Conversion to TTR125 Ignition
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  1. #1
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    OK folks here we are... The nitty-gritty details of converting my 1991 TW200 to the ignition system from a 2003 TTR125



    Yamaha cannot/will not sell me a CDI for this model. Apparently they don't have any more of them, and used parts are getting hard to find.



    The basis of the conversion itself is pretty simple. The object is to replace the source coil on the stator assembly and the pulser coil inside the left engine cover with the parts from the TTR125, and then use the CDI from the TTR and the short wiring harness that belongs to it to connect to the source coil and pulser coil. I also replaced the "high tension coil" that fires the spark plug with the TTR unit as it came with the rest of the parts I purchased. Unclear at this time as to whether the TW high tension coil will work, but not sure why not.



    I will get you all a schematic of how the wiring is connected in the next few days. For now just some pictures of the whole process.



    2003 TTR125 sidecover/stator/pulser coil





    1991 TW200 sidecover/stator/pulser coil





    side by side comparison of TW/TTR covers/stators





    ttr stator and pulser coil removed from sidecover





    bare ttr sidecover





    tw stator assembly. pulser coil is lower left, wires from stator exit top center, big coil pictured @ 11 o'clock is "source coil"





    stupid "source coil" for TTR is welded into the stator ring assembly. But don't worry we can fix with Mr. Dewalt grinder. Just grind the welds and hit with a punch to remove from stator ring.





    TTR source coil removed from stator assembly, pictured with harness and pulser coil





    TTR source coil

    ITCB

  2. #2
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    I failed to grind the welds completely, so I just cut the stator ring and then was able to easily remove each laminated piece of sheet steel from the TTR source coil. You shouldn't need to do this unless you are a barbarian like myself.





    TTR pulser coil test fit in TW sidecover





    TTR pulser coil test fit #2





    Backside of 1991 TW200 stator when removed from sidecover





    TW200 sidecover with stator removed and TTR pulser coil installed





    Removing the TW200 "source coil" from the stator assembly is not to bad. It is not welded in like the TTR coil, so I was able to vise the source coil and then use light taps with a ball peen hammer to slide the stator off.





    TW200 source coil removed from stator

    ITCB

  3. #3
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    Original grommet from TW200 wiring lets the two pulser coil wires exit the side cover. There are two individual wire-size holes in the grommet, so I drilled out to one large hole and then split it with a knife so that it could be used. The TTR125 grommet is too wide to fit in the case. I'm lazy so the old TTR grommet was just left on the wires.







    TTR Pulser coil in place. The mounting "ears" on the TTR coil are not wide enough for the TW sidecover, so I bent/cut them into an arrangement that would hold the coil in place using the stock TW200 retainer clips. Unfortunately this did not retain the coil properly, and if you pushed on it just right, it could move into the path of the flywheel.







    Completely assembled.







    To fix the pulser coil mounting issues, I fashioned a spring clip out of a piece of wire from something else. As you can see here, it is behind the two "posts" in the sidecover, and then wraps around the bottom-front of the pulser coil to keep it from being able to move into the path of the flywheel in the future. Also shown here are the bent mounting ears to hold the top of the pulser coil behind the "posts" in the sidecover.







    Front shot of home-made spring clip, and also pulser coil seating depth. You can see two faint lines scratched on the left "post" here... I scribed a line at the depth of the original magnet from the stock pulser coil so I would know how far down to seat the TTR coil.



    It turns out that the TTR coil needs to be almost touching the bottom of the sidecover. Unfortunately the red and white wires are connected to the coil on the bottom with protruding solder connections, and it would be possible for them to short out on the engine case if touching.



    To remedy this I used a piece of cardboard from a cigarette pack (the same one that used to house my discombobulated TW CDI) and wrapped it in electrical tape. This gives me just enough thickness to keep the pulser coil from touching the sidecover while still being seated at the proper depth. Ghetto, I know, but with the pulser coil fully mounted it is impossible to pull out the tape/cardboard contraption.







    Wires coming out between frame and shock assembly are from the source coil harness. These connect to the TTR CDI and live nicely under the seat. Heavy gauge yellow wire shown is used to provide ground to the TTR high tension spark plug coil. Will go into more detail on that later.







    Shown here is the area under the right plastic side cover under the seat. TTR CDI is mounted in same location as stock CDI. White connector in bottom right is from pulser coil.



    ITCB

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  5. #4
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    Oh, so I have 175 miles on this setup and it is working excellently.



    <Going to use this space for details on what wires are connected where>



    Let me know if you have any questions or need more detailed pictures of particular areas. I need to pull the sidecover off sometime in the very near future to fix an oil leak.



    Speaking of oil leak, i have a random copper or brass washer that came from somewhere in the sidecover that may be causing the leak. If anyone knows where this goes it would be appreciated
    ITCB

  6. #5
    Senior Member jwtwrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operose View Post
    Oh, so I have 175 miles on this setup and it is working excellently.



    <Going to use this space for details on what wires are connected where>



    Let me know if you have any questions or need more detailed pictures of particular areas. I need to pull the sidecover off sometime in the very near future to fix an oil leak.



    Speaking of oil leak, i have a random copper or brass washer that came from somewhere in the sidecover that may be causing the leak. If anyone knows where this goes it would be appreciated
    small washer or large ? if its really tiny it could be from the screws holding the stator by the looks of it you replaced them
    --If at first you don't succeed try, try again. If you still don't succeed BEAT IT WITH A HAMMER!--

  7. #6
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    No it is much larger than that, and is not a regular steel washer...



    The screws holding the stator were not replaced, they just wouldn't come out even with an appropriate right angled screwdriver. I cut the heads with a cutoff wheel on my angle grinder, which heats them up and I guess releases some pressure on the heads. After that they spun right out.
    ITCB

  8. #7
    Member Boedy's Avatar
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    So, what are the benefits? Brighter headlight? Hotter spark?

  9. #8
    Junior Member chisleu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boedy View Post
    So, what are the benefits? Brighter headlight? Hotter spark?




    I think the benefits are working stator?

  10. #9
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    Yeah sorry if the intent was unclear... the benefit is that I can actually ride my motorcycle again. My stator was fine but cdi was fried.



    It does start so much easier than before though so I think it is also giving a hotter spark.



    None of the charging or lighting circuit were changed so it will not make the headlight brighter
    ITCB

  11. #10
    Senior Member operose's Avatar
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    So I guess this thread was never finished. Wiring details and further pics were never posted... If anyone has any questions let me know, but I'm not going to mess with wiring until it is warm out due to lack of shop space.



    Dug this old post back up so that this link could be shared:

    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=189734



    VERY cool post by an electrical engineer- "Stators demystified"
    ITCB

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