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  1. #21
    Senior Member Darth's Avatar
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    ++1 on Seat Concepts seat.
    Go to their website to see variations/options.
    Smitty Blackstone likes this.
    “It’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than a fast bike slow”.

    "The less horsepower a motorcycle has, the more it can teach you.” - Ben Bostrom

    And though a mountain may rise up and smack the livin' shit outta me,
    and wad up my bike somethin' awful...
    Still, I rise!
    (With apologies to Maya Angelou)

    Humans: simultaneously capable of such genius and such douchebaggery!

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  2. #22
    Senior Member Michael Bryce Winnick's Avatar
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    Double takes are the best mirrors in the world. Nobody should buy any mirrors other than the double take mirrors. Everyone with a TW should put double take mirrors on their bike. They are made in the U.S.A.. They are guaranteed for life. They have more adjustability and overall extension than any other mirrors. The next mod that you have to make is a 3/4 inch copper elbow painted flat black off of your exhaust. One side street end. Press fit it on. The scavenging effect of the exhaust will be the difference between jumping the school bus while smoking a cigarette and flashing a peace sign or not being able to cut it. Front tire-Michelin T-63. Very manly. Do not worry about the directional arrow. The seat is a matter of interpretation. If you buy a used one, get an affidavit from the rider that he/she wore pants almost everytime they road. I am a huge fan of the mad dog pad. I have had a few rides from Michigan to Wisconsin and the difference to me was notable. A guy on this site gave it to me for the cost of shipping...thank you again. It raises the seat height a bit. I am 5'6 with a 30 inch inseam and it is nothing. It also puts a rugged look on a mean bike. Hot Hands is the perfect heated grip to add a luxurious touch to this bad boy and no strain to your electrical. The best mod you can make to this bike is get rid of your girly tank and get a Clarke Racing tank. No scratches. No dents. Just 4.2 gallons and range of TW goodness.
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  3. #23
    RDW
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    Senior Member RDW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TW-Brian View Post
    Welcome to the forum BigBlake!

    I would suggest removing the end cap on the muffler (that is, if you are able get it off!). Use a JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) screwdriver, or preferably a hand impact driver with a JIS bit. Do not try to use a standard Philips screwdriver!

    If you are able to get this end cap off, use a generous amount of anti-seize on both the cap and the screw when you replace it. These end caps are notoriously difficult to remove after just a few years of heat cycling, rain, mud, rust, etc.

    You and/or the next owner of this bike will appreciate this effort if this end cap needs to come off sometime in the future.

    Brian
    Good suggestion. Another option is to go one step further and replaced the Phillips head with a hex head bolt, Then enlarged the access hole so that a socket can be used to install or remove the bolt.
    2013 TW200---2007 XT225---2014 CB500X

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  5. #24
    Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    IMHO the MadDog seat cover is a poor attempt at improving an otherwise uncomfortable stock seat. I tried one and couldn't wait to give it away, feeling it was ugly and actually making things worse comfort wise for me.
    A moderately expensive but excellent option is the Seat Concepts foam plus cover kit. Available directly from Seat Concepts, or at a discount from Forum member PlacerLoad, these kits can come with a denser foam likely better for your size. Otherwise custom seat foam and covers can be made but can get pricey.
    I saw a vid of a guy installing that kit, looks a little wider and about 1/2in taller from what he was saying during the install.

    Since I already have the mad dog, I’ll try it out, and if it ends suckin, I got another option! Thanks!
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  6. #25
    Senior Member Tinybear's Avatar
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    My honest opinion is the only thing you should invest in a new bike is fuel. Get to know the machine and see what YOU feel you want to Improve and then come see what your options are for those improvements.

    I have done most of the common upgrades to my TW and am very pleased with the results. But it was done in stages. I rode it stock and replaced some things I felt it needed. Rode it that way and replaced what again I felt it’s next weakest point and sooo on.........

