Air valve on top of forks
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  1. #1
    Member Drifter's Avatar
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    I purchased a 94 model two weeks ago with only 3,500 miles on it for 1,000 bucks. It was in fantasic shape.I immediately changed the oil,new filter,adjusted the valves,had a surge in mid range,so I had the carb cleaned and rebuilt for $25.00.I thought it was a cheap investment.Runs fantastic now,no hiccups.New parts on the way are seals and gaskets for a sprocket change,and a new O-chain.The only thing left is new tires,and then its off for some serious riding.Anyway to make a short story long,"sorry I got off track." There are air valves on each of my forks.Are they good or bad? Leave them in or take them out? What air pessure to run?I don't plan on putting a front rack on,so really what would be the advantage?
    1994 TW

    Had but regrettably sold a 1982 KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica

  2. #2
    Senior Member atleastbehandy's Avatar
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    The previous owner has done a DIY air-shock. You can increase the stiffness of the shocks by increasing the air pressure.



    Be careful though... too much pressure will destroy your fork seals!



    I think 5psi is a typical starting point.
    2005 TW200, 2" PowerMadd bar riser, Tusk D-Flex Hand Guards, PowerMadd Hand Muffs, Kick-Start, Valco Cup Holder, Givi E45N Top Case, Inline fuel filter, Storage Tube with MSR bottle, 45 Tooth sprocket, Stebel Low Tone horn, #130 Main Jet / no needle shims / 1.5 turns out on idle, Jimbo Shield, DID O-Ring chain, Clarke XT250 4.1 Gal tank, Custom Cycleracks

  3. #3
    Senior Member assquatch20's Avatar
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    Yeah air shocks isn't a stock thing, so just get a general idea of what works. Not sure of the TW's fork specs, but if you can compare those to air rigs on popular bikes with similar length and diameter forks, that can give you an idea to dial it in.



    I will say, before you get serious on the trail, upgrade the skidplate.

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  5. #4
    Member Drifter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by assquatch20 View Post
    Yeah air shocks isn't a stock thing, so just get a general idea of what works. Not sure of the TW's fork specs, but if you can compare those to air rigs on popular bikes with similar length and diameter forks, that can give you an idea to dial it in.



    I will say, before you get serious on the trail, upgrade the skidplate.
    I hear you on the skid plate,it's pretty sad.
    1994 TW

    Had but regrettably sold a 1982 KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica

  6. #5
    Member Drifter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atleastbehandy View Post
    The previous owner has done a DIY air-shock. You can increase the stiffness of the shocks by increasing the air pressure.



    Be careful though... too much pressure will destroy your fork seals!



    I think 5psi is a typical starting point.
    THANKS
    1994 TW

    Had but regrettably sold a 1982 KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica

  7. #6
    Senior Member Retrofit's Avatar
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    Tried to pick up a tci plate yesterday at their office. Out of stock for 6 weeks... Grrrrr

  8. #7
    Senior Member dganey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drifter View Post
    I purchased a 94 model two weeks ago with only 3,500 miles on it for 1,000 bucks. It was in fantasic shape.I immediately changed the oil,new filter,adjusted the valves,had a surge in mid range,so I had the carb cleaned and rebuilt for $25.00.I thought it was a cheap investment.Runs fantastic now,no hiccups.New parts on the way are seals and gaskets for a sprocket change,and a new O-chain.The only thing left is new tires,and then its off for some serious riding.Anyway to make a short story long,"sorry I got off track." There are air valves on each of my forks.Are they good or bad? Leave them in or take them out? What air pessure to run?I don't plan on putting a front rack on,so really what would be the advantage?


    Leave them on you might need/want them. First let all of the air out and try the bike. Check for front end dive while braking/riding. Then add one or two PSI---the air pressure will increase as the air in the forks heat up with use. Be careful if much more than five or so PSI. The fork seals will not handle it. I use two psi with my hyperpro progressive rate spings.



    Dusty

  9. #8
    Senior Member rm_hm's Avatar
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    I've been thinking about creating a vacuum in the shock and then putting some nitrogen in with my valves. I've been running 5psi for the last 1k miles and seem to bottom out less.


  10. #9
    Senior Member TW-Brian's Avatar
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    I always thought that the purpose of the air valves on forks was to release the air pressure that normally builds up within the fork tubes, not for adding air/gas to the forks.

  11. #10
    Senior Member rm_hm's Avatar
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    New bikes like ktm's have bleeder valves on the forks. Some Kawasaki's need air added to the forks Others ( * there are at least 4 threads in here on how and why and lots of pictures*) will add from 5 to as much as 10lbs of air to each fork to stiffen things up. This can hasten seal failure if you like to ride agressive or have a older bike. So do at your own risk and use a good gauge. it takes just a tiny bit of air to hit 5psi















    From Chuck4788 over at thumpertalk

    "The advantage of air pressure is you can fine tune fork preload (or sag) and increase the spring rate. The downside is the pressure is difficult to monitor and maintain. In the late seventies I ran no springs in two of my MX bikes, relying on only air pressure for the spring. This provided a very progessive spring rate. Actually too progessive, so I reduced the oil level as far as I could. Also the system is too sensitive to small changes in pressure. My solution was to run a hose from the top of each leg to interconnect both fork legs to a single schrader valve mounted on the upper triple. Next I installed weak springs and reduced the air pressure, very much like the Honda recommendation. "


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