Cathedral Valley trip
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Thread: Cathedral Valley trip

  1. #1
    Senior Member bad luck's Avatar
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    Cathedral Valley trip

    I guess this is the best place to post this, since it isn't related to our bikes. My wife was off work Wednesday and Thursday, so we thought we would take a little trip over to Capitol Reef N.P. and do the Cathedral Valley loop.
    She wanted to come but refused to ride on the back of the little dual sport bike. (I can't blame her for that, she rode behind a few years ago, on a 100 mile trip, and both our rears were sore for days) So we took the jeep.
    After checking in at the parks visitor center, and visiting with a ranger friend there we took off. The loop begins outside the park a couple miles, with a river ford of the Fremont River, I tried to get her to get out and walk across the river, so she could take some pics of me crossing in the jeep, but she flat out refused. I don't think she is a team player, Ha. After all the water was only about 10" deep.
    So then we came on this old truck and trailer, maybe some kind of well drilling rig? After that we crossed over the Bentonite Hills. I'm glad it was dry, they told us that it was totally impassable if they get wet.
    About halfway through the loop is the campground, very nice with junipers for shade, but at 7000 ft elevation, I think it would have gotten pretty chilly early in the morning. Anyway it was too early in the day for stopping.
    After passing some more nice scenery we came to the Morrell line cabin, this was built in the 1920's and in the early 30's it was dismantled and reassembled it this location. Cowboys used it until 1970, when the park came into existence.
    Next up came the large sinkhole, this held a plug of gypsum which dissolved, and formed the sinkhole, I tried to convince Monique to climb down and check it out, but you can guess another flat refusal.
    And we worked our way down hill some more till we arrived at the side spur to the Temple of the Sun, Temple of the Moon, and Glass Mountain. I really think that the name should be changed to Glass Hill though, it's not that big, but it is damn cool.
    We were out of the park again by the time we came on another little side spur on blm land, so we took and set up our camp for the night, Monique wanted to sleep in the tent, while I stayed outside on the cot. I'm really glad I did, the sky was fantastic after the moon set, and the stars were incredible, they say that the middle of Utah has some of the darkest skies in the country. Great for star gazing. But I forgot my tripod, so no night time shots.
    After leaving camp the next morning we drove back to Hanksville, fueled up and stopped in Goblin Valley because she has not been there in almost 20 years, after wandering around admiring the hoodoos we headed up to Green River to get one of their famous watermelons, then back home.

    P9070002.jpgP9070008.jpgP9070010.jpgP9070026.jpg
    Last edited by bad luck; 09-09-2016 at 08:46 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bad luck's Avatar
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    I didn't include pictures of Goblin Valley. If anyone wants to see them I can post them later on.
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    Last edited by bad luck; 09-09-2016 at 07:19 AM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dryden-Tdub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad luck View Post
    I didn't include pictures of Goblin Valley. If anyone wants to see them I can post them later on.
    How about a report on your "Kodiak flex bow" tent? I have used one and since then have recommended them many times over. Incredible quality at that price point!


    Tom
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  5. #4
    Senior Member bad luck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dryden-Tdub View Post
    How about a report on your "Kodiak flex bow" tent? I have used one and since then have recommended them many times over. Incredible quality at that price point!


