2005 carb issues, slow to idle down
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Thread: 2005 carb issues, slow to idle down

  1. #1
    Senior Member MrDNA's Avatar
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    I had to pull apart the carb on this bike a couple of months ago because it sat too long and the foat valve wasn't seating, and the bike was sending fuel down the overflow if I didn't shut the petcock off, plus it was running rich. Did the quick clean outlined here in the forum, replaced the float valve assembly and bowl seal and problem solved.



    Now I'm encountering a new carburetor issue. The bike is starting fine and feels pretty good through the low, mid and high circuits, but it is taking too long for the bike to come back down to idle after I come to a stop, and I can feel it still rev'ing high between shift points when I drop the throttle. The other symptom I'm encountering is when I restart the bike after being stopped for a while (it starts fine), it is rev'ing high again, and takes 15 seconds or so to get to normal idle.



    In my mind, it seems like the slide must be hanging up.



    While I was in the carb the first time, I noticed that the main jet was stamped 126, which I don't think is standard for a 2005 in CA, so I'm guessing the previous owner may have been playing with the carb in general, right?



    In the quick clean i did awhile back, I didn't go into the vacuum chamber at all, so now I'm thinking I have to take a look at that end. I'll be careful of any extra washer on top of the needle just in case, and I'll also check the alignment of the main nozzle piece in case it's installed incorrectly. That and making sure the parts are all clean and everything is moving smoothly is all I can think of doing.



    Before I get to the tools, thought I'd see is someone has been here or can point me to the right place in the forums. I have looked around a bunch, but to no avail. Any insight is appreciated. Thanks!
    Something witty...



    2005 & 2010 TW200

  2. #2
    Senior Member MrDNA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrDNA View Post
    I had to pull apart the carb on this bike a couple of months ago because it sat too long and the foat valve wasn't seating, and the bike was sending fuel down the overflow if I didn't shut the petcock off, plus it was running rich. Did the quick clean outlined here in the forum, replaced the float valve assembly and bowl seal and problem solved.



    Now I'm encountering a new carburetor issue. The bike is starting fine and feels pretty good through the low, mid and high circuits, but it is taking too long for the bike to come back down to idle after I come to a stop, and I can feel it still rev'ing high between shift points when I drop the throttle. The other symptom I'm encountering is when I restart the bike after being stopped for a while (it starts fine), it is rev'ing high again, and takes 15 seconds or so to get to normal idle.



    In my mind, it seems like the slide must be hanging up.



    While I was in the carb the first time, I noticed that the main jet was stamped 126, which I don't think is standard for a 2005 in CA, so I'm guessing the previous owner may have been playing with the carb in general, right?



    In the quick clean i did awhile back, I didn't go into the vacuum chamber at all, so now I'm thinking I have to take a look at that end. I'll be careful of any extra washer on top of the needle just in case, and I'll also check the alignment of the main nozzle piece in case it's installed incorrectly. That and making sure the parts are all clean and everything is moving smoothly is all I can think of doing.



    Before I get to the tools, thought I'd see is someone has been here or can point me to the right place in the forums. I have looked around a bunch, but to no avail. Any insight is appreciated. Thanks!


    Just an update to close out my observations for future reference:



    I did find one reference to the throttle cable adjustment that I thought I would verify before I pulled the carb again. That was all good as well, a little loose on the go juice, and a little tight on the return cable..



    Out of ideas, I took the carb completely out again and this time went after the vacuum chamber. Nothing visually wrong up top, so I just washed the slide and diaphragm with soap and water and wiped out the chamber and tube with a carb cleaner soaked rag.



    Since I didn't see anything wrong up top, I pulled the bowl again and pulled the main jet, tube, and the little piece that sits on top of the tube and goes into the hole to the throat. There are plenty of warning out here to make sure that piece is running in the correct direction, so I just wanted to make sure. Of course, the second I popped it out, I lost track of it's orientation. I cleaned up some varnish off that small part and the needle. I also took the time to check the float level this time - it was out, and then I patiently reassembled everything back together.



    With everything back in place, she started up on the first attempt, and even idled reasonable well out of the box. Off for a test drive. The slow return to idle was gone, so problem resolved. After letting the bike warm up, we hit some larger roads that let me check the mid and top end circuits and all seems well with those areas. Plenty of acceleration through the mid and high ends, and easily went to 60mph as it always has. No popping when downshifting or going down a hill in gear.



    So, another happy ending! Thanks to anyone and everyone for posting all the fantastic technical advice, opinion, photos and folklore that help make this one of the most useful site on the internet - for TW owners anyway. Peace!
    Something witty...



    2005 & 2010 TW200

  3. #3
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    Well, i totally missed this thread. Your experience is exactly why I caution against half-assed mechanical work on anything. Better to always do a complete job of something, because as soon as you don't, as often as not you'll be doing the whole thing again. I don't know why, that's just the way it is.




