Battery solution...jumper wire for the trail!
Close
    
    
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
Like Tree54Likes

Thread: Battery solution...jumper wire for the trail!

  1. #1
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    1,404

    Battery solution...jumper wire for the trail!

    When a month old KLX140g struggles to estart on the trail it's worthy of concern. Why trail bikes are estart only and not MX bikes is beyond me. I think all got it backwards.

    So we got pig tail cables for our batteries to charge and are going to make up a double ended SAE wire to connect the bikes should one of our batteries need a boost in the trail.

    I thought it seemed like a good idea and worth sharing.

    On another note I got a fuel hose with inline pump so I can use my oversize gas tank to help out my fiends on long rides should they run out.
    Last edited by Trail Woman; 07-12-2019 at 01:56 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member TW-Brian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Pleasanton, CA
    Posts
    5,740
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Woman View Post

    So we got pig tail cables for our batteries to charge and are going to make up a double ended SAE wire to connect the bikes should one of our batteries need a boost in the trail.

    I thought it seemed like a good idea and worth sharing.
    That is a good idea, Trail Woman.

    But be aware that while those SAE pigtails are good for charging batteries, they are little light for trying to jump start a dead battery. If they are fused, you will likely blow the fuse and if they are not fused you may melt the insulation and/or actually burn through one of the conductors.

    Be careful!

  3. #3
    Member TW-JMS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Oromocto, New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    67
    I second TW-Brian's concern WRT charging vs boosting. In order to safely boost the second vehs, the jumper "cable" would have to be of the same dia as the existing battery-to-starter cable to prevent melting/fire. A greater dia cable would also prevent excessive voltage loss. Anyway, this is a great idea for charging a dead battery on a second bike, I'd just hate to see something horrible happen to your terrific machine.
    grewen and Trail Woman like this.
    2014 TW. UBIQUE!

  4. Remove Advertisements
    TW200Forum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member jbfla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    FL. GA, NC
    Posts
    2,399
    Add a third to TW-Brian's advice. The current to start a dead battery is much more than to charge one.

    I have seen photos of fried (burned) thin charging cables used to jump start.

    An alternative is to have one of the small lithium-ion jumper batteries....that what I have in my tail bag.

    The jumper battery packs are not much larger than a 3x5 index card. The cables and clamps are bigger than the jumper battery.

    As a bonus, it can charge your phone. I used mine to jump start my truck.

    Lots of different brands, and sizes, and prices. The smallest are suitable for motorcycles.

    Not recommending any particular one: an example:

    https://www.amazon.com/Arteck-Extern...MZ7FPGWD0ZFSNR

    Jb
    Last edited by jbfla; 07-13-2019 at 10:19 AM.
    rurlndum, Trail Woman and ejfranz like this.
    2018 Triumph Street Twin..............2016 CB500F
    2014 XT250 ..................................2008 H-D Softail Deluxe
    2008 SV 650..................................2007 DR 650..

  6. #5
    Senior Member jbfla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    FL. GA, NC
    Posts
    2,399
    Found a photo of my mini jump start battery:



    I don't carry the charger with me, to save space.

    The battery is good for multiple starts.

    The on/off switch is on the side. It's nearly invisible, but necessary to turn the unit on...

    This jumper battery is rated for 150 amps continuous or 300 amps peak.

    jb
    Last edited by jbfla; 07-13-2019 at 10:17 AM.
    Trail Woman likes this.
    2018 Triumph Street Twin..............2016 CB500F
    2014 XT250 ..................................2008 H-D Softail Deluxe
    2008 SV 650..................................2007 DR 650..

  7. #6
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Turtle Wrangling the Sierras
    Posts
    18,801
    The voice of experience applauds TrailWoman's idea for use in an emergency.
    I have used very thin 18 gauge wire to trickle, then jump start a 4 litre V-6 from my TW. Sure the wires can get hot and one needs to carefully monitor things but a little melted insulation sure beats abandoning a discharged vehicle out of fear of what may happen. You gotta do what you gotta do.you-gotta-do-what-you-gotta-do-35077851.png
    As George Patton once said "Take not council of your fears".
    One can be amazed at how far one can push things past stated safety margins when necessity arrises.
    While I would not recommend, nor use, those flat 2-pole connectors for sustained high current loads I would not hesitate to try it if the alternative was uglier like waiting hours while sending riding partner out to charge battery or return with proper jumper cables, or get hurt trying to push/pull bike ( Remember Biker-Josh and his badly broken ankle from a pull-start attempt?).

