on his 500EXC and it's been flawless. I have over 200hrs on my 2 stroke Beta Xtrainer (plated, so it's technically a dual sport). Both are on original engines and are nowhere near "worn out".
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  9. #8
    Junior Member Fzyace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie97 View Post
    I love my TW. I love it for what it is...a great off-road street legal trail bike.

    I'm considering eventually getting a 2nd bike. Mainly so I can teach my two boys to ride as they get older (I think the TW is perfect learning bike). So I don't know if I should get another TW, or get something I know will address the things that the TW lacks...higher speed for highway mainly (for when needed).

    Definitely want a dual-sport. Leaning Yamaha again but not ruling out Honda or Kawasaki, maybe even KTM.

    I wouldn't mind a little bigger (cc and seat height) but don't want to go too big. I'm 5'10", 170.

    Possibilities: WR250R, CRF250, KLX250, others...

    Thoughts?
    Consider a trials bike. Riding one will add to your low speed skill set and make you a better. safer rider all around.
    Willys714 and nobade like this.
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  10. #9
    Senior Member kj7687's Avatar
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    The real issue is not really KTM versus Japanese bikes. It has a lot more to do with how a given model was designed. Any very high performance model, whether European or Japanese, is going to be significantly less durable. Euro bikes are typically designed with considerably more power than "comparable" Japanese models, meaning that typically, the Euro models will have a greater propensity for problems and will be less durable. There is ample evidence for this assertion, if you really look for it; I have ridden thousands of hours on multiple different motorcycles, communicated with hundreds of people about their bikes, riding habits, problems with their bikes, general ownership experiences, etc., as well as having done hundreds of hours of research on this general topic. While there are MANY varied factors that contribute to reliability and long term durability, generally speaking, a motor of any given displacement is going to be more durable if it makes relatively low power (for that displacement) and less durable if it makes relatively high power. More power (and more power being APPLIED -- which depends on riding habits/riding style, displacement and total horsepower relative to the power typically needed and USED from a given motor) means increased wear on pistons/rings, bearings, etc. To illustrate, consider the typical, aggressively-ridden, modern motocross 250 with 40 horsepower that needs a top end every 40 hours. Compare that to, say, something like my 20 horsepower DR 200...half the horsepower, but I had over 900 hours on it when I sold it (on all original motor internals), and it still ran like an absolute sewing machine when I sold it, in spite of the fact that I rode that bike HARD (constant 7,000 RPM on the highway for hours at a time, regularly; regularly revving to 8k+ RPM and slipping the crap out of the clutch all the time at slow speeds in very high heat riding environments in highly technical and extremely challenging off road terrain). Due to the reasons stated above, it is absolutely true that the typical Japanese dual sport, on average, will require less frequent maintenance and be more durable than the typical European dual sport.
    Last edited by kj7687; 09-19-2019 at 03:10 PM.
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    Current rides:
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    Past rides: 2015 Yamaha XT 250, 1997 Suzuki DR 200, 2007 Honda Ruckus, 2007 Yamaha TW 200, 2007 Kawasaki Ninja 500, 2009 Kawasaki KLX331S; 1994 GMC Sierra 1500, 1987 Nissan Pathfinder, 1992 Acura Integra, 1986 Honda CRX, 1989 Jeep Cherokee, 1994 Chevrolet Astro Van, 1979 Volkswagen Rabbit, 1984 Jeep Cherokee

  11. #10
    Senior Member Xracer's Avatar
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    One of the best KTM dealers in East Tennessee told me the same thing and for the same reasons. If your willing to take good care of them then you will be happy. If you treat it like a Dub then not so much.
    kj7687 likes this.

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