Valve Cover Gasket
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  1. #1
    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    Both my valve covers were oozing oil and have been doing so for a while but the last time I checked my valve clearance resulted in an increase. The time had come to fix it.



    I went to the local stealership and I think he said he wanted $9 per gasket -- they are just o-rings -- and I needed two. I walked out. Next I looked on Bikebandit and they wanted $7 each. I went to local hardware stores and found some in the plumbing section but I couldn't find the right size.



    Lastly I went to Ace Seal here in San Jose. They look like a big wholesaler and I figured they probably had a minimum order of $25 or so. I go in the back door, the front door is for employees only, and a lady greets me. I explain I am looking for o-rings and she asks to see the one I have with me. She carefully measures it and asks me what it is for. I say a motorcycle. She returns with 3 different sizes, the size she measured and one size slightly larger and one smaller. I tried the measured size first and it is perfect. She asks "how many would you like?" and I ask back "how much are they?" To my shock she says 21 cents each!!! So I buy four. 92 cents total, including tax! Man, that is a long cry from the $18 for 2 the dealer wanted.



    I checked their website and it says the material used in the o-ring I bought is good to 250 degrees F. Should that be inadequate they also make ones good to 400 degrees F.



    Anyway, that's my story and I am sticking to it.

    Long live the internal combustion engine!

  2. #2
    Member Sozzy1269's Avatar
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    They may be heat resistant, but are they oil resistant? Let us know how they work out.
    2008 TW200 w/ 2" handlebar risers, Ricochet bash plate, KTM front fender lifted, factory rear rack.

    2006 Kawasaki KFX400

    2009 Yamaha Grizzly 350

    2008 Arctic Cat DVX90

    2010 Ford F-150 Supercrew FX4

    2000 Ford F-150 Super cab 4x4

    1966 Ford Mustang GT

  3. #3
    Senior Member Rainman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sozzy1269 View Post
    They may be heat resistant, but are they oil resistant? Let us know how they work out.




    That would be my question too.
    If you can't find it, grind it

    1990 TW200

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  5. #4
    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    Yes, they are made for oil and I quote what is OK to use these particular o-rings for : " Oil, Air, Water, Gasoline, Engine Coolant, Silicone Greases, Hydraulic Fluids, & Alcohols".



    They sell other o-rings for acids, acetone, ketones, steam, silicone oils, o-rings resistant to sunlight and ozone and oxygen, etc.,etc. The young lady specifically asked me if they would be in oil and I said yes. I have no doubt oil will not be the problem.

    Long live the internal combustion engine!

  6. #5
    Senior Member pantera1's Avatar
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    Good job finding a much less expensive source.



    You'll have to give us a long term update in the future.
    2007 FZ1

    1991 TW200

    1972 CB350

    2006 Goldwing

    2008 WR250R

  7. #6
    Senior Member Rainman's Avatar
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    Well, if they are oil proof then thats great. Keep us updated as to how they work.
    If you can't find it, grind it

    1990 TW200

  8. #7
    Senior Member kj7687's Avatar
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    Not to squash your enthusiasm but I'm afraid 250 degrees won't cut it. These bikes can run hot as hell, up to 350 degrees. But maybe if you get the 400 degree rings and they're oil resistant, then you might be onto something.
    KJ, just KJ, ok.


    Current rides:
    2004 GMC Sierra 1500, 1999 Toyota 4Runner

    Past rides: 2015 Yamaha XT 250, 1997 Suzuki DR 200, 2007 Honda Ruckus, 2007 Yamaha TW 200, 2007 Kawasaki Ninja 500, 2009 Kawasaki KLX331S; 1994 GMC Sierra 1500, 1987 Nissan Pathfinder, 1992 Acura Integra, 1986 Honda CRX, 1989 Jeep Cherokee, 1994 Chevrolet Astro Van, 1979 Volkswagen Rabbit, 1984 Jeep Cherokee

  9. #8
    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kj7687 View Post
    Not to squash your enthusiasm but I'm afraid 250 degrees won't cut it. These bikes can run hot as hell, up to 350 degrees. But maybe if you get the 400 degree rings and they're oil resistant, then you might be onto something.


    I was afraid temperature might be the problem that is why I posted the 250 degrees. But, so far so good. 137 miles and 5.5 hours of run time, some of those miles going up hill at 55 to 60 mph for several miles so I am sure the engine got really hot, other times on a trail going slow, and not a hint of oozing or seepage.



    I think the real test will be when it is time to adjust valves again and see whether or not the o-rings are reusable.

    Long live the internal combustion engine!

  10. #9
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    I've been advocating matching up o-rings at an industrial seal place for years. I use Westley Seals in Hurst, Texas. E10 ate the stock rubber out of my CB550 carbs, so I HAD to do something unless I wanted to rebuild the carbs every 3 months. Keep the rings you've got. Next time, go for the higher temp material just to be on the safe side. If you can afford them, since they cost twice as much.




  11. #10
    Senior Member PJungnitsch's Avatar
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    You might be ok with the 250. My temp gauge is hooked up at the top of the valve cover and it only goes over 212 sitting at idle (no airflow).

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