Motorcycle mechanic as career?
Close
         
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
Like Tree25Likes

Thread: Motorcycle mechanic as career?

  1. #1
    Senior Member tcepilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Dayton Ohio
    Posts
    765

    Motorcycle mechanic as career?

    I love working on my t-dub and other bikes, and I have been thinking about becoming a motorcycle mechanic. If there are any mechanics on this forum do you think that would be a good or bad career in today's world?

    Sent from Android for Nook Tablet using Taptalk
    Hoot Gibson and docjekyll2002 like this.
    -tcepilot Hidden Content
    --- Psalm 23 Verses 4-5 ----

    Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I fear no evil,
    for You are with me; Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me.

    You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies; You have anointed
    my head with oil; My cup overflows. (New American Standard Bible)

  2. #2
    Senior Member kj7687's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern California - Inland Empire
    Posts
    2,369

    Thumbs up

    I have worked as an automotive mechanic and I can tell you that I have become quite disillusioned with the whole idea. In theory this sounds like a great job, but in my experience at least, reality is that it's all about speed, knocking out job after job with no concern for doing it right or attention to detail. The "fast" technicians who knock out job after job without a care in the world, screwing everything up and getting multiple "comebacks" get congratulated by management for their "efficiency" and "sales volume" (numbers on paper), while the good technicians (of which there were FEW where I worked) who do an awesome job and make sure everything is just right (example, lug nuts set to proper torque, correct oil viscosity used, etc.) are told that they need to be faster and have their hours cut... Maybe it's just the company I worked for but I got the feeling that a lot of places, if not all, are like that at least to some degree. Unfortunately I think that many of the people who take their vehicles to a shop for service, do so because it isn't that important to them. So there is, sadly, something to be said for the "just get it done" philosophy. Not my cup of tea. I'm incapable of doing something with less than 100 percent effort. I can't bring myself to "half-ass it" and cut corners just to finish a job quickly and make more money. Those are the people who "do well" in this field. And even then, there's not a lot of money to be made, because there are so many people willing to do it. Sorry to tell it to you like this. I was once in your shoes, asking about these things on forums and thinking excitedly about the great possibilities... Good luck if you do decide to try it.
    Last edited by kj7687; 05-13-2014 at 11:43 PM.
    MTLHead, Robbo, wildcat and 1 others like this.
    KJ, just KJ, ok.


    Current rides:
    2004 GMC Sierra 1500, 1999 Toyota 4Runner

    Past rides: 2015 Yamaha XT 250, 1997 Suzuki DR 200, 2007 Honda Ruckus, 2007 Yamaha TW 200, 2007 Kawasaki Ninja 500, 2009 Kawasaki KLX331S; 1994 GMC Sierra 1500, 1987 Nissan Pathfinder, 1992 Acura Integra, 1986 Honda CRX, 1989 Jeep Cherokee, 1994 Chevrolet Astro Van, 1979 Volkswagen Rabbit, 1984 Jeep Cherokee

  3. #3
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Forestburgh, NY
    Posts
    7,990
    Dealerships want parts changers more than they want honest technicians! You will find many right here who know more about our beloved TWs than you will ever find at a Yamaha dealership. The days of taking your vehicle to a competent technician for a serious technical diagnosis are long gone. It is cheaper and more cost effective to put a new carb on your TW than it is to have a dealer shop mechanic rebuild it and tune your bike so it is running right.

    The idea of training to be a motorcycle mechanic is a worthy career choice but it will come with a painful realization that changing parts is where the money is. Working for a shop will be a drag and you will never find the respect a true mechanic deserves. If I had a recommendation for a young and mechanically inclined fellow I would guide you to become a Machinist. Learning the inner workings of engines and the machines that make them will be a far more rewarding career choice. Welder is another great, hands on career choice that will pay you handsomely.

    I was trained by the US Navy back in 1970 to be an Engineman and Aviation Jet Mechanic. After the military I tried for a while as a civilian mechanic but ended up as a Correction Officer in the NY Prison system. Working for a dealership was a complete joke and I felt more like a grease monkey than a mechanic. Chose a career path wisely that will provide a good living but most importantly will give you the respect you deserve while maintaining your interest.

    GaryL
    Be Decisive! Right or Wrong just make a decision. ​ The road of life is paved with flat squirrels that couldn't make a decision.

    Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
    If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    1987 Yamaha BW350 Big Wheel
    2017 Snowdog Track sled tow motor for ice fishing
    Kubota BX2370 Subcompact tractor with snow blower
    Wilderness System Ride 115 fishing Kayaks

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    annapolis valley nova scotia canada
    Posts
    184
    i agree with garyl and kj7687 ,as a retired auto tech for over 40 years the trade is not as rewarding as it used to be .the only way you can controll the quality of work and mantain a good customer base is to open your own shop.but first you have to get your papers and that means working for someone else tocomplete the apprenticeship process,and get as much knowhow as you can .most people don't like to pay as much to fix their bike as they would their car,so the door rates arn't as high as a automotive shop.there are other trades that pay better ,witch means you could turn your desire of bikes from a hobby to a small shop sooner.in the real world it still takes cash to start any kind of busness ,so the higher up the pay scale you start at the easer it is to get started.
    Fred likes this.

