valve adjusters: intake valve died, who fights next?
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  1. #1
    Senior Member jontow's Avatar
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    Well, I knew it was bound to happen: previous owner (and potentially a few owners before him) never adjusted the valves on my bike. I did it immediately when I got it, and noted that the adjusting screw and top of the valve was worn at an angle to complement each other. I adjusted as best I could to let it even out a bit, then did it again 500 miles later with much better results.



    The damage done by the previous owner was already set in stone, though: the adjusting screw mushroomed a bit, and today on my way back from work, it let loose and demolished everything up to the threads on the intake valve adjusting screw, also smashing the valve collets up a bit. I was hoping to get the rest of the season out of it, but no such luck!



    boats.net, here I come, order and express shipping in hand..



    Anyone have any suggestions on additional items I should get into while I'm doing this? I'm considering just doing a teardown tonight to see what else: cam chain/sprockets, cam chain guide, etc. The bike is a '97, is there anything I'm likely to break while doing this, so I can just go ahead and order it up front?



    I'm thinking I'll also look into a machinist to do a valve grind and let them do the disassembly/reassembly job on the valves, as well as seats/seals, etc.
    --

    1997 TW, well loved, a bit modified.

  2. #2
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    The early model engines are pretty tight. Fix what broke and ride it.




  3. #3
    Senior Member jontow's Avatar
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    I'll snap a picture or two this evening and throw 'em up. Kinda ugly



    So you'd forego the valve grind and all that, just find a valve spring compressor that fits and order a new valve, collets, and adjuster screw and go for it?

    (certainly a lot cheaper that way)
    --

    1997 TW, well loved, a bit modified.

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  5. #4
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    If you do a new valve, you'll probably bing the guide and seal getting the old one out. A new valve will need to be ground, anyway. Odds are the exhaust is close to biffed, too. Do a valve job as that's what needs to be done. The early TW engines have pretty much been dependable as rocks. If nothing else is broken, there's nothing that needs fixing. If there is not a significant ring groove in the cylinder and the bore looks good with the piston at BDC, I wouldn't even take it off. While you have the side cover off, fish around with a magnet for any pieces that might have fallen down into the case. Not that I think a bit of metal would be a problem, the screen would catch that.




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