TW200 Tear Down Advice
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  1. #1
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
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    Hi all,



    So, this weekend I will probably start a complete tear down of my TW200. I am not taking apart the motor at all, just disassembling the bike so I can get the frame and other parts powder-coated. I have a fair amount of experience with car and truck mechanics, but I have never pulled a motorcycle apart. I expect things to go smooth and easy, however I wanted to check with the pros on here and ask if there are any particular steps I should pay close attention to. I'm thinking stuff like the brake lines, the forks, etc. Also, in doing this, are there going to be parts that need replacing? Like seals or anything? I am going to paint/powdercoat the wheels and as many other shiny parts as I can.



    I plan to take step by step photos, as usual, so I can reassemble the bike without issue, but any tips or pointers would be excellent.



    Thanks - Bart

  2. #2
    Junior Member BlueWRX's Avatar
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    I'm on the other side of the process right now (reassembly) and if you take some good notes, keep things organized and take lots of pictures you should have no problem with this bike. TW's are very simple motorcycles. As far as needing to replace anything there isn't much during the process that can't be reused. Just a couple things to watch:



    - Steering Head: When you get this apart balls from the bearings may fall out. I personally didn't care because I plan to swap to an ABR roller bearing kit.



    - Swing Arm: There are bushings inside the swing arm pivot that can easily be lost or damaged. The rubber portions may get destroyed if you try to pull them out for powder coating.



    - Air Box: Easiest to pull it out when the sub-frame and swingarm are removed.



    - Engine: Typical replacement parts as needed (gaskets on the intake and exhaust side as required) Also, if you plan on changing the front sprocket you will need a new left side engine cover gasket. For reasons I can't explain yamaha decided not to have a separate cover for the sprocket.



    If you are going to rebuild the front forks you may want to loosen the top bolt while they are still clamped in the triple tree.



    Good luck with your project!

  3. #3
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
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    Thanks for the quick reply.



    So, for the front forks, do I really need to "rebuild" them as you say? Mike bike is a 2009 with low miles, everything is working fine as it should. I do want to get the folk tubes powdercoated, so I guess I might need to do this anyhow? Can you elaborate a little on the forks?



    As for the swingarm bushings, are you saying these are not meant to come out? Or are you saying they are easy to destroy when removing so I will likely have to replace them?



    Thanks again,



    Bart

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  5. #4
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Most good powdercoaters will plug the threaded holes in the frame before powdercoating, but make sure yours does. Reassembly can become a real pain if you have to chase out all the holes.



    IMO the engine is best removed first, with the bike still up on its wheels. Pull the swingarm mounting bolt out just far enough to clear the rear mount, then stick a punch, bolt or drift pin in the oter side to hold the swingarm up. Slip the engine out, then pull the swingarm, shock and rear weel as a complete assembly.



    My advice on the wiring is to disconnect the harness from the headlight and work your way back to the side compartment. Leave evrtything attached on the airbox end, then pull the entire airbox and harness after the swingarm is off as WRX has said.



    The front end can be pulled as a complete assembly by removing the top clamp and slipping the triple tree out of the neck. I wrap the lower bearing area in Saran wrap to (hopefully) catch the lower ball bearings. Lay a towel under the front end to keep the ones you miss (also hopefully) from bouncing into the nether reaches of your work area.



    Anyway this is how I strip them for frame work. It allows you to get the frame and swingarm off to the powdercoaters quickly and deal with each subassembly individually without a ton of individual parts scattered all over the place. Keeping track of all the nuts and bolts alone will cross your eyes if you get too many things disassembled at once.



    The fork lowers are easier to remove when the main tubes are still clamoed in the triples..



    The swingarm bushings can be tough to remove without messing them up. They're made of some sort of phenolic resin, so basically treat them as a soft, brittle plastic. The inners have to be removed by whatever method you can devise. I've had fair luck with prayer and a bluntfaced punch inserted from outside and just catching the end of the bushing. Go easy and use a lot of penetrant.



    The outers are easier.I remove them from the inside, out. I have bushing tools but you can accomplish the job by fiinding a socket the exact size of the O.D. of the bearing. Insert the socket BOTOMM FIRST against the back of the bushing, then isert a socket extension from the far side of the swingarm into the mouth of the socket. Tap gently and with luck they'll come out in one piece. Someimes the bushings will come out easily if the bike has been properly geased in its past life. YMMV.



    Don't let your powdercoater paint the inside of the pivot tube as that will make your next bushing insertion/removal even more difficult. I also remove all the factory paint from the inside of the pivot tube down to bare metal. The pivot is greased through the zerks so they'll never rust.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  6. #5
    Senior Member RisingSun's Avatar
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    Well alot of people grind off the tabs that have no use anymore on the frame when they want to make a street tracker out of it before powdercoating.

  7. #6
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RisingSun
    Well alot of people grind off the tabs that have no use anymore on the frame when they want to make a street tracker out of it before powdercoating.


    Yes, I will be cutting off mounting points and tabs that I do not need. This weekend, my plan is to do a test fit of all the parts, mark which tabs need to come off, then tear the bike down to the frame and make a pile for the powdercoater.



    Bart

  8. #7
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizrdbrth View Post
    Most good powdercoaters will plug the threaded holes in the frame before powdercoating, but..SNIP... never rust.


    Awesome! Thanks for the tips. This is exactly the info I need!



    Bart

  9. #8
    Senior Member macbig2k1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWRX View Post
    ... For reasons I can't explain yamaha decided not to have a separate cover for the sprocket. ...
    I can tell you, why they didn't made a separate sprocket cover.



    The long transmission axle needs a stable mounting. The bearing inside from the generator cover is this fixing point for more stability. But this bearing needs always a good lubrication.

    The oil comes from a oil line, which is inside from the transmission axle.

    But this lubrication point also needs a outlet. And this "outlet oil line" inside from the connection/bar between the sprocket cover part and generator cover part of the complete engine side cover.







    A recommendation for the front forks:

    Change the fork springs!!!!!!!

    The original springs are much too soft.

    You should change to some better progressive springs from "Wirth" (quality made in Germany, not direct made for the TW, but these springs are fantastic, I love it) or HyperPro.



    Sebastian

    Germany

  10. #9
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macbig2k1 View Post
    A recommendation for the front forks:

    Change the fork springs!!!!!!!

    The original springs are much too soft.

    You should change to some better progressive springs from "Wirth" (quality made in Germany, not direct made for the TW, but these springs are fantastic, I love it) or HyperPro.



    Sebastian

    Germany


    Cool! When I get to that part, I will ask you for the details!!



    Bart

  11. #10
    Senior Member nfpgasmask's Avatar
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    OK, I am almost ready to pull the motor out. What is the easiest way to get the carb out? The manual says both side covers need to come off, but it doesn't look like that needs to happen to me. Also, the throttle plate, any advice taking that off? I don't want to screw it up.



    Thanks- Bart

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