Sprockets 101, an intro course wanted
Close
    
    
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
Like Tree6Likes

Thread: Sprockets 101, an intro course wanted

  1. #1
    Member yogaman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI area
    Posts
    52

    Sprockets 101, an intro course wanted

    OK, I am new at this.

    But I want my (soon I hope, weather permitting) TW200 to have longer legs.

    The stock set up is 14/50.

    Many of you run 15/50.

    Others have suggested +1 on the front, and -1, -2, or -3 on the back.

    What are the trade off's?

    What about chain wear at different combinations of sprockets?

    I am asking because I am new to chain bikes. Also, I do not want to get too creative because the more variance from OEM could mean loads and stresses that were never meant for the component---like final drives (read: repair $$$) on BMW oilheads and some K bikes.

    Feel free to suggest a link, a book, or other material that could shed some light on this subject.
    TIA,
    Howard
    "The Obstacle is the Path"...B.K.S.Iyengar, commenting on the Practice of Yoga. The Iyengar Style of Yoga is both the most disciplined and precise.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator goldenhtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Stanwood,Wa
    Posts
    1,880
    Alot depends on what type of riding you do the most so you can get the most out of your choice. I myself have 14/52 as I ride 90% off road can still go 60 no problem. I ride pavement to get to my riding area here at home or trailer my bike if going over I90 to ride Eastern Washington. I feel the sweet spot for my setup is 45-50, can cruse all day at that speed on the pavement, but no problem going 60 to get where I need to go as well. Love the 52 for dirt because I don't have to shift as often, can cruse in 3rd-4th gears most of the time on the fire roads. I did not go up in the front because it's a PITA. If I did go up in the front for any reason I would being going up to 55 in the rear. I use my bike to get to some out of the way hunting spots that can get rather tricky sometimes. Hope this helps alittle. Just depends on your riding style like I said. No one on here is going to fault you for any choice. JUST GET RID OF THAT STOCK FRONT TIRE!!! You will thank all of us later.

    Tracy
    scotti158 likes this.
    A very very wise man once said “it’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than a fast bike slow”.

    "Now then get your weapons... and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me"
    Gen:27:3

    “I've noticed that everyone who is for abortion has already been born.”
    -Ronald Reagan

  3. #3
    Senior Member jb882's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    A mere 36 miles north of Rhodetrip
    Posts
    1,375
    The simple trade off is performance. If you go up a tooth on the front its about the equivalent of going to a 47 tooth in the rear. Both of these will yield a little more top end speed if(and its a big if) your terrain permits it( IE hills). The tradeoff of that extra top end speed is less acceleration and possibly a lot of trouble climbing hills. This is something you have to decide you want to pursue and how you plan on riding it will really dictate that. If your plan is to ride around town at around town speeds like you mentioned in another post the factory 14/50 should be just fine for you its a pretty good all around setup and in my opinion Yamaha really nailed it with that combo, they got it right. IMHO if you plan is to try and turn it into a highway bike you really should look at a different bike with a bigger engine, the tw is just not built for high speed. It doesn't have enough power and it not the most stable thing at 65-70 if you can get it there and if there are any hills involved you will never sustain highway speed.

    Chain wear i consider a non issue. If you get a good quality o-ring or x-ring and care for it, you will need new sprockets again by the time you wear it out.

    If you want to see numbers check out this link. http://http://www.sprocketcalculator.com/. The factory chain is 122 links should you decide to play with this.


    Both of my TW's prior owners had changed out the rear sprocket, one to a a 45 the other a 47. Both bikes were total dogs and could not get out of their own ways. They were faster then stock but only on a flat or downhill. Up a hill forget it, they would fall on their face. I put them back to the factory and am much happier, i can ride them comfortably to 55 without feeling like I'm killing it and still climb a hill in the process. The one that had the 45 tooth on it was a real dog. The prior owner tried to make it into a freeway commuter and ended up wearing the engine out way before its time in the process, which is part of the reason he sold it and i have it now(with a fresh rebuilt motor).
    Last edited by jb882; 03-25-2015 at 07:20 PM.
    goldenhtr, Dryden-Tdub and Hekkler like this.
    Pair of 2006 TW's modded to the hilt and a Ducati Multistrada.

    Hidden Content

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member SickPuppy76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Glenville, NY The Vampire State
    Posts
    667
    Quote Originally Posted by goldenhtr View Post
    JUST GET RID OF THAT STOCK FRONT TIRE!!! You will thank all of us later.

    Tracy
    What's the deal with the front tire? I've heard this mentioned a few times but don't recall seeing it explained?

    I've only put 75 miles on my new TW and before I got one based on chatter I heard and what the salesman said I thought I'd end up changing sprockets slightly for a few more MPH top end but after riding I feel like I like the way it is just fine. I hit 68 today, which is plenty fast for me, but I won't be driving sustained 60+ very often at all.
    "SickPuppy76"
    Greg from Glenville

    2014 TW200 rear Cyclerack with bag supports and Versapack saddlebags, upgraded foot pegs, Mad Dog seat cover
    2014 Nissan Pathfinder 4WD
    2005 Buick Rainier AWD
    2001 Bass Tracker Pro Team 185XT
    Old Town Trip10 Angler Kayak

  6. #5
    Senior Member jb882's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    A mere 36 miles north of Rhodetrip
    Posts
    1,375
    Quote Originally Posted by SickPuppy76 View Post
    What's the deal with the front tire? I've heard this mentioned a few times but don't recall seeing it explained?

