Recommended Changes for New TW?
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Thread: Recommended Changes for New TW?

  1. #1
    Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Hi everyone, new member and new owner of a 2019 TW. After reading through a lot of forum posts and not wanting to turn a perfectly good stock bike into a major project, are there any immediate changes that you experienced gentlemen or ladies make on a new TW? Any pieces or parts on a factory TW that should be replaced that might increase the longevity or or overall enjoyment of the bike when riding?

    I've been riding dirt bikes for a couple seasons, but still a relatively novice rider, all expert advice and criticism is welcome [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.tw200forum.com/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/IMG]
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    Last edited by TWBigBlake; 04-05-2019 at 09:29 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sthrnromr's Avatar
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    Here is my two cents in order of importance:

    First:
    - Invest in good/safe/comfortable riding gear (especially helmets and boots first)
    - Larger foot pegs / shifter ( for safety and comfort )
    - Alternate front tire ( safety )
    - Bar risers (if needed for your height and riding preference)

    Options based on riding style/area/preference:

    - Rear rack (Cyclerack or Manrack)
    - Skid Plate ( Ricochet if you ride enough off-road )
    - Alternate lighting (if riding often at night)
    - New chain (O or X ring)
    - Suspension front/rear springs (if you need it based on riding and weight )
    - Windscreen ( if you need/want it )
    - Fuel capacity ( if you really need it)


    Any questions just ask. Amazing group of helpful, experienced riders here.
    admiral, Miaugi, Darth and 8 others like this.
    2010 TW200 - The Goat
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  3. #3
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    These are the first changes I made making my riding experience more pleasurable. Problem is, I didn't know about the forum for 5 years after buying my 2005 and I rode it stock.

    Depending on how much you ride off-road you might want the following possible changes:

    Wider Footpegs - not expensive (so you can stand when riding off-road better without your feet slipping off)
    2" bar risers - not expensive (posture improvement)
    Better front tire (Shinko SR241 as an example but not the only one) $50 ish. (won't wash out nearly as bad as the stock front tire). The stock front tire is not-so-affectionately know as the "Death Wing". The knobbies don't grip like you want. The stock front tire is just fine on pavement though.
    Hidden Content A ride in the woods helps me relax and release tension. The fact I'm dragging a body should be entirely irrelevant?

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  5. #4
    Junior Member ixel's Avatar
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    I think this is a great list to start building! Certainly you should ride it for awhile and see what you personally want or how you want to ride it.

    That being said, I'm a new rider myself but here are some things I noticed that people usually change:
    1) The Front Tire - The front Trailwing stock tire is street-leaning and many people find them slippery on pavement, so anyone who rides more mixed-use and definitely people who do more off-roading usually swap it out. A Shinko SR241 is a pretty common replacement.
    2) The Mirrors - The stock mirrors don't seem to do much for some people, especially taller riders. I've seen the Doubletake and Emgo mirrors recommended, but you can put anything with a 10mm Yamaha compatible thread on there (reversed right thread).
    3) The Chain - Not a necessary swap on a new bike, but an O-ring or X-ring chain to replace stock is a popular aftermarket purchase.

  6. #5
    Senior Member TW-Brian's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum BigBlake!

    I would suggest removing the end cap on the muffler (that is, if you are able get it off!). Use a JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) screwdriver, or preferably a hand impact driver with a JIS bit. Do not try to use a standard Philips screwdriver!

    If you are able to get this end cap off, use a generous amount of anti-seize on both the cap and the screw when you replace it. These end caps are notoriously difficult to remove after just a few years of heat cycling, rain, mud, rust, etc.

    You and/or the next owner of this bike will appreciate this effort if this end cap needs to come off sometime in the future.

    Brian

  7. #6
    Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sthrnromr View Post
    Here is my two cents in order of importance:

    First:
    - Invest in good/safe/comfortable riding gear (especially helmets and boots first)
    - Larger foot pegs / shifter ( for safety and comfort )
    - Alternate front tire ( safety )
    - Bar risers (if needed for your height and riding preference)

    Options based on riding style/area/preference:

    - Rear rack (Cyclerack or Manrack)
    - Skid Plate ( Ricochet if you ride enough off-road )
    - Alternate lighting (if riding often at night)
    - New chain (O or X ring)
    - Suspension front/rear springs (if you need it based on riding and weight )
    - Windscreen ( if you need/want it )
    - Fuel capacity ( if you really need it)


    Any questions just ask. Amazing group of helpful, experienced riders here.
    Thanks for the response, protective gear I should be good. I am a larger rider (a true lovechild of the Michelin man and the jolly green giant), 6’2” around 400lbs of raging fury. So if any forum members need help finding gear for bigger riders, I got you fam!

    I was checking out the links provided to the TW procycle page, I was definitely looking at the wider foot-pegs, I’m fairly comfortable with the height and angle of the stock handlebars considering my gorilla arms, do you (or anyone else) have any input on replacing the stock bars for durability?

    I installed the Ferreus rear cargo rack last weekend and bolted on a small pelican case, going to test out some 6” and 8” pipe clamps for two tool tubes to go on the side of the rack (I’m winging it on this one, any advise is super welcome).

