Navigation, gps, maps, google earth
Close
    
    
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
Like Tree18Likes

Thread: Navigation, gps, maps, google earth

  1. #1
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Turtle Wrangling the Sierras
    Posts
    18,808

    Navigation, gps, maps, google earth

    How thoroughly do you folks plan and maintain navigation on your adventures? Often we do not have cell coverage for real time mapping, however maps can be preloaded for cells. Usually I carry but do not rely on cell. What do you folks like?

    For a new area I personally try to assemble whatever maps I have and review them in advance making 8x11 2 color copies of Forest Service / USGS,TOPO, highway,whatever maps of intended route , one for wife at home for emergencies and one stored ahead of speedo and behind number plate. I'm an old guy, like paper. Seems to stay put and is readily available.Usually carry mapping gps too but screen is too small to make it my go-to navigation reference, rely more on memory refreshed by glances at map occasionally.
    .
    My best tool seems to be Google Earth viewed from home, can zoom from big picture to fine detail and give me a better interpretation of what I see on the maps laid out before me that I shall also carry. Overkill? Sure. Redundant? OK. Anal? Perhaps. Just don't like getting lost while exploring. And after all being able to complete a new loop is more rewarding than back-tracking . With an image of possible alternate routes and lay of the land in my mind I can better adapt to surprises. Who hasn't encountered a road/trail closure we thought we needed to get home? Swollen river, deep snow, road closure,accident, pic your poison detours happen and this is when best laid plans can go astray. And gas tanks go empty...

    Besides scouting GoogleEarth has revealed some neat destinations and routes to get there not printed on common maps nor identified by any signs on ground. State maps tend to not show alot of available secondary and primitive roads perfect for us but a little risky for average 95th percentile driver.

    Thoughts? Wisdom of the ages? Emerging technologies (Spot)? Family Radio, Helmet to helmet coms for groups? All thoughts appreciated. Boy Scouts wanted me to be preparred.
    admiral and CJ7_TW like this.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mattmus4357's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    250
    I usually comb through Google maps and lay out the route on there. After I figure out exactly where I want to go and how I want to get there I plan the same route in Garmin Basecamp, and from there it gets loaded on the Garmin 78. I can email it to myself and use it on the phone for a backup as well. Only maps I carry with me are Butler maps, but that's mainly just to scout good paved riding in unknown places. Of course I'm fairly young at 24, so I've grown up relying on technology
    Fred likes this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member jb882's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    A mere 36 miles north of Rhodetrip
    Posts
    1,377
    On the road i use my iphone on both my TW and my Ducati. I have a waterproof mount on both bikes that allows me to see it and its also hooked up for charging. I have a comm system in my helmet so i can also ear the turn by turn. I have the Tom Tom app that i use instead of the included app. It does not rely on any cell service as all the maps are loaded on the device. This setup has worked very well for me on the road. The key is having the phone plugged in so im not limited by battery.

    I have not used the comm system in my helmet off roar but i do have a couple road riding buddies that have the same or a compatible system and its fantastic on the road. My girlfriend has it in her helmet too and its really nice when we are two up on my Ducati.

    Off road i have another app i use called Gaia GPS. It has a ton of features for hiking and preloaded trail maps for all kinds of places. I generally done use it in that way tho. What i do is set a waypoint for where i begin my adventure and i also have it create a route as i travel so i have a breadcrumb trail of waypoints to get back to where i started. I generally dirt ride close to home and the vast majority of the places are places i know pretty well. On places that i'm not familiar with this app has worked very well for me. This is another app that does not require any data service to work. I have thought about a hand held outdoor GPS as well on the TW, i figure a ram mount on the bars would work pretty good. I have an old Garmin GPSIII+ that could work but its so old it might be time for a new one.
    Last edited by jb882; 02-04-2014 at 09:00 PM.
    Fred likes this.
    Pair of 2006 TW's modded to the hilt and a Ducati Multistrada.

    Hidden Content

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member small's's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Martinsville Indiana
    Posts
    2,089
    I use a cycoactive barpack mapcase and I use the satelite map on my phone to make a map and some directions. If its a long ride I usually make a few maps just incase my phone quits working. That being said I will be using locus or dualsportmaps if it comes back up this year. Its nice to be able to download sections of map so you always have them whether you have cell coverage or not it doesnt matter.
    Fred likes this.

  6. #5
    Senior Member naluboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    North County San Diego
    Posts
    278
    Thanks for the Butler maps tip mattmus

  7. #6
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Turtle Wrangling the Sierras
    Posts
    18,808
    This old dog may have learned some new tricks tonight,thanks.

  8. #7
    Senior Member trailscout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yarnell, AZ
    Posts
    602
    I use a micro sd card from HuntingGpS Maps in my GPS that shows property ownership, (private, state, BLM, NFS, reservation). I like to know whose land I'm on. It also shows lots of trails that are not on Garmins Mapsource software which I use. But Mapsource has a few that are not on HuntingMaps so I switch.

