New O-Ring Chain: Q's
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  1. #1
    Member bend42's Avatar
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    Next summer I plan to spend 4 months in the Yukon and Alaska; my TW rides on the back of our expedition vehicle as its ‘recon’ vehicle and escape pod. We will be pushing into the remotest places we can find [definitely way off pavement], so the TW will have to plow thru more mud than I think I ever wanted to know even exists.



    I decided to replace the stock chain with an o-ring DID 428Vx122 in hopes that both cleaning and overall maintenance in a sloppy environment will be simpler and less frequent.



    Everything’s strung and connected, and I am at the point of adjusting chain slack; I have a few questions:



    1. Should I expect ‘some’ stretching of this brand new chain? How many miles before this is likely to stabilize?



    2. Does anyone have authoritative information on the correct slack range for a 2010 TW? Is it ‘better’ to err toward a more or less slack chain if one cannot hit the range just right?

    As has been noted here previously, Yamaha has published conflicting numbers for desired slack adjustment. My 2010 Owners Manual gives a range of 1.38”—2.36”; the main/1987 Service Manual gives 1.2”—1.6”. [The 2001 supplement is silent on this matter.] I am inclined to go with the 1.38”—2.36” range, both because it is a newer number and because I have the impression that it is better to err toward a looser than a tighter chain. I have found that the eccentric ['snail'] cam on my rear axel forces me into a jump from 1.625” to 2.125” in one click.



    3. I am mounting the new chain with 1300 miles on the bike. After cleaning the sprockets my visual inspection revealed only a minimal polish mark [slightly smooth appearance] on the teeth of the sprockets; certainly no deformation, elongation or sign of significant wear. Any reason to question not replacing the sprockets [just asking as I have seen posts here about this]?



    [P.S. I have done a comprehensive search of the Forum on "chain slack measurement", so please don't suggest that I do this as a reply!]

  2. #2
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    If you want "perfect" chain adjustment on a TW (or any other bike) ignore the service manual and get the real deal. Here's how to get it:



    Jack the bike up on a stand. Preferably a bike lift.



    Remove the shock.



    Swing the swingarm through its arc by lifting the wheel until you find the spot where the chain is at its tightest. Adjust the chain to be just slack enough that the swingarm will move freely past this point.



    Re-install the shock and take the bike off the lift.



    Bounce the suspension a few times, then take a slack measurement with the bike on the ground from a point of reference that you can access easily. Doesn't matter where it is along the swingarm as long as you use the same spot every time.



    Find your spot, write down the measurements and it will be your ideal minimum slack for the life of the bike.



    To get the "ouside" measurement (maximum allowable slack before adjustment) back the snail adjusters off by one click. Take another measurement at your "spot", then never allow the slack to exceed that number.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  3. #3
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    1. Get a fat chick to straddle the bike and hold it vertical.

    2. Block both sides of the swingarm so the back tire is off the ground.

    3. Get the fat chick to sit on the bike slowly, so the suspension compresses to the point the chain is as tight as it will get. Do not let the fat chick sit to heavily on the bike because the chain will loosen up at the limits of suspension compression.

    4. Spin the tire slowly and see if the chain slightly tightens and loosens as the sprocket turns (most sprockets are slightly out of round to prevent harmonics.)

    5. Position the wheel so the chain is tightest, pull the wheel all the way back, then ease of one notch on the adjuster.

    6. Rotate the tire until the chain is as loose as it gets, knock the fat chick off the bike, remove the blocks, place the bike on the side stand, and raise the back wheel off the ground by lifting and supporting the frame, not the swingarm.

    7. Measure the slack in the chain.



    If you measure the salck in the chain with the bike on the side stand different loads on the bike will affect the measurement. A consistent and repeatable measurement requires unloading the rear suspension.



    If you don't have a fat chick, two skinny chicks will do, or a fat guy, or loading the bike on a trailer backwards and using tiedowns to load the suspension, or a bear sitting on the seat, or lead in the top box, or ... .



    the chain is tightest when the countershaft, swing arm pivot bolt, and axle are in a straight line.




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  5. #4
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Do the work. Pull the shock.



    That is all.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  6. #5
    Senior Member Rhodetrip's Avatar
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    OK, tell us about your expedition vehicle.

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  7. #6
    Senior Member Malkop's Avatar
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    Am going to try the fat chick and pulling the shock methods and report back which is the most hazardous to the health.

  8. #7
    Senior Member evan's Avatar
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    LOL, thanks for the laugh about the fat chick....I've always just sat on seat with as much weight as possible, have bike vertical and check for slight chain slack. Done this for years, never had any chain problems....
    Mike Carter. Woodland, California (NorCal). '89 Tw200 (Black Widow Edition). Blood red Jimbo shield, Cycleracks, Nuvi 500 GPS, Kolpin fuel pack jr., D shield bark busters, 55t rear sprocket, Golden boy front tire, Ricochet shield.

  9. #8
    Banned qwerty's Avatar
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    What it all boils down to is countershaft, swing arm pivot, and axle is a straight line and the chain not too tight. Doesn't matter how you get them lined up, just so they are. I always use a few bars of gold bullion on the rack. Works great.




  10. #9
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    My way is cheaper to feed......



    Apparently my method is too technical for some. For the rest of you, running the swingarm through its arc and knowing at what point of adjustment you'll rip out your output shaft on a bump might be helpful info. Takes about 15 minutes including pulling the shock.



    The problem with our snail adjusters is that they force you to run excess slack before you can adjust again without ripping out your output shaft on a bump. Not a real ideal system for best chain and sprocket life, but cheap to manufacture and close enough for government work.



    Qwerty, virtually ZERO sprocket manufacturers deliberately produce out-of-round sprockets for harmonics or for any other reason. Perfect concentricity is the goal of the industry and anything less is the mark of a cheap product and poor quality control. I've heard you present this notion as fact in the past and if you can substantiate otherwise I'd be very interested in hearing it. The potential for obtaining a crappy, out-of-round sprocket only makes the case for knowing the proper settings unless you just want to always err on the loose side, which is good enough for government work as well. Just not real kind to sprockets.



    I'm gunna go quiet on the subject with a trick question:



    Where's the middle of your chain?



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  11. #10
    Member bend42's Avatar
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    lizrdbrth and qwerty



    thanks for the replies, and qwerty's last post explains why the seemingly Rube Goldberg process.



    What slack range do you end up with when you trim it out your respective ways?



    I'd like to know how close it comes to the factory recommendations!



    Also, what about the new chain stretching over the first miles? much?



    thanks, John

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