Tdub up on the lift for chain and sprockets.
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  1. #1
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, the seal on the bearing in the case side cover was leaking and I don't have one. I took pictures to show how to figure out which seal is leaking.



    Cover came off without breaking the gasket. Again. This is the third chain and sprocket replacement without breaking the gasket so it's going back on with the old gasket. Good thing. I bought a gasket for the first change and never used it. Now I can't find it.



    I chose to unplug the wires rather than to unbolt the electrical parts in the side cover. Just seemed like an easier and less damage-prone way to get the cover flat on the hoist to deal with the messed up outboard countershaft bearing seal retainer plate screws. Also don't have to break the gasket.



    Screws holding the seal retainer on the side cover were worn by the worn chain so one succumbed to vicegrips, the other to chisel and hammer. They will be replaced. I took pictures and will post a how-to on stubborn screw removal.



    I took pictures to write up how to deal with the case cover bolts without stripping the heads or threads. Two methods, one using a hand impact and one using an extension. All done with 1/4-inch drive sockets to illustrate how little force is actually needed when one exercises a little patience. Even loosened the gearshift bolt and countershaft sprocket bolts with 1/4-inch drive. Now I can't find the cable to download the pictures from the camera.



    Oh, well.



    EDIT: YIPPEEEEE! I was out scrounging through some 550 parts and found the seal for the outboard countershaft bearing. Tdub will be going back together tomorrow.




  2. #2
    Member thal13's Avatar
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    Thanks qwerty - this post is very timely and I'll be following it. I threw my chain a couple nights ago and it took me about an hour to pull the rear wheel, untangle and re-assemble. At 11pm by flashlight in 90 degree, 90% humidity...



    Manual says to adjust chain for only 1/2 inch deflection, which seems very tight - I can hear a new noise when coasting that sounds like it's coming from the front spocket, sort of a stretchy creaky noise that oscillates according to speed. Don't know if the chain is twisted from being sucked into the rear sprocket, or if it's just too tight. Adjustment cams are at approx. 7.2 by the stamped numbers.



    So, it's likely time for a new chain and sprockets. Thanks again for sharing.



    Mike

  3. #3
    Senior Member RodneyReed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thal13 View Post
    Thanks qwerty - this post is very timely and I'll be following it. I threw my chain a couple nights ago and it took me about an hour to pull the rear wheel, untangle and re-assemble. At 11pm by flashlight in 90 degree, 90% humidity...



    Manual says to adjust chain for only 1/2 inch deflection, which seems very tight - I can hear a new noise when coasting that sounds like it's coming from the front spocket, sort of a stretchy creaky noise that oscillates according to speed. Don't know if the chain is twisted from being sucked into the rear sprocket, or if it's just too tight. Adjustment cams are at approx. 7.2 by the stamped numbers.



    So, it's likely time for a new chain and sprockets. Thanks again for sharing.



    Mike


    If you're running the stock gearing and stock chain length, then your chain is COMPLETELY worn out. It most likely derailed because it was so worn. I would park the bike until you get a new chain/sprockets, as it could derail again and sometimes a derail will break your side cover (or worse).

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  5. #4
    Senior Member peter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
    If you're running the stock gearing and stock chain length, then your chain is COMPLETELY worn out. It most likely derailed because it was so worn. I would park the bike until you get a new chain/sprockets, as it could derail again and sometimes a derail will break your side cover (or worse).
    Quick question, what is the stock sprocket on a 2010? 15t or 14t?

  6. #5
    Senior Member RodneyReed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter View Post
    Quick question, what is the stock sprocket on a 2010? 15t or 14t?


    14t

  7. #6
    Member thal13's Avatar
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    Thanks Rodney- looking forward to qwerty's writeup so I can dive into the job with more confidence. For now I'm riding very conservatively. When the chain derailed it locked the rear at ~30 mph. I credit my mountain bike racing experience for the controlled slide to the side of the road. Now I'm on hyper alert and town commute only.

  8. #7
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    I found the camera cable this afternoon and it's charging.



    Stock sprockets are 14/50 in most of the world, 14/45 in Australia. 14/50 is a good all-around ratio. The bike will hardly ever over-rev in 5th and will pull hills well offroad in first. If you want to keep the stock ratio, the Yamaha sprockets are an excellent value--cheap as any fromonline sources and excellent quality. However, the stock chain is crap. Better to replace it with a better quality chain. I prefer o-ring chain for the easy maintenance. 25,000 miles on a chain and sprocket set aint't bad at all. I've never found a brand of o-ring 428 chain that wasn't good quality. Google 428 o-ring and pick a vendor and brand by price.



    the stock chain is 122 links long. Either order one custom cut or you'll need to cut it yourself--an easy chore with a dremel or chain breaker.




  9. #8
    Senior Member sorethumb's Avatar
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    I have picked up a couple DID 428V o-ring chains for my project with the 428 o-ring rivet link masters. Thal, you might consider "upgrading" to rivet links instead of the clip style master when you re-chain.



    I need to make a 150 link chain to fit my extended swingarm, so I found two 90 link chains on clearance and am going to build my 150 link from them with the rivet link masters. I am planning on evenly spacing the rivet links within the chain. From my research a properly riveted master *should* be just as strong as the other links in the chain. Plus, since my bike will be street only, the chain should not be subject to the stress induced by off road riding.



    A few questions for you more experienced guys:

    1. Is my method and rationale above correct?

    2. Can you recommend a chain rivet tool that won't break my bank account?



    Edit: I have also picked up new JT sprockets in 14/47.
    Custom 1998 TW200 Build Thread Hidden Content | 2003 TW200 | 2009 KLX351

  10. #9
    Member thal13's Avatar
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    Ok, I've ordered stock ratio sprockets and an o-ring chain from my local shop (I like keeping him in business as he's the only bike shop in my town). What other incidentals are needed? I'll likely go online for whatever else is needed, such as gaskets or new bolts etc...

  11. #10
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sorethumb View Post
    I have picked up a couple DID 428V o-ring chains for my project with the 428 o-ring rivet link masters. Thal, you might consider "upgrading" to rivet links instead of the clip style master when you re-chain.



    I need to make a 150 link chain to fit my extended swingarm, so I found two 90 link chains on clearance and am going to build my 150 link from them with the rivet link masters. I am planning on evenly spacing the rivet links within the chain. From my research a properly riveted master *should* be just as strong as the other links in the chain. Plus, since my bike will be street only, the chain should not be subject to the stress induced by off road riding.



    A few questions for you more experienced guys:

    1. Is my method and rationale above correct?

    2. Can you recommend a chain rivet tool that won't break my bank account?



    Edit: I have also picked up new JT sprockets in 14/47.
    TWs don't make enough power to worry about what kind of master link is used. I've never had any but the clip type and never had a failure. The only people I've known to have master links fail have personality types prone to "failures". In fact, they have lots of "failures", especially on parts they recently worked on. They also have lots of "accidents". Never their fault, though.



    You should never, ever use two master links? Why? I don't know. I've never had a master link fail. I guess having 2 master links doubles your chances of a master link failure. 2 x 0 = 0



    Quote Originally Posted by thal13 View Post
    Ok, I've ordered stock ratio sprockets and an o-ring chain from my local shop (I like keeping him in business as he's the only bike shop in my town). What other incidentals are needed? I'll likely go online for whatever else is needed, such as gaskets or new bolts etc...
    3AW-15451-03-00 GASKET, CRANKCASE COVER, 1 needed

    90215-08160-00 WASHER, LOCK, 3 needed



    You may or may not need any of these parts. If you don't need them, you probably will next time. If you do need them and don't have them, you don't ride.




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