Getting my TW200 ready for Moab
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Thread: Getting my TW200 ready for Moab

  1. #1
    Senior Member simbaboy's Avatar
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    Getting my TW200 ready for Moab

    Hello Friends,

    I got a 2007 TW200 last year for my wife and she loves it. It already has a few mods (larger tank, a rear rack, jumbo shield, ATV rear tire), but I would like to use it on some slick rock trails out there (Fins N Things, Slickrock, Hell's Revenge). So I started getting it ready.

    The shifter was a little bent so I put in a new from IMS. It works great. It already has a Protaper handle bars. On smooth roads it runs great.

    But here in Michigan we have a ton of pot holes. Even the most little bumps make my teeth chatter. The suspension is the only weakness I have seen on the bike. My wife has no complaints, but I am a big guy at @235#. I also ride a little fast on unpaved roads at about 45-50 MPH so I feel every little bump.
    1. Is changing the front fork oil easy and advisable or will I mess something else up?
    2. What is the heaviest weight fork oil you would put on?
    3. I will tackle the rear with a heavier duty rear spring when I come back.

    TIA,
    Simba

  2. #2
    Senior Member simbaboy's Avatar
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    I think adding a spacer may be the easiest and quickest way to go. I have done this to my KLR650 so I think I can do it.
    Are these the steps?
    1. Raise front end.
    2. Remove fork cap on one side. Add appropriate size spacer--PVC pipe or metal washers. Tighten cap. Repeat on the other side.
    Thanks. I have done some search and I think this will be easiest and quickest. I might even add 10CC fork oil to each side when adding the spacer. Any suggestion on a starting spacer length? would 1" be too much preload?
    Thanks
    Simba

  3. #3
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    The most common size I remember folks using as spacers is 3/4", not that 1" wouldn't work, just what most use I believe. To get the cap off, you may have to loosen the upper clamp bolts.

    I've read some owners have just added oil and got a little more stiffness without adding a spacer.

    Here is a good thread on oil levels and such: https://tw200forum.com/forum/technica...oil-level.html
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    Senior Member jb882's Avatar
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    Getting my TW200 ready for Moab

    The fork oil is an easy change , there are some great how to's on how to to it. If you are going to pop it apart change the dust and oil seals too, not hard to do. I'll post a pic of my damping rod tool I made later if you want. As far as oil I'd say 10# would be right. I out amsoil #10 in mine and it's much better.

    Lizbrth put together a great writeup on oil levels and preload. Following his advice I adjusted mine to 125mm and made some spacers for preload and it transformed the front end. It's so much better now that it was stock, I'm similar weight to you and I tend to ride pretty aggressively so I think I really still need heavier springs but the combo of fresh oil at a better height and adjusting the rear to the highest preload clip has made it tolerable for now. I did the same on my girlfriends and set it up for her.


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    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Drill and tap the caps for Schraders and put a little air pressure in the tubes. Works for me.




  7. #6
    Senior Member simbaboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by admiral View Post
    The most common size I remember folks using as spacers is 3/4", not that 1" wouldn't work, just what most use I believe. To get the cap off, you may have to loosen the upper clamp bolts.

    I've read some owners have just added oil and got a little more stiffness without adding a spacer.

    Here is a good thread on oil levels and such: https://tw200forum.com/forum/technica...oil-level.html
    Quote Originally Posted by jb882 View Post
    The fork oil is an easy change , there are some great how to's on how to to it. If you are going to pop it apart change the dust and oil seals too, not hard to do. I'll post a pic of my damping rod tool I made later if you want. As far as oil I'd say 10# would be right. I out amsoil #10 in mine and it's much better.

    Lizbrth put together a great writeup on oil levels and preload. Following his advice I adjusted mine to 125mm and made some spacers for preload and it transformed the front end. It's so much better now that it was stock, I'm similar weight to you and I tend to ride pretty aggressively so I think I really still need heavier springs but the combo of fresh oil at a better height and adjusting the rear to the highest preload clip has made it tolerable for now. I did the same on my girlfriends and set it up for her.


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    thanks Friends. Is the rear shock's preload adjustable? Maybe, for the rear that might be all I need for now and a stiffer spring in the future.
    I will add a little preload spacer (075"-1.0") and add a little fork oil (maybe 10-15cc) and see if that is enough to smooth out the little bumps on the road. I am not looking to do major whoops with this bike.

    I added a rear Duratool Box and on top of that I will add a Kolpin 1.5G fuel pack. Between that and the large main tank I should have a range of over 200Miles.

    Thanks,
    Simba


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    Super Moderator littletommy's Avatar
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    On the rear, I moved the circlip to the highest one. It is usually in the middle grove. Also added a 1/4 inch spacer, the bike sit's a bit higher, but sure is nice. I probably didn't even have to add the 1/4 inch spacer. On the front, I removed the stock 7 1/2 inch spacers and added 8 1/4 piece's of 3/4 pvc pipe. These two adjustments made it a whole different bike. It actually feels like a real bike, ha ha. I am very happy with these two adjustments and I am probably one of the biggest riders here on the forum.
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    Senior Member small's's Avatar
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    The 5.10 front tire floats alot in the sand and makes it feel awkward. The skinning front is better in the sand but either way it will make It fine.

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    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Slick rock is good traction. It was slick to wagons with steel bands for tires, but rubber tires stick lick glue. Stock front tire sucks in deep, soft sand. TW does not have enough power to keep up enough speed to keep a skinny tire atop the sand, so a skinny tire may be better than the stock tire, but the best solution is a better front tire in the stock size. It is much easier to keep enough speed to stay atop the sand with a wider tire, but it helps to have a more open center tread with closely spaced knobs on the outside. The Trak Master K760 works well, as does a Dunlop D606. Expect either tire to wander in a straight line, but don't fight, just let it wander. Bank over in a corner and either will feel like it's on rails. You will also have the only bike with front brakes that work on sand since such tires are primarily designed for straight line traction so don't grab a handful of brakes when someone is following closely. You have been warned.




  11. #10
    Senior Member simbaboy's Avatar
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    Thanks Friends.
    Its good to know that the rear shock does have some adjustment. Thanks for all the hints.
    I will let you all know as I make progress and how the bike does in Moab.
    What kind of MPGs are you guys getting--worse to best? I am having a hard time getting accurate results as I spend a lot of time warming up the bike.
    Thanks,
    Simba

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