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Thread: Krylon Fusion

  1. #1
    Senior Member mtkd's Avatar
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    I have done some searching on the forums about pains that have been used by some of our members. Krylon Fusion comes up alot, I was wondering if anyone who had used it in the past could tell me how well it has held up, and how fine you sanded down the parts before hand?
    -Szj



    2001 TW

  2. #2
    Senior Member Rainman's Avatar
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    I used it and it has held up great. I lightly sanded my parts down, but not very well and the paint has held up great. It did "fisheye" on my rear brake light assembly, but that was because I put it on too thick and it wasn't very clean. Overall, I'm happy with it.
    If you can't find it, grind it

    1990 TW200

  3. #3
    Senior Member dhoenisch's Avatar
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    I used it on a scooter trunk for a riding season... got rained on, kicked it a few times mounting my bike, and it help up just fine. I used some plastic primer under it first. I think it was Rustoleum, but I can't remember as this was a couple years ago.



    Dan
    2009 Yamaha TW200

    1996 Yamaha Virago 1100

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Stromper's Avatar
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    If its not ancient there may still be silicone mold release on the parts



    Test first but if OK a wipe with preps all or even brake clean definitely test on back side it might melt some like abs



    Just before you paint take a propane torch with a blue flame and wave it for an instant over the surface.

    Do not hold it any time just wisk it over. This degrades the outer most molecules and gives the paint something to grab..... weird but true mister Ripley



    For simple colors I also use Duplicolor BUMPER paint as its flexible

  6. #5
    Senior Member PJungnitsch's Avatar
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    I find it is good but not great. It chips and scratches fairly easily, so anything I've done has to be touched up at least once a year. The seat is especially bad unless covered up with a seat pad. The gloss paint will also make any scratches from panel wear and tear or even light sanding show up. Did have some issues with fish eyes as well on a few panels, but giving a coat and letting it dry before respraying fixed it.



    I'd probably try one of the plastic bumper paints next time.

  7. #6
    Junior Member rhys's Avatar
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    I've used it on some things and it appears to be alright. After cleaning the plastic with soap and water, rinsing it well, I scuffed the plastic with a green scotch pad then cleaned it again. Once dry the paint will stick faily well. It does scratch and by itself is not as strong as I would us on my bike. However, if you want the best option, follow the same prep and use Bulldog adhesion promoter before your base coat (even with the fusion). I have done baseball helmets with this process followed by a SystemThree water-based WR-LPU 2-part polyurethane topcoat (clear). The WR-LPU is designed for use on boats in the marine environment so plastic is not a problem. My first batting helmet was done 3 years ago and is still going strong (my instructions to my son was throw it around, beat it up, and don't take care of it so we can see just how good the Bulldog & WR-LPU works). He throws it, drops it, kicks it, and just beats the crap out of it. Despite rocks and the occasional baseball hitting it there is nothing more than small dings where sharp rocks have dug into the plastic. There are very few scratches in it. The paint has not pealed, pulled or shown any adhesion failures of any type. I have thought about doing the plastics on my TW and when I do, I would go this route without hesitation. In case you are wondering, rather than just Fusion paint, the helmets have the following done to them: prep as described above, 3 coats of Bulldog (they must be done within a specific time to adhere to the plastic and eachother), first primer/base coat within 10 minutes of final Bulldog coat (same rule as the primer/basecoat bonds with the Bulldog), 2 more coats, 3 coats of silver, stencil and airbrush work, 8-12 coats of candy, 3 coats of the WR-LPLU clear (makes the candy pop and protects the substrate). If you are going to use the Fusion, I would replace the painting parts with the fusion followed by the WR-LPU. I would think this would be about as tough as you are going to find.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Stromper's Avatar
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    What is wr lpu



    what is manufacturer and probable sales point?

  9. #8
    Junior Member rhys's Avatar
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    WR-LPU is a 2-part water-based polyurethane made by System Three. While not for below the waterline applications, it is designed for the marine environment and is flexible. The company specializes in marine finish systems (boats and water applications), but also has products furniture manufacturers use (clear epoxies for covering bar and counter-tops etc.-you've seen them). You should be able to find it at any place that specializes in marine coatings, fiberglass building supplies (surfboard material suppliers-I get mine from one in Honolulu), or other specialty shops. Of course your location will determine how best to get it. I live in Hawaii, so ordering it from a distributor is difficult do to hazmat shipping issues, but the continental US should not be a problem finding it and getting it sent to you. If you are close to the east coast and marine supply shops, you can check with them or go to System Three and see where they have dealers or distributors in your area. Rather expensive, but works great. You will need a way to apply it (small spray-gun etc.).

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