    EDIT: This assumes one is remote which favors a riskier approach to self rescue. Thicker wire can also be cannibalized from other bike systems like turn signals, horn, and other lighting. Personally I think the time to re-wire a lighting group once back home is less than it takes to hike 20 miles or so seeking help.
    Last edited by Fred; 07-13-2019 at 10:52 AM.
    Trail Woman, SanDue and Ken like this.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
    Hidden Content All Things Considered I’ld Rather Be Motorcycling

  8. #7
    Senior Member TW-Brian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Pleasanton, CA
    Posts
    5,740
    While I don't usually ride alone in the desolation wilderness areas as Fred does, I do see the need to take simple easy steps to be prepared in case of unexpected emergencies. A few feet of solid copper wire could prove to be a lifesaver, or at least save you from a long hike. This could be wrapped around a fork tube between the upper and lower triple clamps, or out of the way on the frame underneath the seat. Aside from being used for electrical purposes it could also be used to secure a loose muffler, a broken Cyclerack, or even to tie a tire to the rim to allow you limp home with a flat. Throw in a handful of steel wool and you've got a great fire-starter.

    I just tossed this coil into my rear Pelican case.

    IMG_2066[1].jpg

  9. #8
    Senior Member SportsterDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Southern Nevada
    Posts
    1,077
    First, I applaude Trail Woman for her interest in preparedness, as geography may not allow a push start.

    Second, already a lot of good advice on cable size, but the size needs to increase with length to minimize voltage drop...not ignoring Fred's comments about making do.

    Third, I will share my series of errors 4 decades ago, for your evaluation:
    Circa late seventies, on a 1976 MOPAR family vehicle I had 76-81, I went to the Northridge Fashion Center Mall and parked in the structure later collapsed by the 94 quake.
    Coming back from Sears (likely a tool purchase), the 318 would not crank and I did not have a voltmeter with me (mistake #1)
    Got out medium duty jumper cables (mistake #2) and got a jump, without success.
    Figured it was bad starter (mistake #3) and got one delivered from Granada Hills from an independent auto parts where I had an account when I was doing business as Cycle Tuning Unlimited.
    Changed starter in parking structure (ample tools in vehicle).
    Battery was the first supposed no service type from JC Penny (mistake #4 could be debated)

    No start

    Got jump with heavy duty cables (wife came with truck???) and it started immediately.

    Exchanged battery (within warranty) at Penneys.

    You are welcome to benefit from my mistakes!

    Car and truck now have voltmeter and heavy gauge jumpers.
    Trail Woman, Ken and jbfla like this.
    2014 Honda CB1100
    2018 Yamaha XT250
    2016 Moto Guzzi V7 II
    2017 Yamaha TW200
    2012 Triumph Bonneville
    2002 H-D Sportster 1200 Sport
    2003 H-D Sportster 883
    1976 Honda CB750F
    1975 Honda CB360
    1970 Yamaha CT1
    1972 Yamaha CT2
    1972 Yamaha AT2/CT2
    1970 Honda SL350
    1970 Honda CL350
    1967 Honda CL160
    1967 Honda CB160
    1962 Honda CA110

  10. #9
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    1,404
    Thanks for all the feedback. I will certainly take it al into consideration.

    The charge tails have 7amp fuses.

    Maybe a second jumper tail on each battery with heavier gauge wire and connectors?
    Ken likes this.

  11. #10
    Ken
    Ken is offline
    Senior Member Ken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,928
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Woman View Post
    Thanks for all the feedback. I will certainly take it al into consideration.

    The charge tails have 7amp fuses.

    Maybe a second jumper tail on each battery with heavier gauge wire and connectors?
    I made jumper cables out of the pig tail connectors. I had one end plug to the pig tail and the other end has the mini-jumper cable ends. As long as your battery on your MC is not totally dead it usually isn't an issue if you let the running bike run for a while to charge up that low battery before trying to start it. If nothing else it may push start easier with enough juice for the spark. If you jump it from a car or truck have it off so it doesn't blow something on your bike. That is the main reason I made mine with the mini-jumper cables was for jumping from a vehicle if needed. I also use the small cables to go from my charger to my auto batteries if needed. I just have to watch the polarity as flip flopping it on the connectors of the bike verses my charger are reversed. As with all electrical, be careful.
    1993 TW200 just shy of 46,000 miles

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponosred Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •