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Thread: Loose Back Sprocket

  1. #1
    Member Tyler's Avatar
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    Loose Back Sprocket

    This past weekend right before I installed that kicker, I put a real HARD trail ride in. Very sandy trails, hills, whoops and an all around just aggressive ride on the TW. I was keeping up to a '83 XL 250 and a '04 DRZ 400. So when I was pulling the clutch basket off, with the " in gear, foot on brake" method, I noticed some movement in my back sprocket. I checked and all the bolts were loose! I assume it was from that hard ride but to be honest, I'm not sure how long they've been loose. They're tightened back up now.

    Thought I'd share, as it seems to be something worth checking from time to time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member old mad max's Avatar
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    If you bend the tabs on the nuts correctly it should keep it tight for a looooooooooooooooooooooooooong time?????????? OMM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member docjekyll2002's Avatar
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    I have a feeling that the next time i replace the rear sprocket, all the tabs will break. Should i buy some replacements on ebay or not bother?

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    Super Moderator littletommy's Avatar
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    Buy a replacement. You need that secondary safety.
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    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    The tabs are designed for two changes. Some of the bent tabs can be re used if they don't crack or brake on flattening them.

    A loose rear sprocket is your first indicator that you are not doing a pre ride safety check which is your first and very best defense against a catastrophic failure on the road. I have found many loose screws, nuts and bolts when doing my pre flight inspections and vibration is the cause.

    GaryL
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  7. #6
    Senior Member Dryden-Tdub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryL View Post
    The tabs are designed for two changes. Some of the bent tabs can be re used if they don't crack or brake on flattening them.

    A loose rear sprocket is your first indicator that you are not doing a pre ride safety check which is your first and very best defense against a catastrophic failure on the road. I have found many loose screws, nuts and bolts when doing my pre flight inspections and vibration is the cause.

    GaryL
    Care to expound on that Gary? Since I am new to this model it would be nice to know of any particular nuts and bolts that may be repeat offenders. Thank you in advance


    Tom

  8. #7
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dryden-Tdub View Post
    Care to expound on that Gary? Since I am new to this model it would be nice to know of any particular nuts and bolts that may be repeat offenders. Thank you in advance


    Tom
    Sure Tom. The TW is a single cylinder engine that revs quite high and has an inherent vibration factor as any single will. I spend probably 5 minutes checking the bike before I ever start it up.

    Make sure the levers and controls on the handle bars are all tight and the pivot bolts in the levers have not lost the nuts on the under side. Check both the front and rear axle bolts and nuts and the cotter pins. Check the chain and master link for adjustment and lubrication. Check the chain guard and rear sprocket bolts for any loose or missing bolts. Check the foot pegs for loose bolts and also the shifter. The air box side cover has two exposed screws that like to rattle out. Check all lights and blinkers for proper function and look for leaks around the carb, engine and under the bike where it was parked, check the oil level and if you have a front disc check the fluid reservoir. Check tire pressure and inspect tires for nails or other problems such as a dented rim or a weather crack or bubble. Check to be sure the engine bolts are tight, many have found them backed out under the seat or loose on the front down tube.

    Before I leave my driveway I check the brakes.

    I rode a buddies TW when I first learned about them and when we pulled in to a Yamaha dealer I went to down shift only to find the shift lever was gone. Any of these things can cause a catastrophic failure at 50-60 MPH so it is always in your best interest to be on top of your game for your own safety. Throwing a chain while cruising at speed can be deadly and also very expensive. While on a trail ride we took a smoke brake and I noticed my buddies front axle had lost the nut and was backed out about an inch, another inch and his front wheel would have fallen off. He forgot to tighten the nut and install the cotter pin. The first rule in riding is to check your ride!

    GaryL
    Dryden-Tdub and dette like this.
    Be Decisive! Right or Wrong just make a decision. ​ The road of life is paved with flat squirrels that couldn't make a decision.

    Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
    If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    1987 Yamaha BW350 Big Wheel
    2017 Snowdog Track sled tow motor for ice fishing
    Kubota BX2370 Subcompact tractor with snow blower
    Wilderness System Ride 115 fishing Kayaks

  9. #8
    Senior Member Dryden-Tdub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryL View Post
    Sure Tom. The TW is a single cylinder engine that revs quite high and has an inherent vibration factor as any single will. I spend probably 5 minutes checking the bike before I ever start it up.

    Make sure the levers and controls on the handle bars are all tight and the pivot bolts in the levers have not lost the nuts on the under side. Check both the front and rear axle bolts and nuts and the cotter pins. Check the chain and master link for adjustment and lubrication. Check the chain guard and rear sprocket bolts for any loose or missing bolts. Check the foot pegs for loose bolts and also the shifter. The air box side cover has two exposed screws that like to rattle out. Check all lights and blinkers for proper function and look for leaks around the carb, engine and under the bike where it was parked, check the oil level and if you have a front disc check the fluid reservoir. Check tire pressure and inspect tires for nails or other problems such as a dented rim or a weather crack or bubble. Check to be sure the engine bolts are tight, many have found them backed out under the seat or loose on the front down tube.

    Before I leave my driveway I check the brakes.

    I rode a buddies TW when I first learned about them and when we pulled in to a Yamaha dealer I went to down shift only to find the shift lever was gone. Any of these things can cause a catastrophic failure at 50-60 MPH so it is always in your best interest to be on top of your game for your own safety. Throwing a chain while cruising at speed can be deadly and also very expensive. While on a trail ride we took a smoke brake and I noticed my buddies front axle had lost the nut and was backed out about an inch, another inch and his front wheel would have fallen off. He forgot to tighten the nut and install the cotter pin. The first rule in riding is to check your ride!

    GaryL
    It is this type of response that makes this forum special! Thank you. Incredibly thorough as well. I have been really good about checking the big things before every ride "chain, axles, sprocket, etc" I can honestly say that I would never have thought to check the pivot bolts or the shifter though. I am going to give everything a good going over after my bike returns from its mandatory service by Yamaha. I have read on this forum the engine mounts have a tendency to loosen? I know this bike can be buzzy since I have logged 750 miles in a bit over a month and that has just been farting around after work and on weekends. This thing is addictive! Thank you once again.


    Tom

  10. #9
    Member Tyler's Avatar
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    I'm definitely going to give my bike a thorough bolt tightening check this evening.

    I usually ride quite a bit of highway kilometers, around 100kph, to and from the trails. Like mentioned above, this bike vibrates alot at that speed. So much that the mirros are basically useless!

  11. #10
    Mel
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    Senior Member Mel's Avatar
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    I like to do most of the bike inspection after a ride, because I will have a feel for anything that might have changed or reminded me to inspect. If I wait for the next ride, I may forget about something that should have been inspected. I also feel after a ride is when you are most familiar with the bike. I also like to push the bike forward and backward in gear to check chain and drive train looseness.
    Mel
    GaryL likes this.

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