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  1. #1
    Senior Member chevyluver's Avatar
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    Ok so I bought a liter of fork oil from my local bike shop. My first question is: is $12.50 about right for the basic fork oil, or did they see me coming? Second question, the bolt that goes straight up into the fork I guess isn't a drain is it? I started unscrewing it and I could hear stuff turning all the way up the fork. If that bolt is an adjustment, how do I readjust it? The manual showes a drain bolt going sidways into the bottom of the fork, but mine doesn't have those, should I just take the fork off and turn it upside down to drain it? Thanks for the help.
    1999 TW200 Mods- Fishing rod holder, Tail bag, handlbar risers, and soon to be JimboSheild

  2. #2
    Senior Member bikerjosh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chevyluver View Post
    Ok so I bought a liter of fork oil from my local bike shop. My first question is: is $12.50 about right for the basic fork oil, or did they see me coming? Second question, the bolt that goes straight up into the fork I guess isn't a drain is it? I started unscrewing it and I could hear stuff turning all the way up the fork. If that bolt is an adjustment, how do I readjust it? The manual showes a drain bolt going sidways into the bottom of the fork, but mine doesn't have those, should I just take the fork off and turn it upside down to drain it? Thanks for the help.


    When I did mine, I pulled both fork tubes out of the crown, pulled off one cap at a time and tipped it upside down to drain. Careful to not let the spring come out. I emptied each side into a graduated pitcher so I could check the volume. While I had them apart I cut some spacers for the springs to increase preload and had the caps drilled/tapped for air valves.



    Good Luck-Josh
    Not all men are capable of greatness, but all possess toughness.
    2001 TW a mod or two maybeHidden Content

  3. #3
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chevyluver View Post
    Ok so I bought a liter of fork oil from my local bike shop. My first question is: is $12.50 about right for the basic fork oil, or did they see me coming? Second question, the bolt that goes straight up into the fork I guess isn't a drain is it? I started unscrewing it and I could hear stuff turning all the way up the fork. If that bolt is an adjustment, how do I readjust it? The manual showes a drain bolt going sidways into the bottom of the fork, but mine doesn't have those, should I just take the fork off and turn it upside down to drain it? Thanks for the help.


    If you loosened the allen head bolt in the end of the fork leg, were you able to retighten it, or does it just spin?



    It isn't an adjustment, it holds a tube that is part of your fork in place. If you were able to retighten it, good, you got lucky. If not you'll need to fashion a tool to reach the part that is inside the fork to tighten it.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  5. #4
    Senior Member PJungnitsch's Avatar
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    Yeah, these don't seem to have a drain bolt. I removed mine and drained it upside down. There's a measure for the fork oil height inside the tubes.



    As mentioned you may need to take it off, take out the spring and spacer, and lock the innards internally to tighten. On my old Yamaha XZ550 I needed a socket with a long extension and a double headed bolt to fit a large hex inside.

  6. #5
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJungnitsch View Post
    Yeah, these don't seem to have a drain bolt. I removed mine and drained it upside down. There's a measure for the fork oil height inside the tubes.



    As mentioned you may need to take it off, take out the spring and spacer, and lock the innards internally to tighten. On my old Yamaha XZ550 I needed a socket with a long extension and a double headed bolt to fit a large hex inside.


    On a TW, the tube requires a 19mm allen, or a 19mm bolt head. I make mine by finding a bolt with a 19mm hex head, then inserting the threaded part into the end of a piece of 1/2" water pipe thsat is a couple of feet long. I then drill through the pipe and the bolt and insert a cotter pin through both, or if you really want to get serious weld the bolt to the the pipe.



    Others probably have other variations of "the tool".



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  7. #6
    Senior Member Xracer's Avatar
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    I did pretty much the same as you guys but I also poured some mineral spirts into the tubes,pumped them a few times and drained out all the old gook and metal shavings.Also as long as you have the forks off it's a good time to R&R the stem bearings.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    Think you have a number of options, all should work fine. I am lucky and have one of those "Mighty Vac" tools. This little unit sucks air, and once the air is gone any liquid will follow. I use a 3' section of small i.d. straight metal brake line that can be purchased at most auto parts stores (inexpensive). On to this I push a section of tube and run it to a tightly sealed jar with an input for fluid and an output to pull a vacuum. The metal brake line with the tubing attached easily slips into the still mounted fork tube. I create a vacuum in the jar by pumping the "Mighty Vac" and all the fluid is drawn out.



    Yes, fork oil seems pretty expensive.



    In my opinion, those Mighty Vac type tools are pretty handy to have. I have used it alot in bleeding brakes and now, the forks. Gerry

    Take care my Friend.........

  9. #8
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Gerry,



    I don't have a Mighty Vac, but they are quite handy tools. I made my own version from scrap and left-overs from other projects. For a catch jar I used a peanut butter jar with a couple plastic vacuum connecters siliconed through holes in the lid. Aquarium air line has worked well for tubing. Over the years I've accumulated a number of adapters for various purposes--bleeding brakes and clutches, removing oil from marine inboards, removing oil from motorcycle forks, etc. For a vacuum source I stick the hose of a shop vac right to the top of the peanut butter jar lid. Works great.




  10. #9
    Senior Member chevyluver's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the help guys, I got the forks done today. They were starting to stick a little, but they feel great now. I ended up taking them off and turning them upside down to drain them.
    1999 TW200 Mods- Fishing rod holder, Tail bag, handlbar risers, and soon to be JimboSheild

  11. #10
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    Boy that's a neat idea using a vacuum (cleaner). Pull the air, and fluid will follow, very clever. I seem to be 'obsessed' about purchasing certain things, and Saskia just shakes her head. Over the last 15 years, seems I really like vacuums, bag phones, tire chains, small radios and purses (I call them tank bags).



    I will need to make a plug with a barb to fit into my vacuum hose. Got my 3/8" Snap-on impact driver in the mail yesterday and purchased some nice (much better than I had) Protaper tie-down straps today on my way home from work. All this based on good information from well established forum members. Thanks Qwerty.... Gerry
    Take care my Friend.........

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