  6. #5
    Senior Member docjekyll2002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    648
    Doh. I'm in the process of applying for the automotive mechanics program at my college since i like working on my TW. I have no passion to be in the medical, science, liberal arts or law field, etc. my dream job would be to be a a mechanic in a Dakar race? Is there anyone here who recommends me going into dentistry or medical and makes a lot of money without so many years of schooling?

  7. #6
    Senior Member Borneo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    6,368
    You can look for something you love and do it for a living and hope you still love it when you have to do it every day for forty years. Or you can find something that is interesting, that you can tolerate well, that is kind to your body as it ages and pays very well...and then use that money to do what you love when you are not working. I tried doing what I loved as a profession and found I did not love it very well when I had to do it every day.

    Is there anyone here who recommends me going into dentistry or medical and makes a lot of money without so many years of schooling?
    It may be you just mis-stated that. If not, you are mis-informed. Dentistry and the Medical professions take a tremendous amount of schooling...and a tremendous amount of money to get that schooling.
    wildcat likes this.
    Twelve rules will get you through life with style.
    Hidden Content

    my blog Hidden Content

  8. #7
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    annapolis valley nova scotia canada
    Posts
    184
    dream jobs are just that dreams.for most mechanics it was a dream to be on a race team of some kind. but to get that spot you have to be at the top in the feild,and be at the right place at the right time or know someone to get your foot in the door.the numbers speak for themselves,millions of mechanics in the trade only a few thousands in race teams.it takes a lot of dedication and scrafice to reach your dream job.most get side tracked with family and other comitments of the dayly walk of life,but i wish you well if you decide to follow your dream.

  9. #8
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Forestburgh, NY
    Posts
    7,990
    Some guys and gals are good at school with studies and have the financial backing to spend many years pursuing particular fields. If this is you then go for a field that will interest you and pay for the lifestyle you desire. Others are best suited to the trades where some schooling is necessary in the beginning but once trained the experience comes from hands on work doing the job and continually learning and getting better at your chosen field. Any career is a complete drag if it is not doing what you enjoy and a job that maintains your interest.

    Sadly, the things I enjoy doing the most would not put much food on the table or money in the bank. There was a time when having a decent paying government job that also provided for a real retirement pension and other benefits was the way to go. I retired 14 years ago after 27 years at age 49 with a 54% pension based on my final average salary. I am not real sure you younger folks can do this today with any real expectation that your state won't go belly up or that social security will in fact be there. It is imperative that you plan wisely now and start your own retirement fund so you too will be able to sit at your computers when you hit 62 and play here on the TW forum and then go jump on your bike or just go fishing and not have to worry about paying the bills.

    One thing I can tell you from the wisdom my age has afforded me is I wish I had the wisdom back when I was 18 and planned much better than I did. I am not hurting but I am not rich either and all this wishing does not seem to produce much of anything but dreams. Do exactly the opposite of what our government does. Live within your means and of every hundred dollars you earn put $25 away every single week. I call it Pay Yourself First!

    GaryL
    1 Bad dog likes this.
    Be Decisive! Right or Wrong just make a decision. ​ The road of life is paved with flat squirrels that couldn't make a decision.

    Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
    If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    1987 Yamaha BW350 Big Wheel
    2017 Snowdog Track sled tow motor for ice fishing
    Kubota BX2370 Subcompact tractor with snow blower
    Wilderness System Ride 115 fishing Kayaks

  10. #9
    Senior Member Borneo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    6,368
    Live within your means and of every hundred dollars you earn put $25 away every single week.
    And that young friends, is the secret of a happy life. And, I'm pretty sure Gary L doesn't consider living within your means to mean being able to pay the minimum payment on your credit cards.
    Last edited by Borneo; 05-14-2014 at 07:25 AM.
    Twelve rules will get you through life with style.
    Hidden Content

    my blog Hidden Content

  11. #10
    Senior Member Hoot Gibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Grand Lake Ohio
    Posts
    4,385
    Quote Originally Posted by tcepilot View Post
    I love working on my t-dub and other bikes, and I have been thinking about becoming a motorcycle mechanic. If there are any mechanics on this forum do you think that would be a good or bad career in today's world?

    Sent from Android for Nook Tablet using Taptalk
    Go for it! Living 60 miles or so north of Dayton, I need a good mechanic for the new Tw and any other bikes my old mind might decide to purchase in a moment of weakness....get that certificate and you have at least one customer...
    tcepilot likes this.
    Hoot's Ride Slide Show Music Videos

    Hidden Content

    TW Adventure Rides Completed
    March 2015 Moab: With 30 TW Forum Friends..
    Summer 2015 Great Lakes, Wisconsin, UP of Michigan, With Borneo and Montezuma
    November 2015: SE Ohio/West Virginia w/ Borneo and Montezuma
    March 2016: Big Bend NP in South Texas w/ Montezuma, Borneo, Ebbanflood and FW Gary
    August 2016: Montezuma and Hoot's Covered Bridge Ride in Southern Indiana

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. San Francisco Mechanic Recommendations
    By rtbuckingham in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-08-2013, 01:01 PM
  2. Advice for shop mechanic taking stock carburetor screws out?
    By docjekyll2002 in forum Technical Help
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 09-02-2013, 07:06 PM
  3. New guy...new motorcycle
    By twRob in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 09-19-2012, 08:50 AM
  4. What makes a good mechanic?
    By Dave Nafziger in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 10-31-2011, 05:02 PM
  5. Got my first motorcycle!
    By Beewerks in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-20-2011, 08:35 AM