    I've only put 75 miles on my new TW and before I got one based on chatter I heard and what the salesman said I thought I'd end up changing sprockets slightly for a few more MPH top end but after riding I feel like I like the way it is just fine. I hit 68 today, which is plenty fast for me, but I won't be driving sustained 60+ very often at all.
    Well, its nicknamed the "deathwing" for a reason. In a nutshell its not a good tire at all, they cup badly and are really loud on the road when they wear a little. I also found the tire to be what i call squirmy when leaned over in the corner, not very confidence inspiring. Off road they are pretty much useless and wash out on anything hard packed. Why Yamaha still puts this tire on the front is beyond me. The stock rear is fine and is a good tire, the front...garbage.

    There are a lot better options out there. This thread lists a lot of options https://tw200forum.com/forum/performa...e-choices.html. The Shinko 244 and Kenda 270 are two that are very popular on this forum and are tried and true options. I personally run the Shinko 244 on both of mine and an very pleased. it does everything better than the stocker.
    Last edited by jb882; 03-25-2015 at 07:35 PM.
    goldenhtr likes this.
    Pair of 2006 TW's modded to the hilt and a Ducati Multistrada.

    Hidden Content

  7. #6
    Senior Member old w/??'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    971
    Generally, from a stock setup; a1 tooth change on the front (smaller/larger) is equal to a 3 tooth change on the rear in the other direction (smaller/larger).
    The TW is different than other bikes in that a front sprocket change requires the engine's left side-cover be removed and oil drained or bike leaned over - and caution used to not pinch/cut a couple of wires during the process. Thus, unless the front sprocket is worn and needs to be replaced, it is much easier to change the rear sprocket.

    My thoughts are that just because a bike can be gotten up to a certain speed (say 65) doesn't mean I want to ride it there. The stability is fine for me; but at higher speeds (say 60 plus) IN TRAFFIC - I want the ability to accelerate out of a situation. At those speeds, the TW doesn't have that acceleration, so I don't consider it a freeway bike - although many here consider it fine and do it a-lot.

    For a few sprocket tests I have done, read the thread: 45 tooth rear sprocket evaluation on pavement . The huge difference in going to the 45 tooth rear was the more comfortable smooth ride from the reduction in vibration due to the lower rpms per mph at the higher speeds.

    -J-
    Last edited by old w/??; 03-25-2015 at 11:21 PM.
    admiral likes this.

  8. #7
    Member yogaman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI area
    Posts
    52
    old w/2 many guns and bikes,
    What is the date of posting on that thread?

    Going from a stock to 50 to 45 is a 10% reduction in teeth. Did the RPM at higher speeds drop by at least 10%? On the flip side, did the minimum RPM increase to keep the bike moving without coughing or burping? (Try riding a stock Duc below 3500RPM in the city)
    Best,
    H
    "The Obstacle is the Path"...B.K.S.Iyengar, commenting on the Practice of Yoga. The Iyengar Style of Yoga is both the most disciplined and precise.

  9. #8
    Senior Member jb882's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    A mere 36 miles north of Rhodetrip
    Posts
    1,375
    Quote Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
    old w/2 many guns and bikes,
    What is the date of posting on that thread?

    Going from a stock to 50 to 45 is a 10% reduction in teeth. Did the RPM at higher speeds drop by at least 10%? On the flip side, did the minimum RPM increase to keep the bike moving without coughing or burping? (Try riding a stock Duc below 3500RPM in the city)
    Best,
    H
    It will be about a 10% drop in rpm at like 65mph. Just keep in mind that with that gearing an already acceleration challenged bike will become acceleration crippled due to the loss in torque to the rear wheel.

    The TW doesn't really have any harshness at low RPM like a Ducati does. Its such a mild state of tune that its pretty well mannered. I understand exactly where you are coming from tho, my Multistrada was like a bucking bronco at 3500 or less until i ditched the exhaust valve, replaced the factory exhaust and put a set of fat ducs on it.
    Pair of 2006 TW's modded to the hilt and a Ducati Multistrada.

    Hidden Content

  10. #9
    Senior Member GHDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Gold Hill, Colorado
    Posts
    285

    Look At This Calculator

    Quote Originally Posted by yogaman View Post

    Going from a stock to 50 to 45 is a 10% reduction in teeth. Did the RPM at higher speeds drop by at least 10%? H
    If you didn't look at a sprocket calculator, do so now and it will answer your gearing question (though not the engine performance one). This one is rather more useful than the one referenced above. Of course, you can't assume that the engine is capable of the same rpm's at the higher load.

    I'm about to change out a TW we recently acquired for my wife (putting on O-ring chain and two new sprockets, parts arriving next week) and am sticking with stock gearing. On my TW I've found that it's about right - will go as fast on the highway as I want to go, but still has enough power for off-road or upgrades. Well, not a LOT of power, but as much as can be expected from this machine!

  11. #10
    Member 1 Bad dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    West coast of Iowa
    Posts
    40
    On gravel and dirt the stock tire goes where it wants, you have to wrestle it all the time. I put on a Shinko 241 and it goes where I point it, have much better control. There are many threads on tires and many opinions. No one keeps stock tire long.
    Dave

    2010 TW200
    Dmo Foot pegs
    2" risers
    Shinko 241 front tire
    XT350 steel gas tank
    Jimbo shield

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Intro
    By one4fishing in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-25-2015, 01:04 PM
  2. Intro
    By Mud Dog in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 03-08-2015, 10:03 AM
  3. Hi all. ... New TW rider intro
    By Bentzra in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-29-2014, 06:44 PM
  4. Hawaii(Oahu) intro
    By renny10n in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-16-2014, 07:19 PM
  5. A short intro
    By vanillagorilla1 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-05-2013, 01:07 PM