Is it time to replace my rear drum parts?
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Thread: Is it time to replace my rear drum parts?

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    Senior Member docjekyll2002's Avatar
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    Is it time to replace my rear drum parts?

    After using the rear brake aggressively for the oast few months, MY rear drum squeals noticeably more now when i'm coming to a stop. Should i replace the rear drum parts now? What parts should i order on Partzilla? I see two different drum kits but the prices are vastly different.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Werloc's Avatar
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    Post a link to that page with parts or what year bike you looking at?

    Squeeking noise is normally caused by a combonation of brake dust, and glazed over shoes and drums. Just take it appart, and lightly sand or scuff the shoes at brake surface and the drums. Also clean it out real good. Grease the cam post/shaft wear it goes through the hub, and the flat sides of cam lobe that opens shoes. Thats all that's needed. You only need to replace shoes if worn. Otherwise, you just wasting money. New parts squeek as well once dusted up and glazed. This is all part of preventive maintnance..... Mine squeeked very loud until I did this when I replaced my sprockets and chain. Water from riding and washing just causes this to happen quicker. Light rust also causes a squeek..... Every 500 to 1,000 when it starts queeking again, I remove rear wheel, inspect, clean, scuff, grease shaft & cam... Good as new again
    Last edited by Werloc; 05-20-2015 at 08:07 AM.
    Bob

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    Senior Member docjekyll2002's Avatar
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    Thanks!

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    Junior Member TiZBaD's Avatar
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    I need to take mine apart too and get all the A.N.F. mud out of there ... I will use waterproof grease on the lever and rear pivot and brake grease on the inside cam . Grease cam lightly because it will attract dirt . U may want to clean & lube your clutch cable .it felt a little sticky.. Got off big mud after work Mon./Tue A.M(I like to ride around muddy for a day or 2)then took off seat ,tank ,plastics , cleaned more mud ,used air filter cleaner and chain cleaner I will take apart swing arm pivots and both axles clean and grease ..

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    Senior Member docjekyll2002's Avatar
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    Just did all that on my rear drum today. Will be doing a test ride soon!

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    Senior Member Werloc's Avatar
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    Cool, how were the shoes? Worn or not?
    Bob

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    Senior Member docjekyll2002's Avatar
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    image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg

    I'm no shoe expert but here's a pic. two things were PITA: 1) the wingnut on the brake rod felt like it welded itself to the rod because the rod had no lubrication on the threads and 2) I didnt have any solid object lifting the bike high enough when i was aligning the wheel, spacer, drum and swingarm with 1 hand and lifting the bike with my other hand. Did a short, slow test ride just to make sure the bike still runs. Will do a rear braking test at moderate speed later to see if my drum cleaning and sanding has removed the squeal.

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    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    More than likely will - as suggested - sand down the pads and blow out the dust - this happens on a regular basis .......
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  10. #9
    Senior Member Werloc's Avatar
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    Doc, I really can't see by that pic. Just make sure the pads aren't worn down to metal, or that there's no metal touching the drum. I didn't really pay attention to how thick it is when I had mine off. Maybe someone here can chime in with that info for ya. IF it still squeels, just get new shoes, nothing else is needed. Also clean those threads on your rod, use a little oil or grease on threads so it's easy to turn. You should be good after that.
    Bob

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    Senior Member docjekyll2002's Avatar
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    When i cleaned the rod and applied grease, the wingnut eventually spun around with little effort. What a difference! In the pic showing the drum, it looks like the shoes are almost 5 mm thick. Doesn't look anywhere close to the metal that the shoes are resting on.

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