    I also use DeLorme USA Topo for looking at the terrain sometimes.

    And I spend a lot of time on Google Earth. I find a lot of trails on GE, create tracks, save, download, convert, and then download to my hand held. Then go find them on the ground.

    The stuff that is available now makes it so easy.

    In the past I used to scan maps into overlapping 8.5x11's, reassemble with Panavue, import into OziExplorer, digitize and calibrate, then make tracks to download into the hand held unit. Very laborious and time consuming. Now it's all done for me.

    Then the great thing is to download where you've been to view on various mapping software on the computer plus seeing where I've been on GE.

    So much fun. So little time.

    Edit: I also sometimes print an 8.5x11 of the area and tracs I plan to ride. It helps sometimes getting myself oriented to where I am on the trail because of the small screen on the GPS. I can of course zoom out but so much detail is lost that the printed out picture really helps sometimes in a new area.
    Last edited by trailscout; 02-05-2014 at 06:01 AM.
    admiral and Fred like this.
    Ya gotta finish the loop, it's your only way out!

    Hidden Content

  9. #8
    Senior Member Leben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    264
    I often plan my trips in winter, and Iowa has long winters. Because of having time to plan, I often have a pretty good idea what route I will take. I frequently use Google Earth so I can get a feel for the terrain and distance. I have recently started using a GPS charged by apowered mount on my handlebars. I don't use the GPS to its fullest since I am not the best with technology. With my wife's help though I am able to get a route installed ahead of time.

    As much as I like my GPS, I will never go on a big solo trip without paper maps and a compass. I am a big fan of the detailed DeLorme state maps that show pretty much every road.

    I have an OsmAnd GPS app on my phone that I can download maps to. With the downloaded maps I do not need cell service to know where I am at. I don't use this much since I use the GPS on my bike but I believe in being prepared and having options.

    Because I have a family and mainly travel solo in areas without cell service, I purchased a Spot tracker. The Spot is mainly to give my wife some peace of mind for the times I cannot reach her by phone. I haven't used it yet but I like the idea of pushing a button to let her know I am ok. The SOS feature is a plus in case I get stranded or get in an accident in remote areas.
    Fred likes this.

  10. #9
    Junior Member fairwindracing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    marblehead ma
    Posts
    22
    fred, I like the way you plan, that's what I try to do, but I aways start but never finish my map/to gps over lays. it seens some of the best days in the woods with the bike or buggy are with no plan or direction (lost)
    but now with two small girls at home I cant stay out till dawn so I just got a trail tech voyager for the tw. it looks cool but I will let you all know how it works this spring!
    if anyone use used a voyager let me know what you think
    Fred likes this.

  11. #10
    Senior Member CJ7_TW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Naples, FL
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by trailscout View Post
    The stuff that is available now makes it so easy.
    I like easy too, I just hope that I don't get too lazy in the process. There is history showing us that yes, we have lost some things along the way. Those crystal skulls we can't figure out how they were made (no machining marks), the pyramids too(sheer size of the stones), or the ruins of Tiahuanaco (exacting cuts of block and size of the stones too).

    Using stars for night navigation and quad maps with a compass is pure and art at the same time. I won't be carrying a sextant anytime soon but I'd love to know how.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leben View Post
    I frequently use Google Earth so I can get a feel for the terrain and distance.

    As much as I like my GPS, I will never go on a big solo trip without paper maps and a compass.

    Because I have a family and mainly travel solo in areas without cell service, I purchased a Spot tracker. The Spot is mainly to give my wife some peace of mind for the times I cannot reach her by phone. I haven't used it yet but I like the idea of pushing a button to let her know I am ok. The SOS feature is a plus in case I get stranded or get in an accident in remote areas.
    Yep, Google earth is an awesome "scouting" tool. I sometimes throw caution to the wind taking solo trips (by not mapping anything out or taking a gps), for sake of "adventure". I'd never thought of a spot type "tracker" but since you've mentioned one, it'll have to be on my "wish-list" so the wife can have peace-of-mind when I'm out and about.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. link from google earth photos
    By peruano in forum Test Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-16-2014, 12:01 PM
  2. Dual Sport Maps
    By TWiumph in forum Trails, Off-road, and Adventure Riding
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-14-2012, 07:18 AM
  3. google earth,
    By phazer in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 08-09-2011, 07:40 PM
  4. Packable Maps
    By surly357 in forum Trails, Off-road, and Adventure Riding
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-03-2011, 12:43 PM
  5. Link to Maps For Pacific Northwest Motorcycle Rides
    By TW2007 in forum Trails, Off-road, and Adventure Riding
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-14-2010, 11:57 PM

Search tags for this page

gps google earth map

,

using google earth maps to navagate

Click on a term to search for related topics.