A very scary correlation and statistic.
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    Senior Member Borneo's Avatar
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    A very scary correlation and statistic.

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    Senior Member Ebbanflood's Avatar
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    Wow, That is scary. It is great to see the research that is being done particularly in relation to the gut. I truly believe that the answer lies in the gut and the bodys' ability to absorb necessary nutrients. Many of our children in the autism spectrum have similar dietary and digestive disorders. I am very hopeful that that through this research, my Daughter who has an autistic Brother will not have an autistic child.

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    Senior Member Hoot Gibson's Avatar
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    My youngest son, is a {bragging a bit here} well known Autism Guy....he traveled the US, Canada, and the Islands in the Carib, working with Autistic Children, until he decided to stay closer to home and make sure his sons will grow up right, so he went independent and now trains teachers so they can recognize the problems....his wife, who has her Law Degree from U of Dayton, has worked in the field for years, and now will retire this January to raise her sons and work part time for Hal's outfit, is also a nationally known expert on Autism.....

    Bottom Line, now that my bragging is done, and Hal is the first to admit it....Autism is the new "Cause" and many of those children diagnosed with Autism frankly just have Mental Retardation and other problems....it is the new cause in some areas....and all is not what it may seem. Being the Father of a Mentally Retarded adult daughter(and retarded is not a dirty word}....and the Board President of a non profit residential group home{s}....I see this all the time, most involved in this field are good people doing it for the right reasons....some are out looking for grant money, fame, and self importance.
    Last edited by Hoot Gibson; 12-23-2014 at 08:43 AM.
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    Senior Member Ebbanflood's Avatar
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    I agree with you on many of the assessments. The problem with many schools in our area is that they send "problem" children to Special Education. There is a mix of children with developmental disorders in class with normally developing children who are too disruptive or just too disobedient to be in a regular class. I am fortunate that my Son is in a school that is only for children with a diagnosis of autism. Not just his class, the entire school. Now it is my turn to brag, my Daughter is graduating from college this week and will receive her degree and Teaching Certificate. The school where she currently is student teaching uses her to evaluate children to decide if further evaluation is required. She will be starting her Masters in Special Education next but as I often tell her, after 20 years living, playing and helping my Son, she truly is an expert in the field.

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    Senior Member Hoot Gibson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ebbanflood View Post
    I agree with you on many of the assessments. The problem with many schools in our area is that they send "problem" children to Special Education. There is a mix of children with developmental disorders in class with normally developing children who are too disruptive or just too disobedient to be in a regular class. I am fortunate that my Son is in a school that is only for children with a diagnosis of autism. Not just his class, the entire school. Now it is my turn to brag, my Daughter is graduating from college this week and will receive her degree and Teaching Certificate. The school where she currently is student teaching uses her to evaluate children to decide if further evaluation is required. She will be starting her Masters in Special Education next but as I often tell her, after 20 years living, playing and helping my Son, she truly is an expert in the field.
    That's great, we need "qualified" Special Ed Teachers...my wife taught Special Ed and Severe Behavior Kids as well for 30 years, and now semi-retired, she writes the IEP on Kids who have issues and do most of their school work through the Internet....our family, through teaching, involvement with boards, personal family experiences, have been involved with this since our 35 year old daughter was determined to be Mentally Retarded, at age 2....it can be a rewarding career, but she will have to do battle with regular classroom teachers, clueless Superintendents and others in Public and Private Education...We Wish Her Our Best!
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    Senior Member Borneo's Avatar
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    One of my very best friends is a Special Education teacher. And a tremendously good one. One of the ones that really, really cares. But, the job takes a toll on them, so keeping good ones is very hard. Here is a generally accepted statistic:

    The attrition, or “burn-out,” rate for special education teachers is extremely high compared to most other professions. 50% of special education teachers leave their jobs within 5 years. Half of those who make it past 5 years will leave within 10 years. This equates to a 75% turnover rate every 10 years (Dage, 2006).
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    Senior Member Tirebiter's Avatar
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    Besides Autism, other chronic diseases are possibly linked to Roundup herbicide, like the correlation Borneo linked to.

    My family lives in a farming area and no-till farming (using herbicides instead of plowing/cultivating) is common. My 40 yr old niece suddenly got Celiac disease. The doctor said he'd seen a number of cases and said recent studies show possible links to the increased use of herbicides.

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    Senior Member spd2918's Avatar
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    That's problem with correlation studies; they prove nothing and infer causation. One could point to any two things that are on the rise and infer they are related.

    From my perspective autism is new ADD. If a doctor can't explain a child's behavior then the child is deemed to be autistic. Sent in the government money, we got us a disability over here.

    The "over-diagnosis" pulls resources away from kids that actually need help.
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    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borneo View Post
    One of my very best friends is a Special Education teacher. And a tremendously good one. One of the ones that really, really cares. But, the job takes a toll on them, so keeping good ones is very hard. Here is a generally accepted statistic:

    The attrition, or “burn-out,” rate for special education teachers is extremely high compared to most other professions. 50% of special education teachers leave their jobs within 5 years. Half of those who make it past 5 years will leave within 10 years. This equates to a 75% turnover rate every 10 years (Dage, 2006).
    Those turnover rates are no different than general ed teachers.

    Quote Originally Posted by spd2918 View Post
    That's problem with correlation studies; they prove nothing and infer causation. One could point to any two things that are on the rise and infer they are related.

    From my perspective autism is new ADD. If a doctor can't explain a child's behavior then the child is deemed to be autistic. Sent in the government money, we got us a disability over here.

    The "over-diagnosis" pulls resources away from kids that actually need help.
    Though I am degreed special ed, I choose licensure in regular ed to catch the children falling through the cracks. My area of specialty was diagnosis and remediation of ADHD and common comorbid disorders that affected academic performance, especially depression paranoia, and schizophrenia. I was invited to Harvard for post grad work in the fields of learning disabilities and their relations to aberrant psychology. That you've noted those who live with people with disabilities provide better accommodations is true.

    On the other hand, lets not speak of people with challenges as labeled. A person is a person. A person may have conditions such as ADHD, mental retardation, and/or autism, and should be referred to as "having ADHD" or whatever. Let's not label people as being ADHD, mentally retarded, or autistic or all you'll get is the expectations of the label. A child raised with the notion she is mentally retarded will almost never achieve what a child raised with the notion she has a condition called mental retardation will achieve. It's a subtle difference in how we consider and speak of and to people, but has a major affect on outcomes. Having a condition to overcome is much easier than being defective.

    One of my former students was a huge young man of color with mental retardation. He is now a beloved youth pastor. His cousin also has mental retardation, and he is a beloved and trusted caregiver of 4-year olds in a day care center. They both overcame their conditions. If you met either in their work environments you'd never suspect either had struggles to achieve. There is nothing wrong with either of them.




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    Senior Member spd2918's Avatar
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    Another career?
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