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  5. #4
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    Glad it worked out for you. I am notorious at having a problem, pulling it apart, not finding anthing wrong, put it back together and it's good to go, not ever knowing what the heck I did to get it right!



    On the other hand. . .Reverse of what I said previous. I've learned not to take something apart that ain't broke or it will be when I get done with it, not ever knowing what the heck I did to break it!



    I'm so glad my carb's been working fine since day 1.
    Hidden Content A ride in the woods helps me relax and release tension. The fact I'm dragging a body should be entirely irrelevant?

  6. #5
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Publishing our screwups has more value than publishing our successes.



    Good on ya.



    r80rt likes this.
    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  7. #6
    Senior Member uktw125's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizrdbrth View Post
    Publishing our screwups has more value than publishing our successes.



    Good on ya.


    I totally agree.



    A phrase from a very wise old friend told me, "any man who never made a mistake never made anything".



    You can't argue with that and I've certainly made a few.

  8. #7
    Senior Member MrDNA's Avatar
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    Qwerty, you are absolutely right. I'm kicking myself for not breaking down the whole thing the first time. They don't call it half-ass for nothin' , so I wasn't surprised by the result and accepted that I had to go back in. Why do we always think we can cheat time, right? It rarely works out.



    So yes, lesson learned, and of course my big mouth wants to expound on that for the benefit of others. First, I'm sorry I ever followed the TK quick clean procedures. It only takes another couple of minutes to pull the carb completely out as opposed to leaving it in, so why not take it all the way out of the bike and get a good look at the entire thing. It's easier to work on, easier to identify everything, and physically more comfortable to be sitting instead of bent over on one knee. Good light and a good magnifier will help a lot to verify your work and the condition of the parts.



    My situation, where a carb is messed up from years of bad storage, you really need to remove the carb and take the whole thing apart - ONE time! Clean it as outlined in the forum, replace any suspect orings,and float seal, Write down all your jet information while you have it available, check your float level then take your time putting it back together.



    This is only the 3rd time I've ever had to play with tearing down a carb, and it was by far the easiest thanks to the information and pictures on this forum. There was not a single thing in this carb that was not pictured perfectly in the photos on this site. It is exactly what is there, so I would tell anyone who can twist a screwdriver with any skill that this is a fairly straight forward job to perform - IF you have to. I probably would never have opened the float bowl if the bike wasn't leaking fuel.



    My float drain screw was already stripped out by the PO, so the only real danger in the entire operation after that is in removing the float bowl pin, which is the only way you are going to get at the float valve. There is a good post on taking it out too! Personally, I think you have to check the float valve assembly if you are having flow problems. There are two rubber parts here: an Oring and the the tip of the needle, so if carb cleaner or old fuel has been attacking them... you have to check them.



    You can buy a pack of guitar strings for a couple bucks, and it will give you a lot of peace of mind in working with your jets. The only other thing you need to do is replace the 4 screws that secure the float bowl with allen's. When you are done, if you ever have to mess with your carburetor again, you will know it after going through this process.



    We do have two TW's, so even though I had to learn this the hard way, I ain't afraid of no stinking TW carburetor any more.



    One last thing for Lizrdbrth: I saw your post on checking the fuel level using the clear tube as they show in the manual. You got a quick cheat on making that special tool? It's just gravity, right, so a glass tube that you can measure off of and some tubing?
    Something witty...



    2005 & 2010 TW200

  9. #8
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    It's not really a shortcut. More a means to make sure that float level is out of whack before you tear the carb off, a way to make a quick periodic check during maintenence, or to verify the level after an adjustment.



    I'd pass on the manual's measurement. Set the float level to a gnat's whisker with a ruler. Put everything back together. Take the bike for a ride and wring it's neck to make sure everything is right.



    Then, using a piece of clear vinyl tubing attached to the opened float bowl drain, measure the level and make a permanent reference mark on the float bowl (old style carb) or carb body (new style carb) using a scribe or electric pencil. The new carb is easy. The manual gives you the spec, so just pull the bowl and put the mark on the carb body by measuring up from the mating surface.



    No extra measuring hardware that way, and a consistent point of measurement. All you'd need to CHECK it from that day forward would be the tubing. You'd still need to get inside to SET it.



    Nothing real groundbreaking. The factory "tool" is primarily for people who work on a lot of different bikes. Totally unnecessary once you mark your carb.



    r80rt likes this.
    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  10. #9
    Member birdmove's Avatar
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    I had the same problemn with a new 2007 Royal Enfield 500 Bullet. The throttle was very slow to return to idle. It the case of that bike it turned out to be a setup problem the dealer should have caufgt. The idle air screw was turned all the way in. Brougfht it out a few turns and the engine would return to idle rpms normally.



    jon
    Jon

    Keaau, Hawaii

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