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Thread: Sissy Bar Project

  1. #1
    Member brandonjohnson33's Avatar
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    Sissy Bar Project

    I’m using 1/4 wire to play with a simple design for a sissy bar on the TW. I’m going to weld tubing the same size as the rack onto the rack. Obviously not going to use it for a backrest but definitely to tie bags to bc I travel long distances often.
    Dryden-Tdub likes this.
    John 15:13
    Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

    If this verse is true (and it is) then what does it say about Christ’s love? He died for us not when we were His friends but when we were His enemies.

    2015 TW200
    2009 Harley Fat Boy

  2. #2
    Member brandonjohnson33's Avatar
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    While I was waiting for the sissy bar to be bent I made a tool bag for her.
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    John 15:13
    Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

    If this verse is true (and it is) then what does it say about Christ’s love? He died for us not when we were His friends but when we were His enemies.

    2015 TW200
    2009 Harley Fat Boy

  3. #3
    Senior Member excalibur's Avatar
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    I personally would probably remove the exta seat on your rack and use straps or bungies as needed to secure extras.

    I say that as I would personally be afraid I would possibly get tangled up and possibly hurt pretty badly at my age with something like that possibly preventing me for getting "cleanly" off of and away from my bike in the event of the unexpected.

    But that's simply my first impression... but possibly you have engineered something in that I don't see or understand ?

    excalibur
    2010 TW 200 Dual Sport
    2017 Harley Softail Slim w/110 Cubic Inch Screamin' Eagle engine
    2005 Yamaha 450 Kodiak 4x4 Quad

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
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    If you plan to tie anything that high I suggest it be the lightest weight items as it will affect your center of gravity. I also agree that anything that can injure you in an accident is worth some apprehension. It looks thin enough that I'd also be concerned it may bounce and flex hitting your wife from behind. Personally I think your wife wearing a backpack is a better idea.

  6. #5
    Senior Member grewen's Avatar
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    the tail end of the TW is the weak point of the bike. any leverage you apply by hanging bags over the back end, will cause sub frame damage. quite a few posts on "thee old sub frame" problems. i think you might all ready be testing the sub frame by having the rear seat and your passenger's weight on it. according to yamaha, the rear sub frame is only rated for 7 lbs
    Last edited by grewen; 03-29-2018 at 11:04 AM.
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    Greg

    2019 honda cb500x
    2018 honda grom
    2018 suzuki dr200

  7. #6
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    There’s some debate over just what constitutes the “sub frame” – if you suggest that it can only take 7lbs, then you better have a pretty light pillion

    If you concentrate the weight loading on the pillion seat position, you should be good for 150 lbs or so – if you take it to the edge (the apparent luggage space platform), then yes, the 7lb rule applies

    The issue here is that that the pillion position is over what is arguably the “main frame”, while the seat seems to attach to something considerably more flimsy – but once attached, the seat transfers the weight onto the main frame, and is only held in place via the “sub frame” – vertical forces

    The confusion seems to stem from where most racks attach to, which is the cross member, which rather encourages such behaviour by having several holes attracting additional bolts. This cross member is only there to hold the seat in place, and to make sure the seat doesn’t fall off, and thus makes sure the vertical forces on the seat go onto the outside “tubes”

    The outside tubes can take the weight of a person (vertically) – the inner cross members are a token gesture to hold the seat in position – and ignoring this simple engineering fact is what gets most people into trouble

    I would suggest to the OP that by securing the sissy bar to the outside round bar with a system of clamps could be more sensible, but the leverage of a sissy bar may yet prove “problematic” ….
    Smitty Blackstone likes this.
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  8. #7
    Senior Member excalibur's Avatar
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    I see in your signature that you also have a very nice, newer model Harley Davidson..

    I have one also. a 2017 Softail slim with the 110 C.I.

    I think H/D's in particular, can be made to look good if the owner prefers, the addion of a sissy bar on the back for passsanger safety and riding comfort, while carrying a bit of cargo if need be behind the sissy bar in the old Captain America fashion. ( even though on FLSS I ride, I still prefer doing it solo with simply a set of throw over leather bags tied to a small fender rack. ).

