Do any of you run your tires at high pressure
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  1. #1
    Senior Member silverhead's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure the street tire pressure on the TW is around 20 PSI in either tire based on their size and the weight of the bike.



    I like to run most of my stuff over-inflated because it just feels right. Quicker (some would say twitchier, less confidence inspiring) handling and all that. I'm running my TW at 32psi rear tire, 30psi front tire. I may lower it down now that I've changed out my steering bearings. When my bearings were indexed it was pretty much the only way to keep the bike from tracking left down the road.



    Anyway, my question is if there's ever been any proven evidence that grossly over-inflating the tires causes them to wear out faster? My hunch is no since I usually get more miles out of other bike tires I run high.



    I'm going to be lowering them down to about 15 PSI for gravel road testing. Riding the TW at 30 PSI on gravel is an exercise in balance.



    I was just thinking about it and I dug up some old threads that turned into arguments about danger and tire wear, but I didn't see any photographic proof that anyone died or tires were thread bare after 150 miles...
    1993 TW200

  2. #2
    Senior Member small's's Avatar
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    Why? I doubt it hurts anything but i dont see the point unless it just makes you happy. You can drag your feet in the corners with 20psi.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rm_hm's Avatar
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    I run 22 in my stock back tire and 30ish in my kenda front tire



    Partial reprint of one of my posts in the kenda tire thread



    To do it’s job, a tire needs to be inflated to the correct air pressure. If the pressure is too high, the tire will be too stiff, the ride will be harsh, the contact patch will be reduced in size, traction will be reduced, and wear at the center of the tread will be accelerated. If the pressure is too low, the tire will flex excessively, steering will be "mushy", the shoulders of the tread will wear prematurely, and the rim can be damaged by impacts . Note that a flexing tire carcass generates heat. A tire that’s under-inflated by just 10 psi can cause permanent internal tire damage, especially if the bike is overloaded, or speeds are aggressive. Once the damage has been done, the tire is an accident waiting to happen. It may not fail today or this week, but we shouldn’t be surprised if it suddenly comes apart a few thousand miles down the road.



    But let’s note that the pressures recommended by the bike engineers are for the stock tires that came with the bike. If you change to different tires, then it’s time to consult the tire manufacturer.



    18-22 is yamaha's recommended pressure for the stock tire. My kenda is stamped for 40psi max . Steering was scary as hell at 20psi on pavement for me with this tire. It was also harder to turn.



    Several folks over at adv settled in between 20ish for dirt only and 30ish for mostly pavement and made the statement "You might want to run a bit more psi than usual. The 270 is a fine tire, but pretty weak side wall and overall construction. A heavy rider or bike riden aggressively on rocks will produce flats and/or a badly damaged tire if the psi is down in the 20-24 range



    Review from http://www.ridermaga....cfm?id=2129635



    Upon arriving at the fire road in Los Padres National Forest, I reduced the tire pressure to 25 psi. Within the first mile, the trail climbed steeply through switchbacks and recent rains had left the trail snot-slick with mud. The K270 knobbies dug in capably and carried me to our first checkpoint, with the knobbies easily shedding mud along the way. Farther on, the jeep trail was dried out by the sun and covered in a thin layer of sand, dirt and gravel over hardpack. Acceleration, braking, cornering, slides—all were done with confidence. When I rode the same fire road a week later with the tire pressure at 19 psi, the tires felt too loose and had less impact resistance.





    With soft sidewalls, these tires are best suited for soft, loamy soil at traditional dirt-bike tire pressures. Keep the tires pumped up for hard surfaces, especially on the street, or else you’ll slide around too much and possibly damage your bike’s rims.


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  5. #4
    Senior Member silverhead's Avatar
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    I've got em at 22psi back, 20psi front right now and she rides just dandy on the pavement. Noticeably softer over bumps as well. I'll give this a week to see if I prefer it.



    Handling is still just fine. Hard braking is improved as well.
    1993 TW200

  6. #5
    Senior Member evan's Avatar
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    When I had both tires stock I liked 30 psi front and back. less tire noise and handled fine. on the trail I would drop them both to 15 psi. put the goldenboy on front and at 30 psi way too much vibration! hard to see that cop behind you.....Next street ride I'm going to drop them both to 25 psi and see if that gets rid of mirror vibration. on the sheetiron 150 we were on dirt and pavement so ran both at 18 and it worked well.
    Mike Carter. Woodland, California (NorCal). '89 Tw200 (Black Widow Edition). Blood red Jimbo shield, Cycleracks, Nuvi 500 GPS, Kolpin fuel pack jr., D shield bark busters, 55t rear sprocket, Golden boy front tire, Ricochet shield.

  7. #6
    Senior Member small's's Avatar
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    I usually run 18-20psi front and back. When we where in Moab i ran 15 all the time. Still handled very good on the pavement. Alot of guys run 7-12 up front with non stock tires for off road riding. That was the about the rockiest terrain ive ever ridden besides maybe Colorado. I dont agree with the less than 25psi will damage the tire off road or on road on a TW anyway. We rode over 1600 miles of pavement at 60+mph alot of the time with 20psi.

  8. #7
    Senior Member frog13's Avatar
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    I understand what Silverhead is figuring...I think.The side wall on the OEM tires is stamped in the 30's psi wise (bike is not near-by for me to look for absolute numbers?).As the riders advised in the previous responses.....air down for off road.....air up for on road.I don't take to much stock in the manual's psi rating...generally.My 07 XR650L had a psi in the manual advising of mid-upper- 20's...if I remember correctly.When the bike received it's 600 mile checkup,the tech. advised of super low psi in the tires!....I told him I went by what the manual recommended.So, after that I started running low 30's...all was well.Rich has good points on this.If you use close to or at the MAX rated air pressure,and the bike is NOT loaded to it's rated max capacity,you will wear the middle tread out prematurely. Good luck.

  9. #8
    Senior Member r80rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Small's View Post
    I usually run 18-20psi front and back. When we where in Moab i ran 15 all the time. Still handled very good on the pavement. Alot of guys run 7-12 up front with non stock tires for off road riding. That was the about the rockiest terrain ive ever ridden besides maybe Colorado. I dont agree with the less than 25psi will damage the tire off road or on road on a TW anyway. We rode over 1600 miles of pavement at 60+mph alot of the time with 20psi.
    I run 20psi front and rear, where ever I go.
    Only a fool would attempt it, and God help me, I am that fool!

  10. #9
    Senior Member 671tdub's Avatar
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    full pressure feels dangerous. i run em lower then spec. feels safer.
    2006 tw200

  11. #10
    Senior Member silverhead's Avatar
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    I'm liking the 20 psi mostly in the butt pain arena...



    I don't notice the danger factor on pavement. Definitely off road or on gravel roads though.
    1993 TW200

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