    Today it’s setup to be a great trail exploration bike that can function as a commuter when I so wish. But in all reality it was actually a better street bike before I did any work to it (which for me is fine as I have a dedicated street bike). But out in the bush it gotten me places I don’t think I would have attempted in stock trim.
    2017 Suzuki V-Strom 650 XT

    2010 Yamaha TW200

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    2003 Suzuki Ozark 250

  7. #26
    Junior Member mc14850's Avatar
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    Blake, I just picked up a 2014 a week ago, and after a bunch of reading and a bit of consultation with the experts around here I ordered a set of ProCycle 70 kg front springs and a red 19.0 kg/mm rear spring (via Fred). At 275 and 6'2", the stock springs felt soft from my first rides around the yard, I was bottoming out over minor bumps and getting a lot of dive under braking. I slapped the fork springs in this morning, easy job, and the front end os transformed. Quite stiff now, and feels right for a guy my size who likes a little stiffer fork. Any lighter than me and it the 70 kg might be too stiff for some tastes, but I always ran a fairly stiff fork on my mountain bikes because I don't like a mushy front end and I don't do a lot of jumping. The red 19.0 kg/mm will go on tomorrow. I chose them over a four wheeler shock for two reasons, I figure as a noob I might as well keep things simple until I get used to the TW, and I didn't want to be messing with the steering geometry if I ended up with a different length shock/spring combo.
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  8. #27
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
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    Front tire is a must...I love my shinko 241 which is ideal for dual sporting.
    Sturdy hand guards are a must for off road. Saves hands and levers from tree and ground impact.
    An X or O ring chain will last you much longer and in turn make your sprockets last longer too.
    Ricochet skid plate is a great addition if you ride in rough rocky terrain.

    Oh yeah and 2-4 extra teeth on the back sprocket will cost you some top speed but give you more power and acceleration.
    Last edited by Trail Woman; 04-07-2019 at 04:44 PM.
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  9. #28
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    What, you mean an extended swing arm, 225cc XT motor with kickstarter, ATV tire out back, trials tire up front ,and a pumper carb with a rubber chicken aren't really necessary?
    Smitty Blackstone likes this.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
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  10. #29
    Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mc14850 View Post
    Blake, I just picked up a 2014 a week ago, and after a bunch of reading and a bit of consultation with the experts around here I ordered a set of ProCycle 70 kg front springs and a red 19.0 kg/mm rear spring (via Fred). At 275 and 6'2", the stock springs felt soft from my first rides around the yard, I was bottoming out over minor bumps and getting a lot of dive under braking. I slapped the fork springs in this morning, easy job, and the front end os transformed. Quite stiff now, and feels right for a guy my size who likes a little stiffer fork. Any lighter than me and it the 70 kg might be too stiff for some tastes, but I always ran a fairly stiff fork on my mountain bikes because I don't like a mushy front end and I don't do a lot of jumping. The red 19.0 kg/mm will go on tomorrow. I chose them over a four wheeler shock for two reasons, I figure as a noob I might as well keep things simple until I get used to the TW, and I didn't want to be messing with the steering geometry if I ended up with a different length shock/spring combo.
    MC, let me know how that rear spring feels, I’m with you and keeping stuff simple. I haven’t pulled the trigger on the banshee shock yet, and if I can keep the bike as close to the original design as I can, that’s preferable 🙂
    Smitty Blackstone likes this.

  11. #30
    Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinybear View Post
    My honest opinion is the only thing you should invest in a new bike is fuel. Get to know the machine and see what YOU feel you want to Improve and then come see what your options are for those improvements.

    I have done most of the common upgrades to my TW and am very pleased with the results. But it was done in stages. I rode it stock and replaced some things I felt it needed. Rode it that way and replaced what again I felt it’s next weakest point and sooo on.........

    Today it’s setup to be a great trail exploration bike that can function as a commuter when I so wish. But in all reality it was actually a better street bike before I did any work to it (which for me is fine as I have a dedicated street bike). But out in the bush it gotten me places I don’t think I would have attempted in stock trim.
    Before assumptions are made, I’m not planning on taking a perfectly good bike and turning it into a project lol, my girflfriend would probably end me if I start any new project anyways.

    Anyone who invests in toys and tools should be obliged to do some research on function and failures before that stuff happens. I’m just using everyone’s experience to expedite the search for the best pieces and parts to use for changes I’m already considering or those that should be considered to either increase enjoyment, life, or enhance the safety of the TW I just bought.

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