    I doubt that I would ever go that " sissy bar" route on my TW for a couple reasons, The first would be safety, and I kind of take pride in having my TW look like what it is... which IMO, is a "safe", rather underpowered, and fairly well designed bike to explore the backroads and trails on..

    I have a 900 cc Triumph America, which I have set up as a distance "road bike", with a short back rest, luggage rack, highway pegs, crash bar, saddlebags, windshield, and seat designed for safe two up riding, as my "pavement bike". I can include camping gear if prefered, and a passanger on the back of that bike when I while enjoying that type of a ride. ( Which IMO, my TW can't safely do 2 up.

    Perhaps a larger Dual Sport model may be able to pull that off safely though should you prefer a somewhat larger model for the" two up " riding with your gear ?

    Just $.02 from an old guy who is probaby once again way out in "Right Field" with my thoughts and notions

    Gene aka:excalibur
    Last edited by excalibur; 03-29-2018 at 11:26 PM.
    2010 TW 200 Dual Sport
    2017 Harley Softail Slim w/110 Cubic Inch Screamin' Eagle engine
    2005 Yamaha 450 Kodiak 4x4 Quad

  9. #8
    Senior Member grewen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Purple View Post
    There’s some debate over just what constitutes the “sub frame” — if you suggest that it can only take 7lbs, then you better have a pretty light pillion

    If you concentrate the weight loading on the pillion seat position, you should be good for 150 lbs or so — if you take it to the edge (the apparent luggage space platform), then yes, the 7lb rule applies

    The issue here is that that the pillion position is over what is arguably the “main frame”, while the seat seems to attach to something considerably more flimsy — but once attached, the seat transfers the weight onto the main frame, and is only held in place via the “sub frame” — vertical forces

    The confusion seems to stem from where most racks attach to, which is the cross member, which rather encourages such behaviour by having several holes attracting additional bolts. This cross member is only there to hold the seat in place, and to make sure the seat doesn’t fall off, and thus makes sure the vertical forces on the seat go onto the outside “tubes”

    The outside tubes can take the weight of a person (vertically) — the inner cross members are a token gesture to hold the seat in position — and ignoring this simple engineering fact is what gets most people into trouble

    I would suggest to the OP that by securing the sissy bar to the outside round bar with a system of clamps could be more sensible, but the leverage of a sissy bar may yet prove “problematic” ….
    well Purple, if you were to look at the picture of his bike you would see the extra passenger seat is way back and 1/2 sitting on the sub frame and in the picture you can see the rack is basicaly supported on the turn signal brackets, meaning there is going to be way more than 7 pounds on the spot that is only designed for.... nothing

    and there is no debate on what is the sub frame....it is the flimsy piece of crap that yamaha scabbed on to the rear of the frame.....it is the piece that we all have been having problems with anytime you carry any more than a 6 pack on it
    Last edited by grewen; 03-29-2018 at 04:14 PM.
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    Greg

    2019 honda cb500x
    2018 honda grom
    2018 suzuki dr200

  10. #9
    Member brandonjohnson33's Avatar
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    The seat is half on the rack but only to attach it to something. My wife sits on the front part of the eat which is over the original seat. We have ridden 4500 miles together with no problem. The sissy bar is attached with pipe clamps for easy removal when I ride off road. I wouldn’t ride it off ride with the sissy bar on for reasons that others have mentioned.
    grewen and Smitty Blackstone like this.
    John 15:13
    Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

    If this verse is true (and it is) then what does it say about Christ’s love? He died for us not when we were His friends but when we were His enemies.

    2015 TW200
    2009 Harley Fat Boy

  11. #10
    Member brandonjohnson33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Woman View Post
    If you plan to tie anything that high I suggest it be the lightest weight items as it will affect your center of gravity. I also agree that anything that can injure you in an accident is worth some apprehension. It looks thin enough that I'd also be concerned it may bounce and flex hitting your wife from behind. Personally I think your wife wearing a backpack is a better idea.



    What you see in the picture is just a model to see what it would look like. I’m using 1/2 solid rebar.
    John 15:13
    Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

    If this verse is true (and it is) then what does it say about Christ’s love? He died for us not when we were His friends but when we were His enemies.

    2015 TW200
    2009 Harley Fat Boy

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