    The “death wing” inspires immediate concern lol, I’ll be doing about 50/50 on/off road, I’ll look into scooping up a shinko and see how the ride feels after.

    I’ll also be picking up a banshee rear shock and installing a stiffer coil to address the additional weight.

    Anyone here put in the stiffer front fork spring from the procycle listing? Noticeable difference in handling? Dampening?
    Last edited by TWBigBlake; 04-05-2019 at 10:48 AM.

  8. #7
    Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TW-Brian View Post
    Welcome to the forum BigBlake!

    I would suggest removing the end cap on the muffler (that is, if you are able get it off!). Use a JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) screwdriver, or preferably a hand impact driver with a JIS bit. Do not try to use a standard Philips screwdriver!

    If you are able to get this end cap off, use a generous amount of anti-seize on both the cap and the screw when you replace it. These end caps are notoriously difficult to remove after just a few years of heat cycling, rain, mud, rust, etc.

    You and/or the next owner of this bike will appreciate this effort if this end cap needs to come off sometime in the future.

    Brian
    Here comes the novice I mentioned earlier... what does removing the end cap do? Is it just to free it up in case it needs to be removed later? I haven’t finished reading through the repair manual, so I’m fresh off the boat when it comes to exhaust stuff aside from a swap I did on my KZ550

  9. #8
    Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ixel View Post
    I think this is a great list to start building! Certainly you should ride it for awhile and see what you personally want or how you want to ride it.

    That being said, I'm a new rider myself but here are some things I noticed that people usually change:
    1) The Front Tire - The front Trailwing stock tire is street-leaning and many people find them slippery on pavement, so anyone who rides more mixed-use and definitely people who do more off-roading usually swap it out. A Shinko SR241 is a pretty common replacement.
    2) The Mirrors - The stock mirrors don't seem to do much for some people, especially taller riders. I've seen the Doubletake and Emgo mirrors recommended, but you can put anything with a 10mm Yamaha compatible thread on there (reversed right thread).
    3) The Chain - Not a necessary swap on a new bike, but an O-ring or X-ring chain to replace stock is a popular aftermarket purchase.
    Not to sound too cherry, but are there existing concerns related to stock chain performance?

    Also, if you can picture a Russian circus bear on a child’s bicycle... any thoughts on mirrors that might reach a little wider than stock? Do they make ones that you can mount to the handlebars closer to the outside? The stock ones are just a tiny bit too close to get a good view of vehicles behind me, I read about some that attach to hand guards? Thoughts?

  10. #9
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWBigBlake View Post
    Thanks for the response, protective gear I should be good. I am a larger rider (a true lovechild of the Michelin man and the jolly green giant), 6’2” around 400lbs of raging fury. So if any forum members need help finding gear for bigger riders, I got you fam!

    I was checking out the links provided to the TW procycle page, I was definitely looking at the wider foot-pegs, I’m fairly comfortable with the height and angle of the stock handlebars considering my gorilla arms, do you (or anyone else) have any input on replacing the stock bars for durability?

    I installed the Ferreus rear cargo rack last weekend and bolted on a small pelican case, going to test out some 6” and 8” pipe clamps for two tool tubes to go on the side of the rack (I’m winging it on this one, any advise is super welcome).

    The “death wing” inspires immediate concern lol, I’ll be doing about 50/50 on/off road, I’ll look into scooping up a shinko and see how the ride feels after.

    I’ll also be picking up a banshee rear shock and installing a stiffer coil to address the additional weight.

    Anyone here put in the stiffer front fork spring from the procycle listing? Noticeable difference in handling? Dampening?
    I put the heaviest front and rear springs on my 2015 TW with the stock rear spring. Stiffer and I don't bottom out. 6' 250 lbs.

    Easier to change the rear sprocket than front which requires you to remove the left side cover with possible associated gasket removal issues and pinched wires issue. Try 14/55 in the future. 14/50 is stock.
    Hidden Content A ride in the woods helps me relax and release tension. The fact I'm dragging a body should be entirely irrelevant?

  11. #10
    Senior Member Ski Pro 3's Avatar
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    The stock chain stretches like a rubber band with dirt and water applied. No amount of preventative service or care will matter.
    If you feel your clutch slip, or unhappy with the on/off feel of the clutch play, heavier clutch springs will fix both. I really needed to be able to play the clutch as I have stock gearing on the sprockets and do not want to sacrifice top end speed for low end torque. I don't ride often enough to worry about wearing out the clutch plates, so slipping the piss out of 'em works great for me.

    There are aftermarket RAM mirrors that use the ball/socket design RAM is famous for that work with the TW200, but pricey at $130 a pair. Not only are they long, you can either add more length or change out the extender part for a longer version for not much money. The best part is that they actually are functional, providing a clear rear view instead of a blurred one at speed. They fold in when going off road or crashing. Check out the photos on this Amazon link. A guy takes a baseball bat to them and they hold up. For that alone, I think they are worth the price.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BHVYK3J...v_ov_lig_dp_it
    The bear slayer!

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