Thinking about warmer weather and cooking on my smoker.
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Thread: Thinking about warmer weather and cooking on my smoker.

  1. #1
    Senior Member imxlr8tin's Avatar
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    Thinking about warmer weather and cooking on my smoker.

    Its pretty freaking cold around here right now, I'm cleaning the garage which sucks but good all in the same sentence. I'm totally wishing for spring to roll around. which brings my thought process to a recently developed hobby I got into last year when i got tired of looking at the old oil tank in my back yard. After a lip smacking couple of episodes of pit masters, walla I built a smoker. and had great success on my annual 4th of July party. ( in case you didn't know that's when its warm outside). so I'm posting some pics of it and seeing if anybody out there has some good rub recipes or homemade BBQ sauces they want to share, or1399847606461.jpg1399847606896.jpg1399847607396.jpg1402867306607.jpg1402867394535.jpg pics of there grills or smokers.
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    Senior Member Ebbanflood's Avatar
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    I am a beginner, learning everything the hard way. My pork ribs and beef ribs turn out great but the bigger cuts of meat I keep ruining. I recently smoked a turkey breast........it was awful. Send me some tips when you figure it out.

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    Senior Member imxlr8tin's Avatar
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    I did a couple of beef briskets, which turned out pretty good, I tried to maintain the temp around 230 but it would spike to 270 degrees, i did this for about 13 hours over a pan of water . and i used a rub that i found online. and it turned out great.I also bought a redi check BBQ thermometer on eBay. which worked out nice because i didn't need to baby sit the smoker the whole time. I needed to feed a couple pieces of wood in it about every 1 1/2 hours. Everybody says low and slow.

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  5. #4
    rbm
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    Senior Member rbm's Avatar
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    Sounds good!

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    Senior Member Ebbanflood's Avatar
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    Yeah, I did the brisket at 225 for 14 hours and it was too dry. Next I am going to smoke for 6 hours then wrap it in foil for the remaining time.

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    Senior Member imxlr8tin's Avatar
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    Did you have a good fat cap on it, I've read that's important for the meat to stay tender, as well as having a pan of water under it for the duration.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ebbanflood View Post
    Yeah, I did the brisket at 225 for 14 hours and it was too dry. Next I am going to smoke for 6 hours then wrap it in foil for the remaining time.
    Fat cap on top of course so the juices run down through the meat.

  8. #7
    Senior Member spd2918's Avatar
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    I smoke at 200 degrees and pop up to 250 once the internal temp gets to 175. I used a Big Green Egg and moisture is never an issue.

    For rubs I found anything with a little citrus is nice. Lime? Hell yeah.
    An idiot with a thesaurus is still an idiot.

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    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spd2918 View Post
    I smoke at 200 degrees and pop up to 250 once the internal temp gets to 175. I used a Big Green Egg and moisture is never an issue.

    For rubs I found anything with a little citrus is nice. Lime? Hell yeah.
    200 is plenty, and using a good meat thermometer is the best way to go. Sure, Joe Damron can tell everything he needs to know and attain perfection just by resting the back of his hand on the cinderblocks, but he's been doing it for 55 years. The kick up at the end provides a little searing like effect some people prefer as slices tend to stay together better so the serving is more formal, but it isn't really necessary. Good either way.

    175* internal temperature is pretty well done. Solid beef is safe at 125* when slow cooked, anywhere in between is a matter of preference. Ground anything should be 160*.

    Lime is far superior to lemon for a wet rub. Key Lime is the best of all, especially the variety native to the Florida Keys. A little more acidic, a little tart, and a much more robust flavor than others. The Mexican variety is also superb. They Cuban variety is a little less tart and slightly sweet. Key lime combined with orange blossom honey makes a Sweet Tart rub that is amazing on pork. Cut the honey by 50% and add a bit of bourbon for beef. I'm a little tainted because all my citrus juices come from private stashes of citrus growers who squeeze their own from the finest garden (not commercial) varieties, tree ripened to perfection (not picked green and gas ripened as commercial crops are done). I don't do commercial citrus anything. I'm spoiled when it comes to citrus products.

    Brisket is a cheap, tough cut, and that makes brisket very difficult to make delicious. Get yourself a decent roast. You won't regret it.



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