    Tom
    Hi Tom,
    O.K. but it's not a Kodiak, it is the original U.S. designed and built Springbar, made up in Salt Lake City. It costs a little more than the Kodiak but I prefer to buy U.S. if it's not a ton more.
    We haven't had it for too long, just got it this spring, and we took it out on 3 rafting trips. About 10 nights in it total so far.
    But I'm very pleased with it, on the Ruby-Horsethief section of the Colorado, we camped for 2 nights in the same spot.
    And we had a terrific thunderstorm one night, the rain came down so hard, I was sure we would get soaked but not a drop came in. And the wind blew up to about 30 to 40 mph gusts, but again no problems.
    I can't say the same for the other people in our group, I don't know what kind of tents they had, but all of them got drenched.
    On the night that we camped on the trip to Cathedral Valley, the gnats or whatever kind of insects were pretty bad, I didn't get a single bite, but Monique must be allergic or something, because she had over 100.
    So they do make a net enclosure for the front of the tent, and I think we will get one, then we can face the tent away from the setting sun have shade and protection from the hungry little #&*">%$.
    The tent is easy to set up,by one person, but it has to be staked down, it can't be freestanding. So that might be a problem if a person wants to camp right on slickrock, which I do like to do. I know a lot of people like to camp on sandy spots, but to me it's too messy.
    There are very large vent screens in the front and back, so we have great ventilation, I don't know what else to say about it, except I would buy another one right away if it got stolen or something. And it does have quality YKK zippers which is important to me.
    The folks at Kirkhams who make these tents, told me that some people have had their tents for over 40 years and they can still get parts and repairs for them.
    Another potential problem with these and the Kodiaks is that you need to dry and clean them after they get wet and muddy, some people might not have enough room to erect them indoors if it is nasty weather when they return home.
    (remember they must be staked down) So that leaves out putting them up in your living room or basement. But lucky for me I have a garage with a wooden floor up on the 2nd floor which is perfect, I just use small lag screws and set it up there.
    Of course these are far too large and heavy to take on our bikes, but for car camping and rafting they are ideal. Mine is the 3 person model, which is nice and roomy for the 2 of us, but it could sleep 4 in a pinch, and we can stand up in it.
    I think I might get a hammock to use if I take the Tdub out camping alone though, if I'm going somewhere with trees. Those Hennessy hammocks seem to be very cool and light, although I've never slept in a hammock I have been told they are super comfy.
    Last edited by bad luck; 09-09-2016 at 10:24 AM.
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  6. #5
    Senior Member Dryden-Tdub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad luck View Post
    Hi Tom,
    O.K. but it's not a Kodiak, it is the original U.S. designed and built Springbar, made up in Salt Lake City. It costs a little more than the Kodiak but I prefer to buy U.S. if it's not a ton more.
    We haven't had it for too long, just got it this spring, and we took it out on 3 rafting trips. About 10 nights in it total so far.
    But I'm very pleased with it, on the Ruby-Horsethief section of the Colorado, we camped for 2 nights in the same spot.
    And we had a terrific thunderstorm one night, the rain came down so hard, I was sure we would get soaked but not a drop came in. And the wind blew up to about 30 to 40 mph gusts, but again no problems.
    I can't say the same for the other people in our group, I don't know what kind of tents they had, but all of them got drenched.
    On the night that we camped on the trip to Cathedral Valley, the gnats or whatever kind of insects were pretty bad, I didn't get a single bite, but Monique must be allergic or something, because she had over 100.
    So they do make a net enclosure for the front of the tent, and I think we will get one, then we can face the tent away from the setting sun have shade and protection from the hungry little #&*">%$.
    The tent is easy to set up,by one person, but it has to be staked down, it can't be freestanding. So that might be a problem if a person wants to camp right on slickrock, which I do like to do. I know a lot of people like to camp on sandy spots, but to me it's too messy.
    There are very large vent screens in the front and back, so we have great ventilation, I don't know what else to say about it, except I would buy another one right away if it got stolen or something. And it does have quality YKK zippers which is important to me.
    The folks at Kirkhams who make these tents, told me that some people have had their tents for over 40 years and they can still get parts and repairs for them.
    Another potential problem with these and the Kodiaks is that you need to dry and clean them after they get wet and muddy, some people might not have enough room to erect them indoors if it is nasty weather when they return home.
    (remember they must be staked down) So that leaves out putting them up in your living room or basement. But lucky for me I have a garage with a wooden floor up on the 2nd floor which is perfect, I just use small lag screws and set it up there.
    Of course these are far too large and heavy to take on our bikes, but for car camping and rafting they are ideal. Mine is the 3 person model, which is nice and roomy for the 2 of us, but it could sleep 4 in a pinch, and we can stand up in it.
    I think I might get a hammock to use if I take the Tdub out camping alone though, if I'm going somewhere with trees. Those Hennessy hammocks seem to be very cool and light, although I've never slept in a hammock I have been told they are super comfy.
    Great report. I had no idea they still made the original Springbar! All valid points that you make about size and maintenance demands but these tents are best for extended stays not simple overnights in the back yard. I used the one I borrowed for annual archery deer hunts in Michigan. I could not imagine a better tent for multi day trips in any weather.

    Now onto the hammock..... I own and regularly use a Hennessey Explorer deluxe asym zip. Best nights sleep that can be had in the outdoors! Perhaps I could set it up and post either some pics or videos? Not unlike your Springbar though there are some minimum requirements which are limited to either two trees or a portable hammock stand. There are no shortage of trees here in upstate New York


    Tom

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    bad luck likes this.
    It won't be greed which destroys America. It will be envy.

    Man who runs in front of motorcycle gets tired. Man who runs behind motorcycle gets exhausted.

  7. #6
    Senior Member bad luck's Avatar
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    Hey Tom,
    I would really enjoy reading your review or video or whatever you could do about the hammocks. The reason I even thought about a hammock, is I met a guy camping the other day up in the La Sal mountains behind town. And he showed me his Hennessy Hammock, and told me how comfortable it was. It had the rain fly over the hammock, with bug netting just below the rain fly. His had a zipper, and he explained how he even uses it no matter the weather with one of those reflective bubble insulation mats that he puts below him while in the hammock in cold weather. He also said it didn't matter if the ground was rocky or full of cactus or whatever as long as he could get in it. So I am very interested in a review from you. By the way what does the asym zip mean? I know it has a zipper but the asym? We do have lots and lots of trees up in the mountains too, but the guy who showed me his said he had a Ural sidecar rig, (which is sooo cool) and that he had rigged up a pole to the bike and on the other end he used a pole and just some guy ropes to stakes if he was in the desert or someplace without trees.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Dryden-Tdub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad luck View Post
    Hey Tom,
    I would really enjoy reading your review or video or whatever you could do about the hammocks. The reason I even thought about a hammock, is I met a guy camping the other day up in the La Sal mountains behind town. And he showed me his Hennessy Hammock, and told me how comfortable it was. It had the rain fly over the hammock, with bug netting just below the rain fly. His had a zipper, and he explained how he even uses it no matter the weather with one of those reflective bubble insulation mats that he puts below him while in the hammock in cold weather. He also said it didn't matter if the ground was rocky or full of cactus or whatever as long as he could get in it. So I am very interested in a review from you. By the way what does the asym zip mean? I know it has a zipper but the asym? We do have lots and lots of trees up in the mountains too, but the guy who showed me his said he had a Ural sidecar rig, (which is sooo cool) and that he had rigged up a pole to the bike and on the other end he used a pole and just some guy ropes to stakes if he was in the desert or someplace without trees.
    Asym refers to asymmetric. This is important because it helps describe the way that you actually lay in the hammock. In a traditional hammock you lay straight up and down the middle of the hammock whereas in almost all camping hammocks you lay diagonally in the hammock which enables you to sleep virtually flat just like in your bed. I am a side sleeper and can sleep comfortably on my side or even my stomach. I have posted pictures on the forum of my setup before but have none on this computer. I will post some more over the weekend and maybe even find the time for a video of how quickly it sets up.


    Tom
    arbolmano and bad luck like this.
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    Man who runs in front of motorcycle gets tired. Man who runs behind motorcycle gets exhausted.

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