best performance upgrade bang for buck
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  1. #1
    Junior Member sdim66's Avatar
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    What I'm looking for is a little advice on performance improvements, but I'm not interested in having to tweak every change of season. My 2009 TW resides at about 2500 - 4000 ft altitude... in the Appalachian mountains. Purchased in South Carolina. I have the stock jetting, which I think is #125... is this correct #? What I find is that the bike takes long to warm up, maybe indicating lean mixture. I've read about the "popping" during decel indicating a lean mixture, but higher altitude provides richer mixture. I'm just a little confused. Anyone have any advice based on my altitude? Should I try going richer with #128? Is an exhaust change worth doing? I've read qwerty's post on carb tuning, just needing some clarification and personal guidance if anyone has two cents to offer. I'm not looking to make the bike into something beyond its intended purposes, just get the most out of the 196cc, but also don't want to compromise fuel economy.

  2. #2
    Senior Member jbfla's Avatar
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    2 cents worth...



    Go with a 128 or 130 main jet and 3 to 5 .01" shims under the main needle. Best bang for the buck.



    I ride in western NC from 1,500 to 5,000 feet altitude. [s]I have tried both the 128 and the 130 and cannot notice any measurable difference. (using a 128 currently).[/s]



    Be sure to open the slow speed pilot jet screw 2.5 turns, then tune from there.



    jb



    EDIT: I changed back to a 130 main jet... yes, I can tell the difference.
    2018 Triumph Street Twin..............2016 CB500F
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  3. #3
    Senior Member small's's Avatar
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    A WR250 would be the best performance upgrade. I think most stock bikes come with a 128 main. Shim the needle and try a 130. My

    Lean surge went away and it doesnt take forever to warm up.

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    I know this may not seem like "performance" but you will be a lot more impressed with the bike if the rubber remains in contact with the dirt. If you ride off pavement a fair amount, ditch the stock front tire as it has a hard time committing to keeping you upright. Take care. Gerry



    https://tw200forum.com/index.php?/top...__1#entry35713
    Take care my Friend.........

  6. #5
    Junior Member sdim66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Small's View Post
    A WR250 would be the best performance upgrade. I think most stock bikes come with a 128 main. Shim the needle and try a 130. My

    Lean surge went away and it doesnt take forever to warm up.


    On qwerty's post he states late model 49 states and canada have #125. That's where I got that from. I was hoping someone would verify.

  7. #6
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    Sean, the information posted here is a pretty good general guideline, but you're going to have to do the work and physically put eyeballs on your jets.



    I've seen numerous Cali bikes with the 49-state jetting and vice-versa, for example. No point ordering a 128 if you already have one, or jumping from a 125 to a 130 if you don't. Assume nuttin'.



    So few TW's actually run as they should when stock, then their owners further magnify the problem by piling on "upgrades". My .02 is to get yours dialed in 100% stock so you'll have a basis by which to judge future changes.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

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  8. #7
    Senior Member small's's Avatar
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    I have thought about swapping carbs on my bike. I have a 98 and an 07. The older carb on the 98 has alot more low end power or "throttle response" the power is still there on the newer carbed bike but it doesnt come on till higher in the rpm range. I can tell a big difference in gravel or while climbing a hill at low rpm then getting on the throttle. In gravel if i nail the throttle in first or second the older bike will actually spin the tire a bit or even get the rear out a little but the other doesnt. I dont know if others have noticed this or just me but it might be hard to tell unless you ride them back to back.

  9. #8
    Senior Member tw200sgp's Avatar
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    I found an iridium plug (about US$15) to be a surprisingly positive investment. I knew they were the ducks nuts for 2 strokes (less fouling) but I didn't realize how much they can help a four stroke become more stable, slightly more responsive and less prone to cut outs in traffic.

  10. #9
    Senior Member twjay's Avatar
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    Jetting, as stated above, was the best bang for the buck mod I've done.



    Exhaust and K&N filter did very little..they were cosmetic and an "easier maintenance/repairs" upgrade for me.

  11. #10
    Senior Member MrDNA's Avatar
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    I vote for jetting and carb adjustments. Once I got the bikes re jetted and tuned right, I didn't feel like I needed to do much else. It changed the way they ride on the road by a large measure. Huge really; tamed and cooled down the 'wild beast'. Since then, keeping everything running nice and smooth has been cheap and easy - Staying on top of the maintenance, basic adjustments, especially the chain adjustment, since I'm still running my stock chain. I'm down near sea level, but I like to go up hills, so I've played with the stock #126, a 128 & a130... #130 works best all around for me. I was up round 8000' last summer and probably would have done better with a lower number, but I stayed with the 130 and was fine. General assessment: Lean is not good on these bikes.
    Something witty...



    2005 & 2010 TW200

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